Vegetable broth vs. vegetable broth.

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Andy, Feb 20, 2006.

  1. Andy

    Andy Guest

    At Trader Joe's today.

    Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.

    Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99

    All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.

    I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.

    Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."

    Andy
     
    Tags:


  2. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    > At Trader Joe's today.
    >
    > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    >
    > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    >
    > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    >
    > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    >
    > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."


    But which one tastes better?

    The SF Chron thinks that KB does, although they rated another brand from
    TJ's even higher:

    http://sfgate.com/cgi-bin/article.cgi?file=/chronicle/archive/2005/01/19/
    FDG7VARD7H1.DTL

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  3. aem

    aem Guest

    Dan Abel wrote:
    > In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    > > At Trader Joe's today.
    > >
    > > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    > >
    > > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    > >
    > > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    > >
    > > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    > >
    > > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."

    >
    > But which one tastes better?
    >

    Exactly. It's not a numbers game. What matters is _which_ veggies and
    how do their flavors marry. (I have no opinion on veggie stocks
    because I use chicken stock for most things. The TJ organic chicken
    stock is quite good, though not as good as mine, naturally). -aem
     
  4. Andy

    Andy Guest

    "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1140465743.275434.128890
    @g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:

    >> But which one tastes better?
    >>

    > Exactly. It's not a numbers game. What matters is _which_ veggies and
    > how do their flavors marry. (I have no opinion on veggie stocks
    > because I use chicken stock for most things. The TJ organic chicken
    > stock is quite good, though not as good as mine, naturally). -aem
    >


    Agreed but the Trader Joe's chicken stock has 600+ g sodium. For my blood
    pressure that's just too much in one cup of stock.

    I just joined in on alt.support.diet and I'm almost drowning in nutrients
    and numbers.

    Andy
     
  5. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote in news:[email protected]
    virt.nntp.sonic.net:

    > But which one tastes better?
    >


    You have a point there, but your hair conceals it. <VBG>

    Andy
     
  6. Dan Abel

    Dan Abel Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1140465743.275434.128890
    > @g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    >
    > >> But which one tastes better?
    > >>

    > > Exactly. It's not a numbers game. What matters is _which_ veggies and
    > > how do their flavors marry. (I have no opinion on veggie stocks
    > > because I use chicken stock for most things. The TJ organic chicken
    > > stock is quite good, though not as good as mine, naturally). -aem
    > >

    >
    > Agreed but the Trader Joe's chicken stock has 600+ g sodium. For my blood
    > pressure that's just too much in one cup of stock.
    >
    > I just joined in on alt.support.diet and I'm almost drowning in nutrients
    > and numbers.



    Just cut it 50% with water. That'll cut that number in half!

    :)

    --
    Dan Abel
    [email protected]
    Petaluma, California, USA
     
  7. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Dan Abel <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:
    >
    >> "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1140465743.275434.128890
    >> @g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    >>
    >> >> But which one tastes better?
    >> >>
    >> > Exactly. It's not a numbers game. What matters is _which_ veggies
    >> > and how do their flavors marry. (I have no opinion on veggie
    >> > stocks because I use chicken stock for most things. The TJ organic
    >> > chicken stock is quite good, though not as good as mine,
    >> > naturally). -aem
    >> >

    >>
    >> Agreed but the Trader Joe's chicken stock has 600+ g sodium. For my
    >> blood pressure that's just too much in one cup of stock.
    >>
    >> I just joined in on alt.support.diet and I'm almost drowning in
    >> nutrients and numbers.

    >
    >
    > Just cut it 50% with water. That'll cut that number in half!
    >
    >:)



    Stop making sense!???

    Andy
     
  8. In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    > At Trader Joe's today.
    >
    > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    >
    > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    >
    > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    >
    > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    >
    > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."
    >
    > Andy


    Low sodium V-8 juice.......
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    > "aem" <[email protected]> wrote in news:1140465743.275434.128890
    > @g43g2000cwa.googlegroups.com:
    >
    > >> But which one tastes better?
    > >>

    > > Exactly. It's not a numbers game. What matters is _which_ veggies and
    > > how do their flavors marry. (I have no opinion on veggie stocks
    > > because I use chicken stock for most things. The TJ organic chicken
    > > stock is quite good, though not as good as mine, naturally). -aem
    > >

    >
    > Agreed but the Trader Joe's chicken stock has 600+ g sodium. For my blood
    > pressure that's just too much in one cup of stock.
    >
    > I just joined in on alt.support.diet and I'm almost drowning in nutrients
    > and numbers.
    >
    > Andy


    It's next to impossible imho to find any canned stock/broths that are
    low in sodium and not rediculously high in price.

    I either make my own, or use V-8 juice.
    V-8 makes a low sodium juice that really IS low sodium, and is an
    excellent soup base.

    In fact, it's quite tasty by itself, heated, and used as a soup.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  10. Andy

    Andy Guest

    OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote in news:Omelet-
    [email protected]:


    > It's next to impossible imho to find any canned stock/broths that are
    > low in sodium and not rediculously high in price.
    >
    > I either make my own, or use V-8 juice.
    > V-8 makes a low sodium juice that really IS low sodium, and is an
    > excellent soup base.
    >
    > In fact, it's quite tasty by itself, heated, and used as a soup.



    Om,

    Thanks again for sharing the magic!

    All the best,

    Andy
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, Andy <q> wrote:

    > OmManiPadmeOmelet <[email protected]> wrote in news:Omelet-
    > [email protected]:
    >
    >
    > > It's next to impossible imho to find any canned stock/broths that are
    > > low in sodium and not rediculously high in price.
    > >
    > > I either make my own, or use V-8 juice.
    > > V-8 makes a low sodium juice that really IS low sodium, and is an
    > > excellent soup base.
    > >
    > > In fact, it's quite tasty by itself, heated, and used as a soup.

    >
    >
    > Om,
    >
    > Thanks again for sharing the magic!
    >
    > All the best,
    >
    > Andy


    Hope it works for ya! :)
    Anytime I can save $$$, it's a good thing!
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  12. Andy wrote:

    > At Trader Joe's today.
    >
    > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    >
    > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    >
    > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    >
    > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    >
    > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."
    >
    > Andy


    IMO the fine meshed 'sieve' of the old kitchens is so seriously
    underrated as to be completely forgotten in these days of food
    processors and such.

    One way of getting a very fine veggie stock is to strain the stock
    through the sieve and press on the veggies so as to squeeze out as much
    moisture in the cooked veggies as possible.

    Some 'old school' recipes call for the 'sieving' of those veggies,
    rubbing them through the metal mesh of the sieve to turn them into a
    very fine puree that is added to the stock, i wont go this far,
    preferring to add fresh veggies to the stock and barely blanch them
    before serving.
    ---
    JL
     
  13. In article <[email protected]>,
    Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Andy wrote:
    >
    > > At Trader Joe's today.
    > >
    > > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    > >
    > > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    > >
    > > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    > >
    > > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    > >
    > > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."
    > >
    > > Andy

    >
    > IMO the fine meshed 'sieve' of the old kitchens is so seriously
    > underrated as to be completely forgotten in these days of food
    > processors and such.
    >
    > One way of getting a very fine veggie stock is to strain the stock
    > through the sieve and press on the veggies so as to squeeze out as much
    > moisture in the cooked veggies as possible.
    >
    > Some 'old school' recipes call for the 'sieving' of those veggies,
    > rubbing them through the metal mesh of the sieve to turn them into a
    > very fine puree that is added to the stock, i wont go this far,
    > preferring to add fresh veggies to the stock and barely blanch them
    > before serving.
    > ---
    > JL
    >
    >


    I'll pressure cook veggies after slicing them into medium slices, then
    just drop them into a screen strainer and mashthem down to get all the
    juice. I'll then discard those, and add fresh veggies to the stock, then
    cook them lightly.

    If I want to extract the "mush" for a creamy type soup, I use the
    Victorio strainer. :) Those that don't own one of those can use a China
    Cap.

    I freeze the tough stems that I break off of asparagus prior to cooking
    them. The frozen ones come out of the freezer nice and soft. I pressure
    cook those, then run them thru the victorio to get all that lovely
    asparagus mush to make a cream of asparagus soup.

    I add fresh chopped, tender asparagus to that for texture. ;-d

    It's a lot of work, I don't do it very often.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  14. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Andy wrote:
    > >
    > > > At Trader Joe's today.
    > > >
    > > > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    > > >
    > > > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    > > >
    > > > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    > > >
    > > > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.

    >
    > > >
    > > > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO

    > BRAINER."
    > > >
    > > > Andy

    > >
    > > IMO the fine meshed 'sieve' of the old kitchens is so seriously
    > > underrated as to be completely forgotten in these days of food
    > > processors and such.
    > >
    > > One way of getting a very fine veggie stock is to strain the stock
    > > through the sieve and press on the veggies so as to squeeze out as

    > much
    > > moisture in the cooked veggies as possible.
    > >
    > > Some 'old school' recipes call for the 'sieving' of those veggies,
    > > rubbing them through the metal mesh of the sieve to turn them into a

    >
    > > very fine puree that is added to the stock, i wont go this far,
    > > preferring to add fresh veggies to the stock and barely blanch them
    > > before serving.
    > > ---
    > > JL
    > >
    > >

    >
    > I'll pressure cook veggies after slicing them into medium slices, then
    >
    > just drop them into a screen strainer and mashthem down to get all the
    >
    > juice. I'll then discard those, and add fresh veggies to the stock,
    > then
    > cook them lightly.
    >
    > If I want to extract the "mush" for a creamy type soup, I use the
    > Victorio strainer. :) Those that don't own one of those can use a
    > China
    > Cap.


    I wonder if that would be the same thing as what i call a 'food mill' a
    sauce pan like thing with a conical strainer in the bottom and a blade
    that is turned in the pan, cranked by hand to mash veggies and extract
    juices. I used to use this on blanched veggies for various creme soups
    and sauces but now a days use my mini prep food processor.

    >
    >
    > I freeze the tough stems that I break off of asparagus prior to
    > cooking
    > them. The frozen ones come out of the freezer nice and soft. I
    > pressure
    > cook those, then run them thru the victorio to get all that lovely
    > asparagus mush to make a cream of asparagus soup.


    There stock pot material for me, in season

    >
    >
    > I add fresh chopped, tender asparagus to that for texture. ;-d
    >
    > It's a lot of work, I don't do it very often.


    Me either, i have cut way back on my cooking over the last 3 years.
    Course that does leave me more time to talk about it.---
    JL

    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
    > Nicholson
     
  15. -L.

    -L. Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > At Trader Joe's today.
    >
    > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    >
    > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    >
    > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    >
    > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    >
    > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."


    I tend to buy Pacific brand as it is more carrot-onion and less
    tomato-y than others. I, too, have to keep track of salt - I forget
    what it is, but IIRC, it's on the low side.

    -L.
     
  16. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote in news:43FAA3A9.4352ED64
    @pacbell.net:

    > I wonder if that would be the same thing as what i call a 'food mill' a
    > sauce pan like thing with a conical strainer in the bottom and a blade
    > that is turned in the pan, cranked by hand to mash veggies and extract
    > juices. I used to use this on blanched veggies for various creme soups
    > and sauces but now a days use my mini prep food processor.



    It's called either a food mill or a foley mill. I use it for finishing pea
    soup and making mashed potatoes.

    Andy
     
  17. Dee Randall

    Dee Randall Guest

    "Andy" <q> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote in news:43FAA3A9.4352ED64
    > @pacbell.net:
    >
    >> I wonder if that would be the same thing as what i call a 'food mill' a
    >> sauce pan like thing with a conical strainer in the bottom and a blade
    >> that is turned in the pan, cranked by hand to mash veggies and extract
    >> juices. I used to use this on blanched veggies for various creme soups
    >> and sauces but now a days use my mini prep food processor.

    >
    >
    > It's called either a food mill or a foley mill. I use it for finishing pea
    > soup and making mashed potatoes.
    >
    > Andy


    And, what a mess to take apart and clean. Mine is sitting in storage. I'll
    use it, but mainly for skinning tomatoes; now that IS a mess. It's been
    years.
    Dee Dee
     
  18. In article <[email protected]>,
    Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:

    > >
    > > I'll pressure cook veggies after slicing them into medium slices, then
    > >
    > > just drop them into a screen strainer and mashthem down to get all the
    > >
    > > juice. I'll then discard those, and add fresh veggies to the stock,
    > > then
    > > cook them lightly.
    > >
    > > If I want to extract the "mush" for a creamy type soup, I use the
    > > Victorio strainer. :) Those that don't own one of those can use a
    > > China
    > > Cap.

    >
    > I wonder if that would be the same thing as what i call a 'food mill' a
    > sauce pan like thing with a conical strainer in the bottom and a blade
    > that is turned in the pan, cranked by hand to mash veggies and extract
    > juices. I used to use this on blanched veggies for various creme soups
    > and sauces but now a days use my mini prep food processor.


    I think it's a little different.
    It's also suitable for making jelly as it'll extract pure juice,
    removing skins and seeds. Mom used it for wild grapes and dewberries as
    well:

    http://www.kitchenemporium.com/cgi-bin/kitchen/prod/vw200.html

    It's awesome for tomatoes as it not only will skin them for you, it'll
    de-seed.

    >
    > >
    > >
    > > I freeze the tough stems that I break off of asparagus prior to
    > > cooking
    > > them. The frozen ones come out of the freezer nice and soft. I
    > > pressure
    > > cook those, then run them thru the victorio to get all that lovely
    > > asparagus mush to make a cream of asparagus soup.

    >
    > There stock pot material for me, in season


    That works too. :)
    'specially when they drop below $2.00 per lb.
    As you said, in season.

    >
    > >
    > >
    > > I add fresh chopped, tender asparagus to that for texture. ;-d
    > >
    > > It's a lot of work, I don't do it very often.

    >
    > Me either, i have cut way back on my cooking over the last 3 years.
    > Course that does leave me more time to talk about it.---
    > JL


    I keep it simple during the week, and save more complex stuff for
    weekends, or vacation time.
    --
    Peace, Om.

    "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack Nicholson
     
  19. OmManiPadmeOmelet wrote:

    > In article <[email protected]>,
    > Joseph Littleshoes <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > > I freeze the tough stems that I break off of asparagus prior to
    > > > cooking
    > > > them. The frozen ones come out of the freezer nice and soft. I
    > > > pressure
    > > > cook those, then run them thru the victorio to get all that lovely

    >
    > > > asparagus mush to make a cream of asparagus soup.

    > >
    > > There stock pot material for me, in season

    >
    > That works too. :)
    > 'specially when they drop below $2.00 per lb.
    > As you said, in season.


    "In season" we often get the asparagus for anything from 69 cent to 1
    dollar a pound around here from local truck farms.

    I was never particularly impressed with asparagus, as an excuse to make
    a hollandaise it is admirable but otherwise...while it has IMO a good
    flavour, it is too, too delicate to impress me.

    I make it a lot in season as it is one of the 'elderly relatives'
    favourite foods, probly my favourite way is very lightly blanched in
    boiling, seasoned vinegar. Then cooled immediately and used as an
    ingredient in a pasta salad with a vinaigrette dressing. Not to bad in
    a cheese omelette either.

    They have, when almost raw a very good texture.

    >
    >
    > >
    > > >
    > > >
    > > > I add fresh chopped, tender asparagus to that for texture. ;-d
    > > >
    > > > It's a lot of work, I don't do it very often.

    > >
    > > Me either, i have cut way back on my cooking over the last 3 years.
    > > Course that does leave me more time to talk about it.---
    > > JL

    >
    > I keep it simple during the week, and save more complex stuff for
    > weekends, or vacation time.


    I have recently started cooking stir fried dishes, very quick, very
    good, and very simple.

    Last knight after cooking a whole onion cut into large dice in dark
    sesame oil till the onion was lightly browned i added cut up raw breast
    of chicken, cooked this till almost 3/4 done, and added cut up broccoli
    and green pepper, 2 cloves of mashed garlic & cooked till the chicken
    was done and the veggies lightly sautéed.

    Having warmed the previously cooked rice noodles and plated them, i
    sprinkled a few drops of sesame oil over the noodles, added the meat and
    veggie mix on to the top of the noodles and over that sprinkled some of
    this new mushroom flavoured "dark" soy sauce (best soy sauce i have ever
    had "pearl river bridge" brand). I encouraged the 'elderly relative' to
    toss her noodles and meat mix to combine all the ingredients and it was
    superb.

    I have been asked to add this to the repertoire, and tonight i am going
    to do the same thing but am soon going out to get some ginger root and
    more garlic, probly some cauliflower and more sweet peppers. I shall
    purchase some "5 spice" mix and look at other condiments and spices
    readily available in my area.

    I already use a commercial "banana sauce" and a very nice garlic chilli
    sauce. The banana sauce is the ""elderly relatives" favourite as she
    has a pronounced sweet tooth and the banana sauce is a sweet hot sauce,
    though very mild for a 'hot sauce'.

    I want to do beef this way but severely limit my intake of red meats. I
    have a whole tilapia in the freezer and am thinking some fish done this
    way will be very good.

    But above every thing else including the really wonderful flavours, this
    is for me an easy and quick way of making very good food. I have
    mentioned here before, a recent disability of the last few years that
    makes it difficult for me to stand, and so this quick cooking of good
    fresh foods is especially appealing to me.

    Im 'flying by the seat of my pants' here and really should purchase a
    good Asian cook book.

    More often than not i keep a sharp eye out for what the Asians in our
    local "Chinatown" are buying and follow suit and improvise.

    I recently discovered a Chinese butcher that makes "sausages" which i am
    assured are traditionally spiced according to Chinese methods, i am most
    anxious to try them.
    ---
    JL

    > --
    > Peace, Om.
    >
    > "My mother never saw the irony in calling me a son-of-a-bitch." -Jack
    > Nicholson
     
  20. jmcquown

    jmcquown Guest

    Andy wrote:
    > At Trader Joe's today.
    >
    > Kitchen Basics had 5 vegetables in theirs for $2.49.
    >
    > Trader Joe's had 8 and more seasonsing and organic for $1.99
    >
    > All other nutrients were equal. Sodium 300mg/1 cup. Boo-hiss.
    >
    > I bought my bifocals and could actually read the nutrition labels.
    >
    > Trader Joe's with more veggies (flavor) for less $$$. A "NO BRAINER."
    >
    > Andy


    Hmmm, you're talking about store-bought vegetable broth. I'd say the no
    brainer would be to make your own. Quite often vegetable discards such as
    carrot tops, various greens, broccoli stems, pieces of carrot, etc. have
    been discussed to toss into a pot to with water make broth or stock.
    Pepper, salt, some selected herbs and you have more than just a can or two
    of broth for less than whatever that is at Trader Joe's.

    But then again, see, I don't have Trader Joes or Kitchen Basics stores here,
    so once again we're talking about what is available vs. what you might run
    out and buy in a can of or a carton.

    Jill
     
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