VO2 Max

Discussion in 'Cycling Training' started by [email protected], Jul 28, 2003.

  1. okierick@azalea

    [email protected] New Member

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    I am currently using a recumbent bike for exercise. Does anyone know a way to compute my VO2 Max from my time/distance/HR?
     
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  2. oneradtec

    oneradtec New Member

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    I once read in an issue of cyclesport how to do this on a hill using a very complicated formula. The column was written by Johnathan Vaughters. Maybe some of our subscribers can remember the exact issue and post the article here. I'll go through my back issues and see if I still have it.



     
  3. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    You can't calculate your VO2 max from this data in any way. If you want to know your VO2 max, then you'll need to pop down to your local exercise physiology/sport science lab and get tested.

    Ric
     
  4. ric_stern/RST

    ric_stern/RST New Member

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    It's possible to calculate your power output when riding uphill, using one of several formulas. Your best option is to go to www.analyticcycling.com and use the calculators there.

    If you want to calculate a ball park figure:

    Power = mass (kg) x gravity (9.81) x vertical height climbed (metres) / time (secs)

    That's the power needed to overcome gravity

    you then need to add ~ 30 - 50 W for the other retarding forces (e.g., air drag, bearing resistance, rolling resistance, etc).

    Then to get a rough idea on VO2 (not VO2 max, which by definition requires a maximal aerobic effort), you can divide the power output obtained in steps 1 to 2 by 75. As a rough idea economy in most cyclists is ~ 75 W/L.

    Thus, if you were riding a hill at ~ 300 W, then your VO2 would be ~ 4 L/min. This really only applies to sustained steady state efforts, and is only a rough ball park figure.

    Ric
     
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