Vote for Peace: Ride a Bicycle!!!

Discussion in 'rec.bicycles.soc archive' started by Don Quijote, Mar 21, 2003.

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  1. Don Quijote

    Don Quijote Guest

    VOTE FOR PEACE: RIDE A BICYCLE!!!

    Well, since this war seems to be about oil, why not boycott it? The way to go is to 'burn the
    calories' in a nice, clean and safe way...

    (the emphasis in capital letters and quotes is mine)

    Source: "Green Urbanism: Learning from European Cities," by Timothy Beatley.

    Bicycles as a legitimate form of mobility.

    There are few mobility options more environmentally-friendly than bicycles. They are zero emissions,
    take up relatively little space, are inexpensive, are available to the young and old alike, and
    provide their users with important physical exercise. In the United States and many other developed
    countries, we have ignored or "forgotten" this relatively low-tech mobility option. Yet, in many
    northern European cities, bicycles are a significant and legitimate mobility option and an
    increasingly important part of the transportation mix there.

    Bicycle use as a percentage of the modal split is consistently much higher in most of the cities
    examined in this study and vigorously promoted as a more environmentally friendly mode, which
    provides greater mobility than the automobile (specially for shorter distances). Most of the cities
    studied here have developed, and continue to develop, extensive and impressive bicycle networks.
    Berlin has 800 kilometers of bike lanes and Frieburg has 410 kilometers. Vienna has more than
    doubled its bicycle network since the late 1980s and now has more than 500 kilometers. Copenhagen
    has about 300 kilometers of bike lanes and now has a policy of INSTALLING BIKE LANES ALONG ALL
    MAJOR STREETS. Bicycle use there has gone up 65 per cent since 1970. These cities show commitment
    to making bicycle use easy and safe, and they reveal the key ingredients to building
    bicycle-friendly cities.

    Bicycle use in these exemplary cities is year-round proposition. Summer use of bicycles is usually
    higher in northern cities such as Copenhagen, where 40 per cent of work-commutes are by bicycle
    during these months. Nevertheless, in Copenhagen some 70 per cent of those normally bicycling also
    bicycle to work during the winter months. Similar experience can be found in Finnish cities,
    suggesting that the notion that bicycling is feasible or acceptable only in ideal weather is untrue.
    That such high rates of usage can be achieved in northern European cities suggests GREAT PROMISE FOR
    AMERICAN CITIES. And, while bicycles are specially promising for shorter trips, it is clear that
    many people are prepared to ride their bicycles considerable distances. It has been estimated that
    in Copenhagen, an average bicycle commute is 7 kilometer, or about 20 minutes --many commutes are
    longer, which indicates that many residential areas will, given facilities and safe routes, be
    within a reasonable bicycle commuting range.

    A ROAD TO FREEDOM (UNLIKE RUSSIA'S)

    Why not build a new system? That offers PROSPERITY, SOCIAL JUSTICE and FREEDOM; that discards the
    defects of both Communism and Capitalism; and that places the system at the service of the human
    being, and not the other way around. Why not HUMANISM?

    Naturally, education and health care should be the maximum priorities; they should be free -or
    affordable, in the case of higher education- and accessible to all. Education should emphasize the
    learning of English -or Esperanto, if we all ever on it- and literacy... in computers. Likewise,
    culture and sports should receive special attention (for example, adopting the affordable child-care
    centers; in general, we would have much to learn from the Scandinavian model). A MIXED MODEL, that
    includes competition and cooperation, would create a healthy competition, and it would allow to
    satisfy the material and human needs of all. (In this way, the cooperative enterprises would be
    forced to become more efficient, while capitalist enterprises would be forced to become more humane;
    we would have much to learn from the Israeli kibbutz [non-profit cooperatives]; and from the
    industrial cooperatives of Mondragon, in the Basque Country [a "workers capitalism"].) We should
    seek full employment (for instance, by creating jobs in the construction of the transportation
    infrastructure; but, if unemployment persists, the work time could be reduced). Public
    transportation should be A1. (The city of Curitiba, in Brazil, offers us a functional model of
    transportation; BICYCLE LANES SHOULD BE IMPLEMENTED ALONG ALL MAJOR STREETS.)

    (snip)

    http://webspawner.com/users/donquijote
     
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  2. Jack Kessler

    Jack Kessler Guest

    I have an even better idea, Don. Why not find out what you're talking about before carrying on so
    piously sweetly and ignorantly?

    For instance, your claim that European cities, particularly northern ones, all have bike lanes isn't
    even close to true. Norway, the richest country in Scandinavia, has crappy, limited, often poorly
    maintained, bike lanes along main roads when they pass through towns. They don't go along any other
    roads or streets. Between towns, not only are there no bike lanes, there aren't even shoulders.

    Your difficulty with knowing what you are talking about is reinforced when it comes to your
    ridiculous wonderfulness social ideology. Did you know that something very like what you are
    describing, a mixed economy with both socialist and capitalist elements, was tried and eventually
    abandoned in almost every country in Western Europe in the past century, including most notably the
    very Scandinavian countries you are waxing so frothy about.

    The reason the Social Democrats can't win elections in Europe any more is that everybody has been
    there and done that. They aren't interested in it any more because it didn't freakin' work when
    they tried it.

    Do you have any idea how much of a lamebrain you sound like in espousing a socialism that you think
    you are going to educate others about, like it's some kind of news to anyone?

    "Don Quijote" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > VOTE FOR PEACE: RIDE A BICYCLE!!!
    >
    > Well, since this war seems to be about oil, why not boycott it? The way to go is to 'burn the
    > calories' in a nice, clean and safe way...
    >
    > (the emphasis in capital letters and quotes is mine)
    >
    > Source: "Green Urbanism: Learning from European Cities," by Timothy Beatley.
    >
    > Bicycles as a legitimate form of mobility.
    >
    > There are few mobility options more environmentally-friendly than bicycles. They are zero
    > emissions, take up relatively little space, are inexpensive, are available to the young and old
    > alike, and provide their users with important physical exercise. In the United States and many
    > other developed countries, we have ignored or "forgotten" this relatively low-tech mobility
    > option. Yet, in many northern European cities, bicycles are a significant and legitimate mobility
    > option and an increasingly important part of the transportation mix there.
    >
    > Bicycle use as a percentage of the modal split is consistently much higher in most of the cities
    > examined in this study and vigorously promoted as a more environmentally friendly mode, which
    > provides greater mobility than the automobile (specially for shorter distances). Most of the
    > cities studied here have developed, and continue to develop, extensive and impressive bicycle
    > networks. Berlin has 800 kilometers of bike lanes and Frieburg has 410 kilometers. Vienna has more
    > than doubled its bicycle network since the late 1980s and now has more than 500 kilometers.
    > Copenhagen has about 300 kilometers of bike lanes and now has a policy of INSTALLING BIKE LANES
    > ALONG ALL MAJOR STREETS. Bicycle use there has gone up 65 per cent since 1970. These cities show
    > commitment to making bicycle use easy and safe, and they reveal the key ingredients to building
    > bicycle-friendly cities.
    >
    > Bicycle use in these exemplary cities is year-round proposition. Summer use of bicycles is usually
    > higher in northern cities such as Copenhagen, where 40 per cent of work-commutes are by bicycle
    > during these months. Nevertheless, in Copenhagen some 70 per cent of those normally bicycling also
    > bicycle to work during the winter months. Similar experience can be found in Finnish cities,
    > suggesting that the notion that bicycling is feasible or acceptable only in ideal weather is
    > untrue. That such high rates of usage can be achieved in northern European cities suggests GREAT
    > PROMISE FOR AMERICAN CITIES. And, while bicycles are specially promising for shorter trips, it is
    > clear that many people are prepared to ride their bicycles considerable distances. It has been
    > estimated that in Copenhagen, an average bicycle commute is 7 kilometer, or about 20 minutes
    > --many commutes are longer, which indicates that many residential areas will, given facilities and
    > safe routes, be within a reasonable bicycle commuting range.
    >
    > A ROAD TO FREEDOM (UNLIKE RUSSIA'S)
    >
    > Why not build a new system? That offers PROSPERITY, SOCIAL JUSTICE and FREEDOM; that discards the
    > defects of both Communism and Capitalism; and that places the system at the service of the human
    > being, and not the other way around. Why not HUMANISM?
    >
    > Naturally, education and health care should be the maximum priorities; they should be free -or
    > affordable, in the case of higher education- and accessible to all. Education should emphasize the
    > learning of English -or Esperanto, if we all ever on it- and literacy... in computers. Likewise,
    > culture and sports should receive special attention (for example, adopting the affordable
    > child-care centers; in general, we would have much to learn from the Scandinavian model). A MIXED
    > MODEL, that includes competition and cooperation, would create a healthy competition, and it would
    > allow to satisfy the material and human needs of all. (In this way, the cooperative enterprises
    > would be forced to become more efficient, while capitalist enterprises would be forced to become
    > more humane; we would have much to learn from the Israeli kibbutz [non-profit cooperatives]; and
    > from the industrial cooperatives of Mondragon, in the Basque Country [a "workers capitalism"].) We
    > should seek full employment (for instance, by creating jobs in the construction of the
    > transportation infrastructure; but, if unemployment persists, the work time could be reduced).
    > Public transportation should be A1. (The city of Curitiba, in Brazil, offers us a functional model
    > of transportation; BICYCLE LANES SHOULD BE IMPLEMENTED ALONG ALL MAJOR STREETS.)
    >
    > (snip)
    >
    > http://webspawner.com/users/donquijote
     
  3. David Storm

    David Storm Guest

    I haven't seen all of Europe's big cities, but have been in Prague, Paris, London, and Madrid. I was
    surprised at the small number of cyclists in these cities after being told about the prevalence of
    bicycles in Europe. It might be due to the fact that they have efficient mass transportation, and in
    Prague at least, people are very used to walking places within a mile or two. Frankly, cycling on
    the streets of those cities looked as though it would have been a harrowing experience. The only
    place I saw many cyclists were in the country...racer types and northern European tourists-bikers on
    Spanish coast getting away from the early spring cold.

    "Jack Kessler" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]ink.net...
    > I have an even better idea, Don. Why not find out what you're talking
    about
    > before carrying on so piously sweetly and ignorantly?
    >
    > For instance, your claim that European cities, particularly northern ones, all have bike lanes
    > isn't even close to true. Norway, the richest country in Scandinavia, has crappy, limited, often
    > poorly maintained, bike lanes along main roads when they pass through towns. They don't go along
    > any other roads or streets. Between towns, not only are there no bike lanes, there aren't even
    > shoulders.
    >
    > Your difficulty with knowing what you are talking about is reinforced when it comes to your
    > ridiculous wonderfulness social ideology. Did you know that something very like what you are
    > describing, a mixed economy with
    both
    > socialist and capitalist elements, was tried and eventually abandoned in almost every country in
    > Western Europe in the past century, including most notably the very Scandinavian countries you are
    > waxing so frothy about.
    >
    > The reason the Social Democrats can't win elections in Europe any more is that everybody has been
    > there and done that. They aren't interested in
    it
    > any more because it didn't freakin' work when they tried it.
    >
    > Do you have any idea how much of a lamebrain you sound like in espousing a socialism that you
    > think you are going to educate others about, like it's some kind of news to anyone?
    >
    >
    >
    > "Don Quijote" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > VOTE FOR PEACE: RIDE A BICYCLE!!!
    > >
    > > Well, since this war seems to be about oil, why not boycott it? The way to go is to 'burn the
    > > calories' in a nice, clean and safe way...
    > >
    > > (the emphasis in capital letters and quotes is mine)
    > >
    > > Source: "Green Urbanism: Learning from European Cities," by Timothy Beatley.
    > >
    > > Bicycles as a legitimate form of mobility.
    > >
    > > There are few mobility options more environmentally-friendly than bicycles. They are zero
    > > emissions, take up relatively little space, are inexpensive, are available to the young and old
    > > alike, and provide their users with important physical exercise. In the United States and many
    > > other developed countries, we have ignored or "forgotten" this relatively low-tech mobility
    > > option. Yet, in many northern European cities, bicycles are a significant and legitimate
    > > mobility option and an increasingly important part of the transportation mix there.
    > >
    > > Bicycle use as a percentage of the modal split is consistently much higher in most of the cities
    > > examined in this study and vigorously promoted as a more environmentally friendly mode, which
    > > provides greater mobility than the automobile (specially for shorter distances). Most of the
    > > cities studied here have developed, and continue to develop, extensive and impressive bicycle
    > > networks. Berlin has 800 kilometers of bike lanes and Frieburg has 410 kilometers. Vienna has
    > > more than doubled its bicycle network since the late 1980s and now has more than 500 kilometers.
    > > Copenhagen has about 300 kilometers of bike lanes and now has a policy of INSTALLING BIKE LANES
    > > ALONG ALL MAJOR STREETS. Bicycle use there has gone up 65 per cent since 1970. These cities show
    > > commitment to making bicycle use easy and safe, and they reveal the key ingredients to building
    > > bicycle-friendly cities.
    > >
    > > Bicycle use in these exemplary cities is year-round proposition. Summer use of bicycles is
    > > usually higher in northern cities such as Copenhagen, where 40 per cent of work-commutes are by
    > > bicycle during these months. Nevertheless, in Copenhagen some 70 per cent of those normally
    > > bicycling also bicycle to work during the winter months. Similar experience can be found in
    > > Finnish cities, suggesting that the notion that bicycling is feasible or acceptable only in
    > > ideal weather is untrue. That such high rates of usage can be achieved in northern European
    > > cities suggests GREAT PROMISE FOR AMERICAN CITIES. And, while bicycles are specially promising
    > > for shorter trips, it is clear that many people are prepared to ride their bicycles considerable
    > > distances. It has been estimated that in Copenhagen, an average bicycle commute is 7 kilometer,
    > > or about 20 minutes --many commutes are longer, which indicates that many residential areas
    > > will, given facilities and safe routes, be within a reasonable bicycle commuting range.
    > >
    > > A ROAD TO FREEDOM (UNLIKE RUSSIA'S)
    > >
    > > Why not build a new system? That offers PROSPERITY, SOCIAL JUSTICE and FREEDOM; that discards
    > > the defects of both Communism and Capitalism; and that places the system at the service of the
    > > human being, and not the other way around. Why not HUMANISM?
    > >
    > > Naturally, education and health care should be the maximum priorities; they should be free -or
    > > affordable, in the case of higher education- and accessible to all. Education should emphasize
    > > the learning of English -or Esperanto, if we all ever on it- and literacy... in computers.
    > > Likewise, culture and sports should receive special attention (for example, adopting the
    > > affordable child-care centers; in general, we would have much to learn from the Scandinavian
    > > model). A MIXED MODEL, that includes competition and cooperation, would create a healthy
    > > competition, and it would allow to satisfy the material and human needs of all. (In this way,
    > > the cooperative enterprises would be forced to become more efficient, while capitalist
    > > enterprises would be forced to become more humane; we would have much to learn from the Israeli
    > > kibbutz [non-profit cooperatives]; and from the industrial cooperatives of Mondragon, in the
    > > Basque Country [a "workers capitalism"].) We should seek full employment (for instance, by
    > > creating jobs in the construction of the transportation infrastructure; but, if unemployment
    > > persists, the work time could be reduced). Public transportation should be A1. (The city of
    > > Curitiba, in Brazil, offers us a functional model of transportation; BICYCLE LANES SHOULD BE
    > > IMPLEMENTED ALONG ALL MAJOR STREETS.)
    > >
    > > (snip)
    > >

    > > http://webspawner.com/users/donquijote
     
  4. Tom Kunich

    Tom Kunich Guest

    "David Storm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I haven't seen all of Europe's big cities, but have been in Prague, Paris, London, and Madrid. I
    > was surprised at the small number of cyclists in these cities after being told about the
    > prevalence of bicycles in Europe. It might be due to the fact that they have efficient mass
    > transportation, and in Prague at least, people are very used to walking places within a mile or
    > two. Frankly, cycling on the streets of those cities looked as though it would have been a
    > harrowing experience. The only place I saw many cyclists were in the country...racer types and
    > northern European tourists-bikers on Spanish coast getting away from the early spring cold.

    I had the same impression in France. I was there for two weeks and I didn't see a single
    recreational cyclist and only TWO commuters outside of Paris. The commuters were farmers riding out
    into their fields.

    In Paris it was extremely rare to see a bike anywhere except the rental bike tour along the Seine.

    The first French recreational rider I saw was two days before the Tour de France. They had a "ride
    the same course" ride early in the morning before the last stage began and in the USA there would
    have been thousands of riders. In Paris there were barely hundreds and most of them were speaking in
    non-French languages.

    France is a big country and I was told that bicycling is still popular in Britainy. But what is
    telling is that I met up with a friend over in Paris and he told me a story: he was riding through a
    city in France after spending two months there. He saw a bicycle going the other way and the other
    rider saw him. They both stopped and stared at each other because it was the first time either had
    seen a bicycle on their respective tours in France.
     
  5. Robert Chung

    Robert Chung Guest

    "Tom Kunich" <[email protected]> wrote
    > In Paris it was extremely rare to see a bike anywhere except the rental bike tour along the Seine.

    This is so at odds with my own observations that I'm left wondering what parts of Paris you were
    in, and how you define "extremely rare." I don't think bicycle riding is at all rare, even in
    inclement weather.
     
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