VO2 max

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Jane, May 23, 2004.

  1. Jane

    Jane Guest

    I have never paid too much attention to the technical
    aspects of training so forgive my ignorance on vo2. I had a
    stress test last summer and just realized that the results
    that I got included my vo2 measurement. I wonder if there is
    a calculator that would predict what race times I should be
    able to achieve based on vo2. Also, at the time, I had just
    started training for a half marathon so my distance was
    increasing. Will vo2 change much with training?
     
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  2. Lyndon

    Lyndon Guest

    Jane wrote:

    >I have never paid too much attention to the technical
    >aspects of training so forgive my ignorance on vo2. I had a
    >stress test last summer and just realized that the results
    >that I got included my vo2 measurement. I wonder if there
    >is a calculator that would predict what race times I should
    >be able to achieve based on vo2. Also, at the time, I had
    >just started training for a half marathon so my distance
    >was increasing. Will vo2 change much with training?
    >

    You can try this calculator, which calculates based on a
    race time, but also gives a VO2max estimate and predicted
    times for a large number of distances. So you can adjust
    race times until you get the desired VO2max, then look up
    all the equivalent race times. The purdy column is the most
    accurate for distance events.

    http://run-down.com/statistics/calc.php

    I also have a calculator for Jack Daniels' Oxygen Power
    equations that can calculate any distance from any other
    distance and also gives VO2max estimates. As this is an
    Excel spreadsheet, I can't post this, but send me an email
    if you want it.

    Lyndon

    Lyndon "Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!"
    --US Olympic Track Coach Brooks Johnson
     
  3. Dan Stumpus

    Dan Stumpus Guest

    Hi Lyndon:

    I only wish VO2 max predictions were true...I measured 76.4
    vo2 max at USC back in 81, which predicts a 28:40 10k and a
    2:13 marathon.

    I also held the record for a while as the person able to
    stay longest on the vo2max treadmill (20 minutes with the 3
    minute protocol with increasing grade & speed)

    Unfortunately, my bests were only 33:35 10k and 2:37
    marathon, although I retired from serious racing after only
    3 years -- maybe I could have gotten faster if I'd been
    more patient.

    I was trounced by a friend who got only 62, but could run
    32:30. He had a *very* smooth stride. I bounce quite a bit.
    Apparently, I have a good motor, but "square wheels".

    By the bye, since you are regional or national class in your
    specialty, and a coach to boot, do elite competitors in the
    100/200/400/800 world have high vo2 maxes?

    --Dan
     
  4. Jane

    Jane Guest

    Lyndon, Thanks for the link. I think this tells me all I
    need to know. My vo2 max

    for the general population but clearly not very good
    compared to other runners. It seems my best half marathon
    would only be 1:52:05!!

    Any chance I can improve on that? Jane

    "Lyndon" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    m03.aol.com...
    > Jane wrote:
    >
    > >I have never paid too much attention to the technical
    > >aspects of training
    so
    > >forgive my ignorance on vo2. I had a stress test last
    > >summer and just realized that the results that I got
    > >included my vo2 measurement. I
    wonder
    > >if there is a calculator that would predict what race
    > >times I should be
    able
    > >to achieve based on vo2. Also, at the time, I had just
    > >started training
    for
    > >a half marathon so my distance was increasing. Will vo2
    > >change much with training?
    > >
    >
    > You can try this calculator, which calculates based on a
    > race time, but
    also
    > gives a VO2max estimate and predicted times for a large
    > number of
    distances.
    > So you can adjust race times until you get the desired
    > VO2max, then look
    up all
    > the equivalent race times. The purdy column is the most
    > accurate for
    distance
    > events.
    >
    > http://run-down.com/statistics/calc.php
    >
    > I also have a calculator for Jack Daniels' Oxygen Power
    > equations that can calculate any distance from any other
    > distance and also gives VO2max
    estimates.
    > As this is an Excel spreadsheet, I can't post this, but
    > send me an email
    if
    > you want it.
    >
    > Lyndon
    >
    > Lyndon "Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!"
    > --US Olympic Track
    Coach
    > Brooks Johnson
     
  5. Preter

    Preter Guest

    How big are they Jane?

    "Jane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Lyndon, Thanks for the link. I think this tells me all I
    > need to know. My vo2 max

    > for the general population but clearly not very good
    > compared to other runners. It seems my best half marathon
    > would only be 1:52:05!!
    >
    > Any chance I can improve on that? Jane
    >
    > "Lyndon" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    > m03.aol.com...
    > > Jane wrote:
    > >
    > > >I have never paid too much attention to the technical
    > > >aspects of training
    > so
    > > >forgive my ignorance on vo2. I had a stress test last
    > > >summer and just realized that the results that I got
    > > >included my vo2 measurement. I
    > wonder
    > > >if there is a calculator that would predict what race
    > > >times I should be
    > able
    > > >to achieve based on vo2. Also, at the time, I had just
    > > >started training
    > for
    > > >a half marathon so my distance was increasing. Will vo2
    > > >change much with training?
    > > >
    > >
    > > You can try this calculator, which calculates based on a
    > > race time, but
    > also
    > > gives a VO2max estimate and predicted times for a large
    > > number of
    > distances.
    > > So you can adjust race times until you get the desired
    > > VO2max, then look
    > up all
    > > the equivalent race times. The purdy column is the most
    > > accurate for
    > distance
    > > events.
    > >
    > > http://run-down.com/statistics/calc.php
    > >
    > > I also have a calculator for Jack Daniels' Oxygen Power
    > > equations that can calculate any distance from any other
    > > distance and also gives VO2max
    > estimates.
    > > As this is an Excel spreadsheet, I can't post this, but
    > > send me an email
    > if
    > > you want it.
    > >
    > > Lyndon
    > >
    > > Lyndon "Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have
    > > it!" --US Olympic Track
    > Coach
    > > Brooks Johnson
     
  6. Sam

    Sam Guest

    First, unless they had you breathing into a mask or a tube,
    the numbers they gave you from the GXT were estimates only.
    The formula can be a bit off if you are active (the original
    population for many of these estimates were not fit people).

    Second, if they did use a metabolic cart, many are notorious
    for being poorly calibrated. The technicians often do not
    calibrate them properly or after every test as should be
    done. I am skeptical of most VO2max readings unless I
    personally know about the place doing them!

    VO2max can be improved with training, but for a fit person
    it will not rise by much. The most a fit active person can
    expect to raise VO2max is 20% and that would be at the high
    end. Data (unpublished) out of the Australian Institute of
    Sport saw a 7% change in Vo2max amongst its pro cyclists
    from start of the training year to Worlds.

    VO2max is but one aspect of being a better athlete. In
    running your pace at VO2max (vVO2max) is a better predictor
    of performance. Pace at Lactate Threshold is probably an
    even better predictor (I say probably only because I am not
    aware of any studies that have compared the two). Running
    economy is another factor. That is how much oxygen one uses
    to run at a submaximal pace.

    There are charts, but I would call them useless. In
    your case (I am assuming) you did not get a real
    VO2max measurement to begin with so you would be
    putting in garbage.

    "Jane" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have never paid too much attention to the technical
    > aspects of training
    so
    > forgive my ignorance on vo2. I had a stress test last
    > summer and just realized that the results that I got
    > included my vo2 measurement. I
    wonder
    > if there is a calculator that would predict what race
    > times I should be
    able
    > to achieve based on vo2. Also, at the time, I had just
    > started training
    for
    > a half marathon so my distance was increasing. Will vo2
    > change much with training?
     
  7. Sam

    Sam Guest

    As I will note many times, I distrust most if not all VO2max
    measurements.

    To answer your question about VO2max, good (national class)
    800m runners will have a very high VO2max. The sprinters
    less so. Part of the determination of VO2max is muscle fiber
    type and the sprinters tend to have more fast twitch.

    "Dan Stumpus" <[email protected]> wrote in message ne-
    ws:[email protected]
    > Hi Lyndon:
    >
    > I only wish VO2 max predictions were true...I measured
    > 76.4 vo2 max at USC back in 81, which predicts a 28:40 10k
    > and a 2:13 marathon.
    >
    > I also held the record for a while as the person able to
    > stay longest on
    the
    > vo2max treadmill (20 minutes with the 3 minute protocol
    > with increasing grade & speed)
    >
    > Unfortunately, my bests were only 33:35 10k and 2:37
    > marathon, although I retired from serious racing after
    > only 3 years -- maybe I could have
    gotten
    > faster if I'd been more patient.
    >
    > I was trounced by a friend who got only 62, but could run
    > 32:30. He had a *very* smooth stride. I bounce quite a
    > bit. Apparently, I have a good motor, but "square wheels".
    >
    > By the bye, since you are regional or national class in
    > your specialty,
    and
    > a coach to boot, do elite competitors in the
    > 100/200/400/800 world have
    high
    > vo2 maxes?
    >
    > --Dan
     
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