Vitamin D creates more fat???

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Kev, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Kev

    Kev Guest

    Does anyone agree with this?

    However scientists still do not understand how calcium promotes fat reduction. Michael Zemel, a
    nutritionist at the University of Tennessee, suggests that it has to do with the actions of vitamin
    D. Data appear to show that the active form of vitamin D, called calcitriol, causes fat cells to
    create more fat. Calcitriol levels are raised with lower intake of calcium. Therefore, fat cells
    produce more fat on low calcium diets. By contrast, high-calcium diets suppress calcitriol and, as a
    consequence, promote the burning of fat.
     
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  2. Kev

    Kev Guest

    There are some studies on this...

    I want to know, does supplementing vitamin D affect fat cells in a negative way? Or, does that
    affect fat cells - its just something going on in the cell when extra calcium is taken?

    FASEB J. 2001 Dec;15(14):2751-3. Epub 2001 Oct 15.   1alpha,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D3 modulates human
    adipocyte metabolism via nongenomic action.

    Shi H, Norman AW, Okamura WH, Sen A, Zemel MB. University of Tennessee, Knoxville, Tennessee
    37996, USA.

    We reported recently that suppression of the renal 1alpha,25-dihyroxyvitamin D3 (1lpha,25-(OH)2-D3)
    production in aP2-agouti transgenic mice by increasing dietary calcium decreases adipocyte
    intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i), stimulates lipolysis, inhibits lipogenesis, and reduces adiposity.
    However, it was not clear whether this modulation of adipocyte metabolism by dietary calcium is a
    direct effect of inhibition of 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3-induced [Ca2+]i. Accordingly, we have now
    evaluated the direct role of 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3. Human adipocytes exhibited a 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3 dose-
    responsive (1-50 nM) increase in [Ca2+]i (P<0.01). This action was mimicked by 1alpha,25-
    dihyroxylumisterol3 (1alpha,25-(OH)2-lumisterol3) (P<0.001), a specific agonist for a putative
    membrane vitamin D receptor
    (mVDR), and completely prevented by 1b,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1beta,25-(OH)2-D3), a specific
    antagonist for the mVDR. Similarly, 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3 (5 nM) caused 50%-100% increases in
    adipocyte fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression and activity (P<0.02), a 61% increase in glycerol-3-
    phosphate dehydrogenase (GPDH) activity (P<0.01), and an 80% inhibition of isoproterenol-
    stimulated lipolysis (P<0.001), whereas 1beta,25-(OH)2-D3 completely blocked all these
    effects. Notably, 1alpha,25-(OH)2-lumisterol3 exerted more potent effects in modulating
    adipocyte lipid metabolism, with 2.5- to 3.0-fold increases in FAS expression and activity
    (P<0.001) and a threefold increase in GPDH activity (P<0.001). Also 1alpha,25-(OH)2-
    lumisterol3 was approximately twice as potent in inhibiting basal lipolysis (P<0.025), whereas
    1beta,25-(OH)2-D3 completely blocked all these effects. These data suggest that 1alpha,25-(OH)2-
    D3 modulates adipocyte Ca2+ signaling and, consequently, exerts a coordinated control over
    lipogenesis and lipolysis. Thus, a direct inhibition of 1alpha,25-(OH)2-D3-induced [Ca2+]i may
    contribute to an anti-obesity effect of dietary calcium, and the mVDR may represent an
    important target for obesity.

    J Am Coll Nutr. 2002 Apr;21(2):146S-151S.   Regulation of adiposity and obesity risk by dietary
    calcium: mechanisms and implications.

    Zemel MB. The University of Tennessee, Knoxville 37996, USA. [email protected]

    Dietary calcium plays a pivotal role in the regulation of energy metabolism; high calcium diets
    attenuate adipocyte lipid accretion and weight gain during periods of overconsumption of an energy-
    dense diet and increase lipolysis and preserve thermogenesis during caloric restriction, thereby
    markedly accelerating weight loss. Intracellular Ca2+ has a key role in regulating adipocyte lipid
    metabolism and triglyceride storage, with increased intracellular Ca2+ resulting in stimulation of
    lipogenic gene expression and lipogenesis, suppression of lipolysis, and increased lipid filling and
    adiposity. Moreover, we have recently demonstrated that the increased calcitriol released in
    response to low calcium diets stimulates Ca2+ influx in human adipocytes and thereby promotes
    adiposity. Accordingly, suppressing calcitriol levels by increasing dietary calcium is an attractive
    target for the prevention and management of obesity. In support of this concept, transgenic mice
    expressing the agouti gene specifically in adipocytes (a human-like pattern) respond to low calcium
    diets with accelerated weight gain and fat accretion, while high calcium diets markedly inhibit
    lipogenesis, accelerate lipolysis, increase thermogenesis and suppress fat accretion and weight gain
    in animals maintained at identical caloric intakes. Further, low calcium diets impede body fat loss,
    while high calcium diets markedly accelerate fat loss in transgenic mice subjected to caloric
    restriction. These findings are further supported by clinical and epidemiological data demonstrating
    a profound reduction in the odds of being obese associated with increasing dietary calcium intake.
    Notably, dairy sources of calcium exert a significantly greater anti-obesity effect than
    supplemental sources in each of these studies, possibly due to the effects of other bioactive
    compounds, such as the angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor
     
  3. cecelia

    cecelia Guest

    Kev ([email protected]) wrote:

    : Does anyone agree with this?

    What about the fact that we women are told to take calcium supplements that have added vitamin D for
    better absorption?

    margo
     
  4. John Claude

    John Claude Guest

    I read a recent news article about how more urban American kids are developing rickets, etc. from
    lack of Vitamin D. (Dickensian...) The ostensible cause seems to be a lack of sunlight, which is the
    best way (or at least a critical way) to get Vitamin D. Televisions are not yet packaged with a UV
    lamp, I guess. Fears of UV radiation and more sunscreen use are suspected. Problem is, we still need
    UV to convert Vitamin D. It's all about moderation. I think low calcium levels might contribute to
    lethargy, which won't help fat levels. I'm sure there are a lot more factors to consider than just a
    Vitamin D/Calcium balance in worrying about fat production, or overproduction. John Claude

    Kev <[email protected]> wrote in message news:BC6D2BA4.12069%[email protected]...
    >
    > Does anyone agree with this?
    >
    >
    >
    > However scientists still do not understand how calcium promotes fat reduction. Michael Zemel, a
    > nutritionist at the University of Tennessee, suggests that it has to do with the actions of
    > vitamin D. Data appear to show that the active form of vitamin D, called calcitriol, causes fat
    cells
    > to create more fat. Calcitriol levels are raised with lower intake of calcium. Therefore, fat
    > cells produce more fat on low calcium diets. By contrast, high-calcium diets suppress calcitriol
    > and, as a consequence, promote the burning of fat.
     
  5. Kev

    Kev Guest

    I have continued to look for information about this. Nowhere is it suggested that supplementing
    vitamin D has anything to do with this theory about intracellular vitamin D levels increasing fat. I
    guess a vitamin D deficiency might decrease fat this way, but you don't want to be deficient, of
    course. It appears to me that low calcium causes excess intracellular vitamin D, not that extra
    dietary vitamin D is bad. In fact, vitamin D is necessary for calcium absorption. So, strangely, you
    need the vitamin D in order to absorb the calcium in order to decrease intracellular vitamin D.

    At least, that's my understanding. I hope someone will set me straight if I am wrong.

    [email protected] on 3/5/04 10:04 AM at [email protected] in [email protected] wrote:

    > Kev ([email protected]) wrote:
    >
    > : Does anyone agree with this?
    >
    > What about the fact that we women are told to take calcium supplements that have added vitamin D
    > for better absorption?
    >
    > margo
     
  6. Robert Klute

    Robert Klute Guest

    From the B.U. Bridge (Boston University)

    Got milk? Contrary to popular belief, what causes those milk moustaches in the dairy industry’s ad
    campaign may play a role in helping to prevent obesity in children and adolescents. “There’s a myth
    that consuming fat from dairy products makes you fat. Lots of people believe that. Lots of doctors
    believe that. It’s not completely true,” reported Lynn Moore, a MED associate professor, at a recent
    meeting of the North American Association for the Study of Obesity.

    Moore’s most recent study showed that those whose diet was low in dairy products when they were
    young children were more likely, not less likely, to develop excess weight and body fat as teenagers
    than their counterparts whose diet as children was rich in dairy products. Using data from the
    Framingham Children’s Study, whose participants are third and fourth generation descendants of the
    original Framingham Heart Study participants, Moore tracked 99 children, beginning at ages three to
    five, over a 12-year period. Using diet records collected several times a year for each participant,
    she divided the children into three groups: those with high, moderate, and low dairy consumption.
    She compiled and analyzed common measures of stored body fat (body mass index and skinfold
    measurements) for each group. The children who consumed the fewest servings of dairy products in the
    preschool years had 45 percent more subcutaneous fat as measured by the sum of four skinfolds than
    did children in the highest dairy intake group.

    Moore hypothesizes that several factors may contribute to this effect. Dairy foods are a rich source
    of calcium and magnesium. Insufficient calcium may trigger the body to store energy in the form of
    fat; similarly, magnesium deficiency has been shown to promote insulin resistance -- preventing the
    body from efficiently metabolizing nutrients. She suggests that other biologically active compounds
    in dairy foods may affect weight regulation and metabolism. Also, children who consume more dairy
    products may drink fewer sugary drinks and other high-calorie snacks.

    According to Moore, only 30 percent of children get the minimum recommended amount of dairy
    products. Because whole milk products can contribute to weight gain, she suggests that reduced-fat
    or skim milk would probably supply the benefits without the calories and the saturated fat.

    (Poster's note: The analysis was financed largely by the National Health, Lung and Blood Institute
    with additional funding from the National Dairy Council).

    Here is the BU paper:

    http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/entrez/query.fcgi?cmd=Retrieve&db=PubMed&list_uids=11093294&dop-
    t=Abstract
     
  7. [email protected] [email protected] [email protected] Once upon a time, our fellow [email protected]
    () rambled on about "Re: Vitamin D creates more fat???." Our champion De-Medicalizing in
    sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

    >What about the fact that we women are told to take calcium supplements that have added vitamin D
    >for better absorption?

    What about it?

    Ha, ... Hah, Ha!
     
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