Velocity Rim Question

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by PeterF, Jan 19, 2009.

  1. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    I have a set of Velocity Aerohead/OC built on Record hubs. I love them. They are fast, smooth, and pretty much bombproof. I have been dabbling with a similar set up only tubular. Does Velocity make the Escape in an OC (off center) design like the aeroheads? If not, how do the standard rims work with Campy hubs? Also, I seem to only see the Escape in 24, 28 and 32 hole. At 95-100 kg I would prefer 36h. My Aeroheads have been fine for over a year with 32h rims, but would like a set of 36's for my next set.
     
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  2. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    No they don't. The Escape is a derivative of the aerohead front, not rear.
    No 36h. I wouldn't build a set of 32 Escapes for you at 220 pounds.

    Not a lot of tubular 36h rims out there. Mavic Reflex, maybe Ambrosio, box section tubular rim. I can get you Mavic Mach II CDs in 36h for $100 per but 100 grams heavier at 480 grams per
     
  3. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    Thanks Peter. It's interesting that they don't make a 36h.
     
  4. Peter@vecchios

    [email protected] New Member

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    AS a guy that's also .1 offa ton, I agree. All my wheels are 36h.
     
  5. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    Frankly at 220 I wouldn't hesitate to ride 32 spoke wheels. I weigh 350 and ride 36 spoke wheels, I think at 2/3 the weight a reduction of 4 spokes could be reasonable. ;-)

    This is especially true if you use a rim that isn't a feather weight racing rim... I don't know about tubular rims specifically, but in general a deep section rim is able to handle rider weight better. The clydesdales in a Clydesdale forum I read swear by the Velocity Deep V for clinchers.
     
  6. Peter@vecchios

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    Mostly cuz the rims are 550 gram or more. As I mentioned, I wouldn't build a set of 32h Escapes for this gent using rims that weigh 380 grams. No such thing as a free lunch. light rim, low number of spokes, thin spokes=unreliable wheel.
     
  7. parawolf

    parawolf New Member

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    Very sensible opinion. Saving the less than 200 grams per wheel, when someone weighs over 200lbs (not saying a bad thing) is a receipe for a poor service life.
     
  8. PeterF

    PeterF New Member

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    For a big guy, I am not particularly hard on wheels. The roads I ride are generally pretty smooth, and I ride a lot of solo rides so I'm not oftne surprised by pot holes that weren't pointed out in a pace line. The 32h Aeorheads have lasted about 15 months so far with out being so muchas a mm out of true. In winter I run 26 mm tires to cushion the rims a bit more against the tougher road surfaces but overall I'm happy with the 32's and they are pretty light. That being said my next set will be more of a training wheel and would like to run a larger tubie on a 36h wheel. FWIW, if there is any speed difference at all for a guy of my weight between 23mm tires at 115-120 and 26mm at 95-100psi, I'm yet to notice it. I don't get a lot of flats with either (knock knock), but when i finish with my 23mm tires that I bought in bulk last year, I'm switching to 25mm.
     
  9. dgregory57

    dgregory57 New Member

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    I saw the rim profile, and did not look at the weight. It definitely is a much lighter rim. I know that the depth of the profile is not the only aspect of a rim that would impact the strength of the rim, but just didn't look.

    I personally don't ride anything but a nice solid rim, and nothing that is considered light weight unless compared to an old chromed steel rim. ;)
     
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