Very OT: Fever or not?

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Wayne Boatwright, Apr 2, 2005.

  1. When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very feverish.
    Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually "subnormal", e.g.,
    96.7 degrees F.

    Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
    Tags:


  2. Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    wrote:

    >When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very feverish.
    >Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually "subnormal", e.g.,
    >96.7 degrees F.


    You may have a low normal temperature. When I'm healthy, mine is 96.8.
    You might want to take your temp a few times when you're feeling well, to
    establish a baseline.

    >Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?


    No idea why, but yes, it does happen to me, too.

    Carol
    --
    Coming at you live, from beautiful Lake Woebegon
     
  3. Jessica V.

    Jessica V. Guest

    Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very feverish.
    > Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually "subnormal", e.g.,
    > 96.7 degrees F.
    >
    > Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?
    >


    Have you calibrated that thermometer in boiling water at sea level? ;)
    What's your normal body temp with the thermometer in question when you
    are well? My normal temp is 97.0 (cold hearted bitch and all) if my
    temp hits "normal" I'm in sorry shape.

    I'd question the thermometer.

    Jessica
     
  4. BOB

    BOB Guest

    Jessica V. wrote:
    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >> feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >> "subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    >>
    >> Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?


    My "normal" "well" temperature is 98.1°F, so if I'm at 98.6 which is
    considered "normal" in the medical community, I have a slight feaver.
    I sure do hope that the 96.7 that you wrote above was just an example,
    or that your thermometer is just plain wrong. That sounds way too low
    to not need immediate medical attention.

    >>

    >
    > Have you calibrated that thermometer in boiling water at sea level?
    > ;)
    > What's your normal body temp with the thermometer in question when
    > you
    > are well? My normal temp is 97.0 (cold hearted bitch and all) if
    > my
    > temp hits "normal" I'm in sorry shape.
    >
    > I'd question the thermometer.
    >
    > Jessica


    I don't think that I'd stick my thermometer in boiling water...most
    made for taking temperature of humans will only go to about 103°F, and
    will break if the mercury type, or can lose calebration if subjected
    to 212°F temperatures.

    BOB
     
  5. On Sat 02 Apr 2005 08:46:05p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in
    rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real name,
    > wrote:
    >
    >>When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >>feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >>"subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.

    >
    > You may have a low normal temperature. When I'm healthy, mine is 96.8.
    > You might want to take your temp a few times when you're feeling well,
    > to establish a baseline.


    You may be ( and probably are) correct. I've just never thought of
    checking my temperature when I'm feeling well. I must remember to do this,
    as this has puzzled me for years.


    >>Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    >
    > No idea why, but yes, it does happen to me, too.


    Then I'm in good company!

    > Carol


    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  6. On Sat 02 Apr 2005 08:49:38p, Jessica V. wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >> feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >> "subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    >>
    >> Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?
    >>

    >
    > Have you calibrated that thermometer in boiling water at sea level? ;)
    > What's your normal body temp with the thermometer in question when you
    > are well? My normal temp is 97.0 (cold hearted bitch and all) if my
    > temp hits "normal" I'm in sorry shape.
    >
    > I'd question the thermometer.


    I've never thought to calibrate the termometer, but I doubt it could
    withstand 212 degrees F., since it's design is for bodily temperature.

    My current thermometer is a digital, as was it's predecessor, and before
    that a mercury bulb model. My experience with all of them is the same.

    Could be that my "normal" temp is below 98.6, but I've never thought to
    check. I need to do this.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  7. On Sat 02 Apr 2005 09:04:45p, BOB wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > Jessica V. wrote:
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >>> When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >>> feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >>> "subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    >>>
    >>> Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    >
    > My "normal" "well" temperature is 98.1°F, so if I'm at 98.6 which is
    > considered "normal" in the medical community, I have a slight feaver.
    > I sure do hope that the 96.7 that you wrote above was just an example,
    > or that your thermometer is just plain wrong. That sounds way too low
    > to not need immediate medical attention.


    96.7 was the actual reading about an hour ago. I need to check my
    "normal" temp, but I never remember to do so. These subnormal temps have
    been common with me all my life using various thermometers.

    >>>

    >>
    >> Have you calibrated that thermometer in boiling water at sea level?
    >> ;)
    >> What's your normal body temp with the thermometer in question when
    >> you are well? My normal temp is 97.0 (cold hearted bitch and all) if
    >> my temp hits "normal" I'm in sorry shape.
    >>
    >> I'd question the thermometer.
    >>
    >> Jessica

    >
    > I don't think that I'd stick my thermometer in boiling water...most
    > made for taking temperature of humans will only go to about 103°F, and
    > will break if the mercury type, or can lose calebration if subjected
    > to 212°F temperatures.
    >
    > BOB
    >
    >




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  8. Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very

    feverish.
    > Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually "subnormal",

    e.g.,
    > 96.7 degrees F.
    >
    > Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?



    Yes, and it's inexplicable to me. There have been a few times when
    I've felt sick with a slight fever and took my temperature. *Below*
    normal and the mercury won't move even if I keep the thermometer in my
    mouth for a longish time. Also happens with a digital thermometer.
    One possibility for you is that if you take your temp soon after
    getting out of bed it'll be lower than normal....so if you're been
    napping and take your temp.....frankly, it doesn't seem to make any
    difference for me but maybe for you? :)

    Mac
     
  9. Mash

    Mash Guest

    My body temp usually runs around 97.4 although dropping to 96.4 is not
    abnormal. The lowest it's ever been was 95 degrees and I was able to
    donate blood, but just barely. The hottest I've ever been was 105
    degrees when I was knocked out with a bad case of the flu. I probably
    should have gone to the doctor but I was too sick to get out of bed.

    And yes I've felt the way you do when stuck with a nasty cold. It's
    strange cold/clammy/hot feeling.

    Mary

    [email protected] wrote:
    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > > When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very

    > feverish.
    > > Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually

    "subnormal",
    > e.g.,
    > > 96.7 degrees F.
    > >
    > > Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    >
    >
    > Yes, and it's inexplicable to me. There have been a few times when
    > I've felt sick with a slight fever and took my temperature. *Below*
    > normal and the mercury won't move even if I keep the thermometer in

    my
    > mouth for a longish time. Also happens with a digital thermometer.
    > One possibility for you is that if you take your temp soon after
    > getting out of bed it'll be lower than normal....so if you're been
    > napping and take your temp.....frankly, it doesn't seem to make any
    > difference for me but maybe for you? :)
    >
    > Mac
     
  10. On Sat 02 Apr 2005 09:28:57p, wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    >
    > Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >> feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >> "subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    >>
    >> Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    >
    >
    > Yes, and it's inexplicable to me. There have been a few times when
    > I've felt sick with a slight fever and took my temperature. *Below*
    > normal and the mercury won't move even if I keep the thermometer in my
    > mouth for a longish time. Also happens with a digital thermometer.
    > One possibility for you is that if you take your temp soon after
    > getting out of bed it'll be lower than normal....so if you're been
    > napping and take your temp.....frankly, it doesn't seem to make any
    > difference for me but maybe for you? :)
    >
    > Mac


    No, not the reason, but point well taken. I've had actual high
    temperatures a few times in my life, anywhere between 101-102.6, and at the
    high end, almost delirious, but more often than not, it's low.

    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  11. On Sat 02 Apr 2005 09:36:16p, Mash wrote in rec.food.cooking:

    > My body temp usually runs around 97.4 although dropping to 96.4 is not
    > abnormal. The lowest it's ever been was 95 degrees and I was able to
    > donate blood, but just barely. The hottest I've ever been was 105
    > degrees when I was knocked out with a bad case of the flu. I probably
    > should have gone to the doctor but I was too sick to get out of bed.
    >
    > And yes I've felt the way you do when stuck with a nasty cold. It's
    > strange cold/clammy/hot feeling.


    That's certainly an apt description. Just the way I feel.

    > Mary
    >
    > [email protected] wrote:
    >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    >> > When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >> > feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >> > "subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    >> >
    >> > Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    >>
    >>
    >> Yes, and it's inexplicable to me. There have been a few times when
    >> I've felt sick with a slight fever and took my temperature. *Below*
    >> normal and the mercury won't move even if I keep the thermometer in my
    >> mouth for a longish time. Also happens with a digital thermometer.
    >> One possibility for you is that if you take your temp soon after
    >> getting out of bed it'll be lower than normal....so if you're been
    >> napping and take your temp.....frankly, it doesn't seem to make any
    >> difference for me but maybe for you? :)
    >>
    >> Mac

    >
    >




    --
    Wayne Boatwright
    ____________________________________________

    Give me a smart idiot over a stupid genius any day.
    Sam Goldwyn, 1882-1974
     
  12. In article <[email protected]>,
    Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote:

    > On Sat 02 Apr 2005 09:04:45p, BOB wrote in rec.food.cooking:
    >
    > > Jessica V. wrote:
    > >> Wayne Boatwright wrote:
    > >>> When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    > >>> feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    > >>> "subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    > >>>
    > >>> Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?

    > >
    > > My "normal" "well" temperature is 98.1°F, so if I'm at 98.6 which is
    > > considered "normal" in the medical community, I have a slight feaver.
    > > I sure do hope that the 96.7 that you wrote above was just an example,
    > > or that your thermometer is just plain wrong. That sounds way too low
    > > to not need immediate medical attention.

    >
    > 96.7 was the actual reading about an hour ago. I need to check my
    > "normal" temp, but I never remember to do so. These subnormal temps have
    > been common with me all my life using various thermometers.


    98.6 isn't really normal. If the story I heard is correct, it's just an
    old average that someone took. He did it in Celsius, giving 37 degrees.
    That gets translated into 98.6 in Farenheit, making it seem much more
    exact than it really is. Your temperature also tends to vary throughout
    the day.

    I'm not sure what the normal range is considered, but I'm pretty sure
    it's not a fever until you break 100.

    Aaron
     
  13. Wayne Boatwright wrote:

    > When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very feverish.
    > Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually "subnormal", e.g.,
    > 96.7 degrees F.
    >
    > Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?


    Sure. That 98.6 business is an average sort of thing. One of my kids
    stayed at 99.1 when she was little. My youngest usually reads 98.4. It's
    not unusual for temps to be off that "normal" 98.6.

    Check it in good health to see what your personal benchmark is.

    Pastorio
     
  14. Andy

    Andy Guest

    Dog3 <[email protected];ajklsd;ajlds.nutz> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> On Sat 02 Apr 2005 08:46:05p, Damsel in dis Dress wrote in
    >> rec.food.cooking:
    >>
    >>> Wayne Boatwright <[email protected]>, if that's their real
    >>> name, wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    >>>>feverish. Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually
    >>>>"subnormal", e.g., 96.7 degrees F.
    >>>
    >>> You may have a low normal temperature. When I'm healthy, mine is
    >>> 96.8. You might want to take your temp a few times when you're
    >>> feeling well, to establish a baseline.

    >>
    >> You may be ( and probably are) correct. I've just never thought of
    >> checking my temperature when I'm feeling well. I must remember to do
    >> this, as this has puzzled me for years.

    >
    > Not me. When I'm sick my temp goes waaaaay up. My temp is 98.7
    > normally. I have had a low temp when I'm sick and very cold but
    > usually it is high.
    >
    > Michael
    >
    >



    When I was hospitalized, they always take your temperature, and mine was
    always up to 100, but it was a false temperature!

    The bed I was in had a mattress cover that was made of some type of
    rubber, so when I was lying on it, there was no air circulation between
    the fitted sheet and the rubber cover, which caused me to sweat and raise
    my temperature. I told the nurses, but they didn't believe me.

    If I got out of bed, and sat in a chair, my temperature dropped to normal
    in 1/2 hour. One night I woke up in a pool of sweat (cooking around 102).
    When I sat in the chair while the nurses mopped up and changed the
    sheets, they realized what I was talking about. Didn't raise many
    eyebrows though. They just upped my pain med to shut me up. Fidiots!

    Andy

    --
    "What can possibly go wrong... go wrong... go wrong..."
    - Pop
     
  15. Ruddell

    Ruddell Guest

    In <[email protected]> Andy wrote:

    > When I was hospitalized, they always take your temperature, and mine
    > was always up to 100, but it was a false temperature!
    >
    > The bed I was in had a mattress cover that was made of some type of
    > rubber, so when I was lying on it, there was no air circulation
    > between the fitted sheet and the rubber cover, which caused me to
    > sweat and raise my temperature. I told the nurses, but they didn't
    > believe me.
    >
    > If I got out of bed, and sat in a chair, my temperature dropped to
    > normal in 1/2 hour. One night I woke up in a pool of sweat (cooking
    > around 102). When I sat in the chair while the nurses mopped up and
    > changed the sheets, they realized what I was talking about. Didn't
    > raise many eyebrows though. They just upped my pain med to shut me up.
    > Fidiots!


    Yeah I hear ya. Heck, even an expert in the kitchen will listen to
    outside help :)


    --
    Cheers

    Dennis

    Remove 'Elle-Kabong' to reply
     
  16. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Andy wrote:
    >
    > When I was hospitalized, they always take your temperature, and mine

    was
    > always up to 100, but it was a false temperature!
    >
    > The bed I was in had a mattress cover that was made of some type of
    > rubber, so when I was lying on it, there was no air circulation

    between
    > the fitted sheet and the rubber cover, which caused me to sweat and

    raise
    > my temperature. I told the nurses, but they didn't believe me.
    >
    > If I got out of bed, and sat in a chair, my temperature dropped to

    normal
    > in 1/2 hour. One night I woke up in a pool of sweat (cooking around

    102).
    > When I sat in the chair while the nurses mopped up and changed the
    > sheets, they realized what I was talking about. Didn't raise many
    > eyebrows though. They just upped my pain med to shut me up.


    That's because the medical staff knew that sweating lowered your
    temperature. Had you not been sweating your temperature would have
    been even higher. The cooling effect from evaporation is the main
    reason why people perspire, and lying in a pool of sweat lowered your
    temperature even further... they were obviously following hospital
    guidelines by being polite and not calling you a retard... but they
    were thinking it! <G>

    Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .

    Sheldon (gotta amuse his self, can't take much more inane pope poop)
     
  17. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Andy wrote:
    >
    > When I was hospitalized, they always take your temperature, and mine

    was
    > always up to 100, but it was a false temperature!
    >
    > The bed I was in had a mattress cover that was made of some type of
    > rubber, so when I was lying on it, there was no air circulation

    between
    > the fitted sheet and the rubber cover, which caused me to sweat and

    raise
    > my temperature. I told the nurses, but they didn't believe me.
    >
    > If I got out of bed, and sat in a chair, my temperature dropped to

    normal
    > in 1/2 hour. One night I woke up in a pool of sweat (cooking around

    102).
    > When I sat in the chair while the nurses mopped up and changed the
    > sheets, they realized what I was talking about. Didn't raise many
    > eyebrows though. They just upped my pain med to shut me up.


    That's because the medical staff knew that sweating lowered your
    temperature. Had you not been sweating your temperature would have
    been even higher. The cooling effect from evaporation is the main
    reason why people perspire, and lying in a pool of sweat lowered your
    temperature even further... they were obviously following hospital
    guidelines by being polite and not calling you a retard... but they
    were thinking it! <G>

    Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .

    Sheldon (gotta amuse his self, can't take much more inane pope poop)
     
  18. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Andy wrote:
    >
    > When I was hospitalized, they always take your temperature, and mine

    was
    > always up to 100, but it was a false temperature!
    >
    > The bed I was in had a mattress cover that was made of some type of
    > rubber, so when I was lying on it, there was no air circulation

    between
    > the fitted sheet and the rubber cover, which caused me to sweat and

    raise
    > my temperature. I told the nurses, but they didn't believe me.
    >
    > If I got out of bed, and sat in a chair, my temperature dropped to

    normal
    > in 1/2 hour. One night I woke up in a pool of sweat (cooking around

    102).
    > When I sat in the chair while the nurses mopped up and changed the
    > sheets, they realized what I was talking about. Didn't raise many
    > eyebrows though. They just upped my pain med to shut me up.


    That's because the medical staff knew that sweating lowered your
    temperature. Had you not been sweating your temperature would have
    been even higher. The cooling effect from evaporation is the main
    reason why people perspire, and lying in a pool of sweat lowered your
    temperature even further... they were obviously following hospital
    guidelines by being polite and not calling you a retard... but they
    were thinking it! <G>

    Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .

    Sheldon (gotta amuse his self, can't take much more inane pope poop)
     
  19. Sheldon

    Sheldon Guest

    Andy wrote:
    >
    > When I was hospitalized, they always take your temperature, and mine

    was
    > always up to 100, but it was a false temperature!
    >
    > The bed I was in had a mattress cover that was made of some type of
    > rubber, so when I was lying on it, there was no air circulation

    between
    > the fitted sheet and the rubber cover, which caused me to sweat and

    raise
    > my temperature. I told the nurses, but they didn't believe me.
    >
    > If I got out of bed, and sat in a chair, my temperature dropped to

    normal
    > in 1/2 hour. One night I woke up in a pool of sweat (cooking around

    102).
    > When I sat in the chair while the nurses mopped up and changed the
    > sheets, they realized what I was talking about. Didn't raise many
    > eyebrows though. They just upped my pain med to shut me up.


    That's because the medical staff knew that sweating lowered your
    temperature. Had you not been sweating your temperature would have
    been even higher. The cooling effect from evaporation is the main
    reason why people perspire, and lying in a pool of sweat lowered your
    temperature even further... they were obviously following hospital
    guidelines by being polite and not calling you a retard... but they
    were thinking it! <G>

    Ahahahahahahahahahaha. . . .

    Sheldon (gotta amuse his self, can't take much more inane pope poop)
     
  20. "Wayne Boatwright" wrote ...
    > When I have a bad cold (which I do now) or flu, I often feel very
    > feverish.
    > Yet, when I take my temperature, the reading is usually "subnormal", e.g.,
    > 96.7 degrees F.
    >
    > Anyone know why? Does this happen to anyone else?
    >


    Happens to me all the time, and I don't know why either. Heck, a couple
    years ago, I spend nearly 3 weeks in the hospital with a pneumoccal (sp?)
    infection, and my temperature never once got as high as 98, much less 98.6.

    Pam
     
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