very sore legs after my first race

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by [email protected], Feb 7, 2006.

  1. I ran my first race (a 10K) last sunday. I didn't really train for
    this, I just run once a week, but some friends talked me into entering
    the race, and so I gave it a try. It was much fun, but it gave me very
    sore legs ! The day after the race I could hardly walk, and now my
    quads and hamstrings still hurt. Is this normal ? Do people who are
    correctly trained for the race also get such sore legs ? And do you
    have any tips to prevent this, if I decide to enter another race ?
    thank you for your advices.
     
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  2. [email protected] wrote:
    > The day after the (10 km) race I could hardly walk, and now my
    > quads and hamstrings still hurt. Is this normal ? Do people who
    > are correctly trained for the race also get such sore legs ?


    No.


    > And do you have any tips to prevent this, if I decide to enter
    > another race ?


    Train for the race, or jog it slow enough that you don't get sore.
     
  3. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    [email protected] wrote:

    > I ran my first race (a 10K) last sunday. I didn't really train for
    > this, I just run once a week, but some friends talked me into entering
    > the race, and so I gave it a try. It was much fun, but it gave me very
    > sore legs ! The day after the race I could hardly walk, and now my
    > quads and hamstrings still hurt. Is this normal ?


    This is expected if you only run once a week. Especially if you have
    never run that distance or that pace or that combination of distance
    and pace. Unusual trauma to the leg muscles will cause DOMS (delayed
    onset muscle soreness).

    > Do people who are correctly trained for the race also get such sore legs ?


    As Charlie said, no. However, despite proper training you may feel it
    to a lesser degree, or maybe just dead legs. It certainly won't be
    painful or to the point where you can hardly walk. Probably nowhere
    near that bad. In training for a 10K most runners don't actually run a
    10K at 10K race pace, but you do over-distance running (longer than 10K
    at slower than race pace), and speed training (shorter intervals, but
    at race pace or faster). So even someone that is properly trained may
    feel some soreness because racing a 10K is a little bit different from
    training for one. Of course you'd have to very gradually work up to
    this sort of training program, especially if you're currently running
    once a week.

    > And do you have any tips to prevent this, if I decide to enter another race ?
    > thank you for your advices.


    There are lots of training programs out there. You should look for
    something that fits the beginner category. Also, some more background
    on you might be helpful. So far, all we know is that you run once a
    week. Do you exercise in any other way? Any medical problems? What is
    your age? Do you have any running history? Weight problems? Proper
    running shoes?

    --
    Phil M.
     
  4. I did something like this and ended up crippled for a year. Im just
    getting back into running. im 42 so that is part of the problem. id be
    very cautious. if it hurts, stop.
     
  5. On 10 Feb 2006 00:01:32 -0800, [email protected] wrote:

    >I did something like this and ended up crippled for a year. Im just
    >getting back into running. im 42 so that is part of the problem. id be
    >very cautious. if it hurts, stop.


    At your age, you should be dead.
     
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