Velcro free rack trunk?



Howdy:
After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
due to worn out Velcro -- and listening just now to one manufacturer's
representative tell me he can't put an old pack through for warrantee
service but will sell me a new one for 40% off, I am now looking for a
rack trunk that does NOT use velcro closures to attach to a rear rack!
Unfortunately, on this particular bike and with this particular
rider, and some very strange experiences whilst hauling the thing on
and off the local streetcars, handlebar bags or saddlebags are not
viable options. Otherwise I'd take off the rear rack and go with a big
saddlebag in the back and a lowrider front rack for the big grocery
runs.
Thanks in advance!

Robert Leone [email protected] "Only YOU Can Prevent Long Sig Files."
 
M

mark

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote
> Unfortunately, on this particular bike and with this particular
> rider, and some very strange experiences whilst hauling the thing on
> and off the local streetcars, handlebar bags or saddlebags are not
> viable options. Otherwise I'd take off the rear rack and go with a big
> saddlebag in the back and a lowrider front rack for the big grocery
> runs.


Are you saying that you can't use panniers (hang off the sides of the rack)
or you can't use seatbags (hang off loops on the saddle like a Carradice
Nelson)? I've heard both items referred to as saddlebags. I've hauled
pannier bikes with panniers, seatbags and handlebar bags on and off of
various British commuter trains, usually with a fair bit of effort (maybe I
should travel lighter). What problems did you encounter?
--
mark
 
mark wrote:
Stuff below!

I DO use panniers when I'm carrying big/extra loads -- such as cabbage
and computers, broccoli and books. The rack trunk is for the "I always
want to have this with me" stuff -- such as rain gear, tube, tire
patches, pump, tools, lights (I'm now running a blinker and two steady
lights forward, two blinkers and a steady light aft -- and those new
Shimano dynamo hubs are beginning to look like a lovely addition to the
collection), extra locks (I park downtown), the full-finger
wind-resistant insulated gloves, hand sanitizer, chopsticks etc. Due to
local anti Punk Rocker/homeless vagrant prejudice on the part of some
local merchants, nice traditional saddlebags are not an option. They
look too much like military surplus musette bags when off the bike --
and when I park the thing for hours at a time while at the movies I'd
hate to leave too much ON the bike. As for the handlebar bag, the
easiest way for most cyclists (self included) to board the San Diego
Trolley is to heave the bike head-first up the stairs and follow after,
and I have seen one example of someone trying to rifle the contents of
a handlebar bag before the owner/operator heaved herself after the
bike. I'm also a bit sensitive to what handlebar bags may do to
steering (although if I went with lowrider racks I'd have to deal with
that while carrying loads anyway). Also, it'd take a few extra parts
here and there to mount the headlght collection in conjunction with a
handlebar bag.

Rack trunks look enough like a camera bag to make the loss prevention
teams ease off.

Vocabulary time: In my original post, by "saddlebag" I meant a bag
depending from, and attached to, saddle rails or loops and seatpost --
whether or not an additional support was used. What Mark, in his post,
called "seatbags." Part of the confusion may come from marketing terms
or descriptions of panniers modeled after the style of "saddlebags" as
used by equestrians.

> Are you saying that you can't use panniers (hang off the sides of the rack)
> or you can't use seatbags (hang off loops on the saddle like a Carradice
> Nelson)? I've heard both items referred to as saddlebags. I've hauled
> pannier bikes with panniers, seatbags and handlebar bags on and off of
> various British commuter trains, usually with a fair bit of effort (maybe I
> should travel lighter). What problems did you encounter?
> --
> mark


I snipped the original post, but it's out there.

Robert Leone [email protected]
 
M

mark

Guest
<[email protected]> wrote ...
>
> I DO use panniers when I'm carrying big/extra loads -- such as cabbage
> and computers, broccoli and books. The rack trunk is for the "I always
> want to have this with me" stuff -- such as rain gear, tube, tire
> patches, pump, tools, lights (I'm now running a blinker and two steady
> lights forward, two blinkers and a steady light aft -- and those new
> Shimano dynamo hubs are beginning to look like a lovely addition to the
> collection), extra locks (I park downtown), the full-finger
> wind-resistant insulated gloves, hand sanitizer, chopsticks etc. Due to
> local anti Punk Rocker/homeless vagrant prejudice on the part of some
> local merchants, nice traditional saddlebags are not an option. They
> look too much like military surplus musette bags when off the bike --
> and when I park the thing for hours at a time while at the movies I'd
> hate to leave too much ON the bike. As for the handlebar bag, the
> easiest way for most cyclists (self included) to board the San Diego
> Trolley is to heave the bike head-first up the stairs and follow after,
> and I have seen one example of someone trying to rifle the contents of
> a handlebar bag before the owner/operator heaved herself after the
> bike. I'm also a bit sensitive to what handlebar bags may do to
> steering (although if I went with lowrider racks I'd have to deal with
> that while carrying loads anyway). Also, it'd take a few extra parts
> here and there to mount the headlght collection in conjunction with a
> handlebar bag.
>
> Rack trunks look enough like a camera bag to make the loss prevention
> teams ease off.
>
> Vocabulary time: In my original post, by "saddlebag" I meant a bag
> depending from, and attached to, saddle rails or loops and seatpost --
> whether or not an additional support was used. What Mark, in his post,
> called "seatbags." Part of the confusion may come from marketing terms
> or descriptions of panniers modeled after the style of "saddlebags" as
> used by equestrians.
>
> Robert Leone [email protected]
>


You seem to cycle in a much rougher neighborhood than I do. At any rate,
Ortlieb offers a very nice looking rack trunk that does not appear to rely
on velcro, especially if you get Ortlieb's own mounting adapter to go with
it. Not cheap, but you get what you pay for. I've never seen the rack trunk
in question except on the Ortlieb website. However, I've been sufficiently
impressed with my Ortlieb panniers, handlebar bag and seat pack / saddlebag
that I would order any Ortlieb product off the website with complete
confidence. Most Ortlieb products look elegant enough to reassure the loss
prevention teams, IMO.
http://www.ortliebusa.com/cartgenie/prodInfo.asp?pid=38&cid=2

BTW, those new Shimano dynamo hubs ARE nice. I've been using the DH-3N71
with a Busch & Muller Lumotec mounted on the fork crown since August, it's
made my nightly commute very pleasant. I'm running a 3W bulb in the Lumotec
and battery LED lights in back, just to simplify swapping the system between
bikes.
--
mark
 
A

amakyonin

Guest
If a new rack is an option, Topeak and Trek have proprietary rack
systems that have clip on trunk bags. There are also bags that attach
directly to the seatpost. You could just sew on some new velcro or
cobble together some hardware to mechanically attach your existing bags
to the rack.
 
S

SMS

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Howdy:
> After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
> due to worn out Velcro -- and listening just now to one manufacturer's
> representative tell me he can't put an old pack through for warrantee
> service but will sell me a new one for 40% off, I am now looking for a
> rack trunk that does NOT use velcro closures to attach to a rear rack!


Many of us have had similar problems with those damn Velcro straps on
rack trunks. I vowed no more Velcro rack trunks!

The solution is the Lone Peak RP-700. This is the only solution I've found.

You can see one on one of my bicycles at
"http://nordicgroup.us/s78/images/img_0279.jpg"

Lickbike sells them for $50, see
"http://www.lickbike.com/productpage.aspx?PART_NUM_SUB='3648-11'"

I bought one at a local bike shop for less than that, during a 15% off
sale, but few bicycle shops carry them.

However, you could take the rack trunk to a place that does sewing
repairs, and have them replace the Velcro. I'd bet that it wouldn't be
more than $10 if you provided them with the material.
 
G

Gooserider

Guest
"amakyonin" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> If a new rack is an option, Topeak and Trek have proprietary rack
> systems that have clip on trunk bags. There are also bags that attach
> directly to the seatpost. You could just sew on some new velcro or
> cobble together some hardware to mechanically attach your existing bags
> to the rack.


I have Topeak racks on two of my bikes. Their system is very easy to use,
and very convenient.
 
B

Bob

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Howdy:
> After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
> due to worn out Velcro -- and listening just now to one manufacturer's
> representative tell me he can't put an old pack through for warrantee
> service but will sell me a new one for 40% off, I am now looking for a
> rack trunk that does NOT use velcro closures to attach to a rear rack!
> Unfortunately, on this particular bike and with this particular
> rider, and some very strange experiences whilst hauling the thing on
> and off the local streetcars, handlebar bags or saddlebags are not
> viable options. Otherwise I'd take off the rear rack and go with a big
> saddlebag in the back and a lowrider front rack for the big grocery
> runs.
> Thanks in advance!
>
> Robert Leone [email protected] "Only YOU Can Prevent Long Sig Files."


If the problem is worn out hook and loop surfaces on the straps you can
stop at any fabric store and pick up heavy duty rivet-on snaps. They
are cheap, useful for all kinds of stuff, sturdy, install with just a
hammer, and easy to replace if they fail. OTOH, if the straps
themselves are shot you're SOL.

Regards,
Bob Hunt
 
D

Dennis P. Harris

Guest
On 1 Dec 2005 08:54:00 -0800 in rec.bicycles.misc,
[email protected] wrote:

> After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
> due to worn out Velcro


why? replacing the velcro is not rocket science, it's simple
sewing. you are really making a mountain out of a molehill.
 
T

The Wogster

Guest
[email protected] wrote:
> Howdy:
> After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
> due to worn out Velcro -- and listening just now to one manufacturer's
> representative tell me he can't put an old pack through for warrantee
> service but will sell me a new one for 40% off, I am now looking for a
> rack trunk that does NOT use velcro closures to attach to a rear rack!
> Unfortunately, on this particular bike and with this particular
> rider, and some very strange experiences whilst hauling the thing on
> and off the local streetcars, handlebar bags or saddlebags are not
> viable options. Otherwise I'd take off the rear rack and go with a big
> saddlebag in the back and a lowrider front rack for the big grocery
> runs.


Take your old bag to a dry-cleaner or tailoring shop, the kind place
that hems pants, they should be able to easily replace that worn out
Velcro, should be no more then a 10 minute job, maybe $10 or so. Any
sewing store should be able to sell you the materials, if the sewing
place doesn't have any. Buy a roll of the stuff, the sewing place can
cut off enough to do the job, and give the rest of the roll back to you.

You could also take a sewing class at a local school, and just replace
as needed.

W
 
S

SMS

Guest
Bob wrote:
> [email protected] wrote:
>> Howdy:
>> After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
>> due to worn out Velcro -- and listening just now to one manufacturer's
>> representative tell me he can't put an old pack through for warrantee
>> service but will sell me a new one for 40% off, I am now looking for a
>> rack trunk that does NOT use velcro closures to attach to a rear rack!
>> Unfortunately, on this particular bike and with this particular
>> rider, and some very strange experiences whilst hauling the thing on
>> and off the local streetcars, handlebar bags or saddlebags are not
>> viable options. Otherwise I'd take off the rear rack and go with a big
>> saddlebag in the back and a lowrider front rack for the big grocery
>> runs.
>> Thanks in advance!
>>
>> Robert Leone [email protected] "Only YOU Can Prevent Long Sig Files."

>
> If the problem is worn out hook and loop surfaces on the straps you can
> stop at any fabric store and pick up heavy duty rivet-on snaps. They
> are cheap, useful for all kinds of stuff, sturdy, install with just a
> hammer, and easy to replace if they fail. OTOH, if the straps
> themselves are shot you're SOL.


That's the problem I've had with the velcro type bags, even the higher
end U.S. made ones. The straps deteriorate to the point that there is no
place to sew on replacement fasteners. I guess it would be possible to
completely replace the straps, down to where they attach to the pack,
with a commercial sewing machine.
 
SMS wrote:
> Bob wrote:
> > [email protected] wrote:
> >> Howdy:
> >> After having to retire a few rack trunks over the past two decades
> >> due to worn out Velcro -- and listening just now to one manufacturer's
> >> representative tell me he can't put an old pack through for warrantee
> >> service but will sell me a new one for 40% off, I am now looking for a
> >> rack trunk that does NOT use velcro closures to attach to a rear rack!
> >> Unfortunately, on this particular bike and with this particular
> >> rider, and some very strange experiences whilst hauling the thing on
> >> and off the local streetcars, handlebar bags or saddlebags are not
> >> viable options. Otherwise I'd take off the rear rack and go with a big
> >> saddlebag in the back and a lowrider front rack for the big grocery
> >> runs.
> >> Thanks in advance!
> >>
> >> Robert Leone [email protected] "Only YOU Can Prevent Long Sig Files."

> >
> > If the problem is worn out hook and loop surfaces on the straps you can
> > stop at any fabric store and pick up heavy duty rivet-on snaps. They
> > are cheap, useful for all kinds of stuff, sturdy, install with just a
> > hammer, and easy to replace if they fail. OTOH, if the straps
> > themselves are shot you're SOL.

>
> That's the problem I've had with the velcro type bags, even the higher
> end U.S. made ones. The straps deteriorate to the point that there is no
> place to sew on replacement fasteners. I guess it would be possible to
> completely replace the straps, down to where they attach to the pack,
> with a commercial sewing machine.


A local shoe repair shop did something like this for my panniers last
year. Cost almost nothing and a lovely job.
John Kane, Kingston ON Canada
 
Z

Zoot Katz

Guest
On Sat, 03 Dec 2005 22:41:27 -0800, SMS <[email protected]>
wrote:

>I guess it would be possible to
>completely replace the straps, down to where they attach to the pack,
>with a commercial sewing machine.


If your cobbler does luggage repair, it would be a job for them.
--
zk
 
D

Dennis P. Harris

Guest
On Sun, 04 Dec 2005 14:00:27 -0800 in rec.bicycles.misc, Zoot
Katz <[email protected]> wrote:

> If your cobbler does luggage repair, it would be a job for them.


or you can always try sailmakers or boat canvas shops, since they
usually have heavy duty sewing machines. up here in alaska, i've
had good luck with sled dog harness folks doing repairs to my
panniers.

it's certainly silly to throw out a good bag because the velcro
or straps are worn. my first nashbar rack truck went through
several repairs, including a new top, before it finally wore
through and had to be repaired by the new "improved" much smaller
one i have now.