Vitamins from food

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Karstens Rage, Nov 4, 2003.

  1. In Chapter 10 of Smart Eating by Covert Bailey he makes the argument that you should get your
    vitamins from food. He seems to say that by getting your vitamins from food you become more capable
    of processing the food to get the vitamins. Whereas if you take a vitamin supplement your natural
    ability to get vitamins from food "atrophies."

    Now assuming a relatively good diet of whole grains, veggies and fruit, fish (often), poultry (less
    often) and red meat (rarely) is it reasonable to expect that you can get most of your necessary
    vitamins and minerals or is it really much more difficult than "casual" eating?

    By "casual" I mean not paying attention to getting "this much" folate, and "that much" lycopene but
    rather just eating spinach or tomatos when the mood hits.

    k
     
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  2. Nicholas

    Nicholas Guest

    "Karstens Rage" <[email protected]> ha scritto nel messaggio
    news:54%[email protected]_s04...
    > In Chapter 10 of Smart Eating by Covert Bailey he makes the argument that you should get your
    > vitamins from food. He seems to say that by getting your vitamins from food you become more
    > capable of processing the food to get the vitamins. Whereas if you take a vitamin supplement your
    > natural ability to get vitamins from food "atrophies."
    >
    > Now assuming a relatively good diet of whole grains, veggies and fruit, fish (often), poultry
    > (less often) and red meat (rarely) is it reasonable to expect that you can get most of your
    > necessary vitamins and minerals or is it really much more difficult than "casual" eating?
    >
    > By "casual" I mean not paying attention to getting "this much" folate, and "that much" lycopene
    > but rather just eating spinach or tomatos when the mood hits.

    Pritikin diet: fruits, vegetables, greens, nuts, starches, whole grains, legumes and rarely poultry
    that has always showed positive results in more than 70 studies, has been reported to provide high
    and even 100% of RDA for all vitamins and minerals except vitamin E

    Niky
     
  3. Once upon a time, our fellow Karstens Rage rambled on about "Vitamins from food." Our champion
    De-Medicalizing in sci.med.nutrition retorts, thusly ...

    >Now assuming a relatively good diet of whole grains, veggies and fruit, fish (often), poultry (less
    >often) and red meat (rarely) is it reasonable to expect that you can get most of your necessary
    >vitamins and minerals or is it really much more difficult than "casual" eating?

    Excuse me, but a relatively good diet of whole grains, veggies and fruit, fish (often), poultry
    (less often) and red meat (rarely) and "casual" eating is an oxymoron.

    Next, after putting a lot of effort in eating a well balanced and varied diet, nutrient intake is
    a function of caloric intake. Women need to be consuming at least 2,000 calories and men 2,700
    calories a day before nutrient intake from your diet can be reasonably expected to be adequate
    from a diet.

    >By "casual" I mean not paying attention to getting "this much" folate, and "that much" lycopene but
    >rather just eating spinach or tomatos when the mood hits.

    Only an idiot would think this.

    You have to pay attention to what you eat. It is called balance and variety.
    --
    John Gohde, Achieving good Nutrition is an Art, NOT a Science!

    The nutrition of eating a healthy diet is the foundation of the biopsychosocial model of natural
    health. Weighing in at 17 webpages, Nutrition (http://www.Food.NaturalHealthPerspective.com/) is now
    the unofficial FAQ for sci.med.nutrition by default. :)
     
  4. "Karstens Rage" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:54%[email protected]_s04...
    > In Chapter 10 of Smart Eating by Covert Bailey he makes the argument that you should get your
    > vitamins from food. He seems to say that by getting your vitamins from food you become more
    > capable of processing the food to get the vitamins.

    That is pure BS, IMHO.

    > Whereas if you take a vitamin supplement your natural ability to get vitamins from food
    > "atrophies."

    Wrong. The ability to digest and absorb nutrients is reduced with aging and disease.
    >
    > Now assuming a relatively good diet of whole grains, veggies and fruit, fish (often), poultry
    > (less often) and red meat (rarely) is it reasonable to expect that you can get most of your
    > necessary vitamins and minerals or is it really much more difficult than "casual" eating?

    It will depend on your goals. It will depend on your criteria for success. I'll suggest posting this
    question to the sci.life-extension forum.

    >
    > By "casual" I mean not paying attention to getting "this much" folate, and "that much" lycopene
    > but rather just eating spinach or tomatos when the mood hits.

    For some it clearly requires more care to lower their homocysteine levels or reduced their chances
    of bearing a neonate with cleft lip or a neural tube defect. It depends on genetics, environment,
    and current dietary habits.

    Some try to practice use of tomato products on a daily basis so that it will be done as a habit
    and hence with less effort. I try to eat at least a serving of cooked greens each day plus a dark
    green salad.

    To have healthy habits, it is of value to deal with specifics went setting up new healthier habits.
    It takes awhile to develop some new better habits......likely several weeks.

    If one knows the foods high in nutrients, goal eating isn't hard. Granted some are too dull to be
    able to take that approach.
     
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