Vommitting whilst cycling

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by CloseSupport, Jul 21, 2004.

  1. CloseSupport

    CloseSupport Guest

    I have a slight dilema, i can sprint for about 2-3miles but i find once I
    start to slow down i begin to feel nauseous then have to vommit, once i get
    back upto speed i'm okey again. does anyone or has anyone encountered
    anything like this.

    I'm quite concerned since i sprint to work vommit once or twice on the way
    and gag like mad when i climb off my bike.

    It is really begining to put me off cycling at the momment could it be down
    to overheating, but if so how come when i'm at speed i don't feel like
    vommitting.

    Thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. LaoFuZhi

    LaoFuZhi Guest


    > It is really begining to put me off cycling at the momment could it be

    down
    > to overheating, but if so how come when i'm at speed i don't feel like
    > vommitting.


    Because you're being air-cooled?

    I think you need to speak to your doctor about this one...... Are you
    monitoring your heart rate?
     
  3. > I have a slight dilema, i can sprint for about 2-3miles but i find
    > once I start to slow down i begin to feel nauseous then have to
    > vommit, once i get back upto speed i'm okey again. does anyone or has
    > anyone encountered anything like this.


    The nearest thing to that that I've heard is the way roadies blow their
    nose on the move. Not sure which is worse tho. S'pose it depends whether
    you're in a pack or not.

    If you think it's due to over heating then wear less. Also, when you do
    puke, swallow the stuff back down - it won't taste as nice as when it first
    went in but I'm sure your body will soon learn to stop doing it. It's also
    a useful trick at parties. The hard part is not snorting the stuff out
    your nose.

    Hope that helps.
     
  4. "CloseSupport" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I have a slight dilema, i can sprint for about 2-3miles but i find once I
    > start to slow down i begin to feel nauseous then have to vommit, once i

    get
    > back upto speed i'm okey again. does anyone or has anyone encountered
    > anything like this.
    >
    > I'm quite concerned since i sprint to work vommit once or twice on the way
    > and gag like mad when i climb off my bike.
    >
    > It is really begining to put me off cycling at the momment could it be

    down
    > to overheating, but if so how come when i'm at speed i don't feel like
    > vommitting.
    >
    > Thanks


    2-3 miles is too far to sprint!

    Ken Clements
     
  5. MSeries

    MSeries New Member

    Joined:
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    Seems obvious to me. If you don't want these sensations, set out a little earlier and don't ride so hard.
     
  6. Paul - xxx

    Paul - xxx Guest

    CloseSupport typed:
    > I have a slight dilema, i can sprint for about 2-3miles


    Jeez ... I could sprint for maybe 1 k when I was fit ...

    > but i find once I
    > start to slow down i begin to feel nauseous then have to vommit, once i
    > get back upto speed i'm okey again. does anyone or has anyone encountered
    > anything like this.


    Yup, it's your body telling you you're working too hard and for too long.

    Drink more water


    --
    Paul ...

    (8(|) ... Homer Rocks
     
  7. In news:[email protected],
    Mark Thompson <[email protected]> expounded sagaciously:
    Also, when you
    > do puke, swallow the stuff back down -




    what?? Why?? That's supposed to make you feel better?
    I retch if I see someone else puking, I certainly ain't going to start
    dining on trhe stuff.

    --


    Martin Bulmer

    Pie Conservation Threat
     
  8. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Martin Bulmer" <[email protected]> wrote in news:cdnqsd$u4u$2
    @newsg1.svr.pol.co.uk:

    > I retch if I see someone else puking, I certainly ain't going to start
    > dining on trhe stuff.


    Hey, it's a free hot meal!







    Graeme
     
  9. m-gineering

    m-gineering Guest

    CloseSupport wrote:
    > I have a slight dilema, i can sprint for about 2-3miles but i find once I
    > start to slow down i begin to feel nauseous then have to vommit, once i get
    > back upto speed i'm okey again. does anyone or has anyone encountered
    > anything like this.
    >
    > I'm quite concerned since i sprint to work vommit once or twice on the way
    > and gag like mad when i climb off my bike.
    >
    > It is really begining to put me off cycling at the momment could it be down
    > to overheating, but if so how come when i'm at speed i don't feel like
    > vommitting.
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    >
    >
    >

    vommiting is often linked to spicey food or too strong energy drinks
    (never believe the manufacturer!) A different brand might help.
    /Marten
     
  10. Nick Drew

    Nick Drew Guest

    > I have a slight dilema, i can sprint for about 2-3miles but i find once I
    > start to slow down i begin to feel nauseous then have to vommit, once i

    get
    > back upto speed i'm okey again. does anyone or has anyone encountered
    > anything like this.
    >
    > I'm quite concerned since i sprint to work vommit once or twice on the way
    > and gag like mad when i climb off my bike.
    >
    > It is really begining to put me off cycling at the momment could it be

    down
    > to overheating, but if so how come when i'm at speed i don't feel like
    > vommitting.


    Um, I can see why it might put you off....

    The easy answer is to back off a bit when sprinting - don't push yourself so
    hard. The other thing is that when you do stop sprinting, gradually slow
    down, rather than just stopping and hopping off the bike - I presume you
    stop when you get to work? you might find it easier to go round the block,
    just to work some of the lactic acid out.

    OK, I don't know the scientific explanation, but I find when sprinting on a
    bike, or pushing myself too hard when running, if I suddenly stop I feel
    very nauseous. When I was younger it used to make me puke. I discovered
    slowing down fairly gradually felt better than stopping suddenly.

    Hope this helps.
    Nick
     
  11. LaoFuZhi

    LaoFuZhi Guest


    > > do puke, swallow the stuff back down -


    I wouldn't! Stomach contents will probably be acidic..... The osophaegus
    (spelling?) isn't designed to be exposed to stomach acid and swallowing it
    back down will prolong the exposure... Possible leading to long term
    damage....
     
  12. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "LaoFuZhi" <the.real.address [email protected]
    thing.not.too.hard.to.work.out> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I wouldn't! Stomach contents will probably be acidic..... The
    > osophaegus (spelling?) isn't designed to be exposed to stomach acid
    > and swallowing it back down will prolong the exposure... Possible
    > leading to long term damage....


    It should be able to handle it for rare occasions. For a couple of years I
    had big problems with acid reflux (turned out to be caused by stress and a
    candida infection) to the extent that I often had to sit up at night to
    sleep as lying down made it worse. I went for that lovely test called a
    "barium meal" where you swallow a noxious heavy liquid and then X-ray you.
    The radiologist was very impressed as he said he'd never in his life seen
    the liquid reflux back up as high as I managed. Apparently it reached about
    halfway up my neck. So this was what was happening with my nicely acidic
    stomach contents. I've been told that I have no long term damage, no doubt
    there may be some small amount, but I would imagine that would disappear
    over time.

    Still, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone...

    Graeme
     
  13. Eric Nolan

    Eric Nolan Guest

    Sounds like lactic acid build up to me. Do some research on that and
    see what you can find out.

    From memory once your body is operating above a certain level lactic
    acid is no longer being removed from your blood stream. Do that for
    long enough and you will experience severe detrimental effects,
    including vomitting. When your HR drops below your threshold again
    the lactic acid starts to be removed.

    I think you can probably work out the HR at which you stop eliminating
    lactic acid and how long you can safely stay above this. The solution
    would then be to either keep your HR below this or alternatively
    sprint for a certain amount of time, then ease back for a while before
    sprinting again. just because your legs and lungs allow you to sprint
    for longer than that time doesn't mean your blood chemistry is fine
    with it. :)

    IIRC Lance Armstrong has some freakishly unnatural tolerance for
    lactic acid which is part of the reason he is such a phenomenol racer.
     
  14. LaoFuZhi

    LaoFuZhi Guest

    "Graeme" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > "LaoFuZhi" <the.real.address [email protected]
    > thing.not.too.hard.to.work.out> wrote in
    > news:[email protected]:
    >
    > > I wouldn't! Stomach contents will probably be acidic..... The
    > > osophaegus (spelling?) isn't designed to be exposed to stomach acid
    > > and swallowing it back down will prolong the exposure... Possible
    > > leading to long term damage....

    >
    > It should be able to handle it for rare occasions. For a couple of years I
    > had big problems with acid reflux (turned out to be caused by stress and a
    > candida infection) to the extent that I often had to sit up at night to
    > sleep as lying down made it worse. I went for that lovely test called a
    > "barium meal" where you swallow a noxious heavy liquid and then X-ray you.
    > The radiologist was very impressed as he said he'd never in his life seen
    > the liquid reflux back up as high as I managed. Apparently it reached

    about
    > halfway up my neck. So this was what was happening with my nicely acidic
    > stomach contents. I've been told that I have no long term damage, no doubt
    > there may be some small amount, but I would imagine that would disappear
    > over time.
    >
    > Still, I wouldn't recommend it to anyone...
    >
    > Graeme


    Been down that road myself many years ago...... There was I expecting
    nuclear fission chips and all I got was this grotty milkshake.... They must
    do 'em better up here since mine tased fine; like strawberry.....

    I believe that acid reflux can do some damage to the osophaegus, though as
    you suggest it may well be minor and to some extent 'heal-able'. Bizzarely
    my stomach problems, which included to an ulcer were put to rest by my then
    girlfirend's mum who insisted of feeding me her special curry! Some sort of
    traditional Cantonese cure for a 'hot' stomach or something..... Dunno how
    it worked but it did!
     
  15. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "LaoFuZhi" <the.real.address [email protected]
    thing.not.too.hard.to.work.out> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Been down that road myself many years ago...... There was I expecting
    > nuclear fission chips and all I got was this grotty milkshake....
    > They must do 'em better up here since mine tased fine; like
    > strawberry.....


    I had mine at the Western General in Edinburgh around '97, so probably
    not far from where you had yours, if not the same place (I seem to
    remember you said you're from Kirknewton). The one I had was flavoured
    with something, but I don't remember what. I normally find artificial
    flavours fairly unpleasant. The sherbert followed by fizzy drink to
    expand the stomach was the best bit.

    The, ahem, "after effects" did just sit there for some time, despite many
    flushes. :-/

    > Bizzarely my stomach problems, which included to an
    > ulcer were put to rest by my then girlfirend's mum who insisted of
    > feeding me her special curry! Some sort of traditional Cantonese cure
    > for a 'hot' stomach or something..... Dunno how it worked but it did!


    Lucky bugger, getting that stuff for free! There's a really great Chinese
    herbal restaurant in Edinburgh at the Ocean Terminal, "Palace Chine" if I
    remember correctly. We try to go there whenever we're back home, mind
    you, we also try to go to our favourite chippy in Alnwick so don't
    attribute any sort of gastronomical sophistication to me :)

    Graeme
     
  16. Fat Lad

    Fat Lad New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 11, 2004
    Messages:
    34
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    0
    I could do this instead of eating cold toast on the train for breakfast! :cool:
     
  17. Jon Senior

    Jon Senior Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > Sounds like lactic acid build up to me. Do some research on that and
    > see what you can find out.
    >
    > From memory once your body is operating above a certain level lactic
    > acid is no longer being removed from your blood stream. Do that for
    > long enough and you will experience severe detrimental effects,
    > including vomitting. When your HR drops below your threshold again
    > the lactic acid starts to be removed.
    >
    > I think you can probably work out the HR at which you stop eliminating
    > lactic acid and how long you can safely stay above this. The solution
    > would then be to either keep your HR below this or alternatively
    > sprint for a certain amount of time, then ease back for a while before
    > sprinting again. just because your legs and lungs allow you to sprint
    > for longer than that time doesn't mean your blood chemistry is fine
    > with it. :)
    >
    > IIRC Lance Armstrong has some freakishly unnatural tolerance for
    > lactic acid which is part of the reason he is such a phenomenol racer.


    To get lactate levels up to a point at which they cause sever
    physiological effects is quite impressive. I give up due to muscle pain
    long before anything major happens.

    To the OP: Does it hurt your legs much before this point? If not (Or
    even if so) I'd seriously consider seeing a doctor.

    Jon
     
  18. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Eric Nolan wrote:

    > Sounds like lactic acid build up to me. Do some research on that and
    > see what you can find out.


    Sounds like exercise-induced nausea to me:) About which google has a
    lot to say. I sometimes feel a bit dizzy and unwell when stopping
    abruptly at the top of a hill - my old workplace was situated in such a
    location so it was not easily avoided.

    James
    --
    If I have seen further than others, it is
    by treading on the toes of giants.
    http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
     
  19. Graeme ([email protected]removethis.com) wrote:
    : I had mine at the Western General in Edinburgh around '97, so probably
    : not far from where you had yours, if not the same place (I seem to
    : remember you said you're from Kirknewton). The one I had was flavoured
    : with something, but I don't remember what. I normally find artificial
    : flavours fairly unpleasant. The sherbert followed by fizzy drink to
    : expand the stomach was the best bit.
    : The, ahem, "after effects" did just sit there for some time, despite many
    : flushes. :-/

    I've had a barium meal and a barium enema. The 'milk shake' is by far the
    more pleasant of the two!

    Blair.
     
  20. LaoFuZhi

    LaoFuZhi Guest


    > I had mine at the Western General in Edinburgh around '97, so probably
    > not far from where you had yours, if not the same place (I seem to
    > remember you said you're from Kirknewton).


    I am indeed resident in Kirknewton but hail originally from Springburn.....

    Mine was done in about 1980 at the Royal; I was only about 18 at the
    time.... Maybe the full horror's softened after all this time...

    > The, ahem, "after effects" did just sit there for some time, despite many
    > flushes. :-/


    Hmmmm, yess, I'd forgotten about that bit :-\

    > Lucky bugger, getting that stuff for free! There's a really great Chinese
    > herbal restaurant in Edinburgh at the Ocean Terminal, "Palace Chine" if I
    > remember correctly.


    Been there once or twice; it's not bad at all...... Maw Chan's special
    curry is summat else though! :)

    > you, we also try to go to our favourite chippy in Alnwick so don't
    > attribute any sort of gastronomical sophistication to me :)


    Now't wrong wi' Alnwick or good ol' fish an' chips! I lived in that part of
    the world too for a wee while; near Wooler..... I do like a nice white
    puddin supper! Something you don't seem to find in the West of
    Scotland......
     
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