Waaaaaa! I broke my bike :(

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Succorso, Feb 28, 2005.

  1. Succorso

    Succorso Guest

    Ok, it was all my fault - and I deserve everything I get.

    I did just over 8,000km on my Dawes Sonoran last year. But it wasn't
    until I started noticing the odd chain skip that I thought I probably
    ought to check the chain for wear. It should be noted here that all my
    cycling is on dusty back lanes in Breckland, Norfolk (PSF Country) where
    the soil is very sandy and abrasive.

    Of course, the chain was HUGELY worn - it measured 12.5" on the 12-link
    measurement test. So I fitted a new one, and (as expected) it skips ALL
    the time now because the cassette is equally knackered.

    Now have a new cassette on order, but you can bet the Chainwheel is
    probably knack'd too.

    I must take more care of my bikes :(

    --
    Chris
     
    Tags:


  2. cupra

    cupra Guest

    Succorso wrote:
    > Ok, it was all my fault - and I deserve everything I get.
    >
    > I did just over 8,000km on my Dawes Sonoran last year. But it wasn't
    > until I started noticing the odd chain skip that I thought I probably
    > ought to check the chain for wear. It should be noted here that all my
    > cycling is on dusty back lanes in Breckland, Norfolk (PSF Country)
    > where the soil is very sandy and abrasive.
    >
    > Of course, the chain was HUGELY worn - it measured 12.5" on the
    > 12-link measurement test. So I fitted a new one, and (as expected) it
    > skips ALL the time now because the cassette is equally knackered.
    >
    > Now have a new cassette on order, but you can bet the Chainwheel is
    > probably knack'd too.
    >
    > I must take more care of my bikes :(


    That's caught me out too - on a weekend ride in Snowdonia, chain broke (U/S)
    so fitted a spare.... and it was clunk, clunk, clink for the rest of the
    ride!
     
  3. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 28/2/05 2:21 pm, in article [email protected],
    "Succorso" <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Ok, it was all my fault - and I deserve everything I get.
    >
    > I did just over 8,000km on my Dawes Sonoran last year. But it wasn't
    > until I started noticing the odd chain skip that I thought I probably
    > ought to check the chain for wear. It should be noted here that all my
    > cycling is on dusty back lanes in Breckland, Norfolk (PSF Country) where
    > the soil is very sandy and abrasive.
    >
    > Of course, the chain was HUGELY worn - it measured 12.5" on the 12-link
    > measurement test. So I fitted a new one, and (as expected) it skips ALL
    > the time now because the cassette is equally knackered.
    >
    > Now have a new cassette on order, but you can bet the Chainwheel is
    > probably knack'd too.


    You might get away with the chainset, but obviously not with the cassette.
    In the mean time, try a different gear, or, for the really mean, take the
    cassette apart and turn all the sprockets round. The shifting won't be as
    good but the chain won't skip (except on the bottom one or two which cannot
    be turned round.)

    ...d

    --

    "Instead of wasting hundreds of millions of pounds on compulsory ID cards as
    the Tory Right demand, let that money provide thousands more police officers
    on the beat in our local communities" Tony Blair 1995

    "The liberty of the subject should be taken away, not by the act of a
    politician but by a court of law." Tony Blair 1994
     
  4. wafflycat

    wafflycat Guest

    "Succorso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Ok, it was all my fault - and I deserve everything I get.
    >
    > I did just over 8,000km on my Dawes Sonoran last year. But it wasn't until
    > I started noticing the odd chain skip that I thought I probably ought to
    > check the chain for wear. It should be noted here that all my cycling is
    > on dusty back lanes in Breckland, Norfolk (PSF Country) where the soil is
    > very sandy and abrasive.
    >


    This is why I have a personal bike mechanic, known as Vernon. He looks after
    the Unfit Family steeds very well indeed. In his rides to college & back,
    even a week can thoroughly knacker the chain on Nathan's Nigel Dean. Vernon
    has to check it and clean it weekly, and in the winter more often to keep
    all in good working order.And the amount of salt on the roads is
    astonishing - it's Corrosionville out there.



    > Of course, the chain was HUGELY worn - it measured 12.5" on the 12-link
    > measurement test. So I fitted a new one, and (as expected) it skips ALL
    > the time now because the cassette is equally knackered.
    >
    > Now have a new cassette on order, but you can bet the Chainwheel is
    > probably knack'd too.
    >
    > I must take more care of my bikes :(


    Commisserations. I fyou need any tools - Vernon has loads - so get in touch
    if you need anything.

    Cheers, helen s


    >
    > --
    > Chris
     
  5. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    >
    > I fyou need any tools - Vernon has loads - so get in
    > touch if you need anything.
    >


    I feel a divorce in the air. There is no transgression more heinous
    than offering to lend someone else's tools, especially bicycle tools.

    Tony ;-)
     
  6. Jack Ouzzi

    Jack Ouzzi Guest

    >I feel a divorce in the air

    Ohhhh I will marry Helen, then I can get all my bikes serviced, AND
    have lots of lovely tools, bliss ;-)
     
  7. Jack Ouzzi wrote:

    >>I feel a divorce in the air

    >
    > Ohhhh I will marry Helen, then I can get all my bikes serviced, AND
    > have lots of lovely tools, bliss ;-)


    You misunderstand. If a divorce occurs, Vernon will probably not be
    interested in servicing the family bikes any more...

    --
    Mark.
    http://tranchant.plus.com/
     
  8. David Martin

    David Martin Guest

    On 28/2/05 4:11 pm, in article [email protected], "wafflycat"
    <wafflesATv21netDOTcoDOTuk> wrote:

    >
    > "Succorso" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]
    >> Ok, it was all my fault - and I deserve everything I get.
    >>
    >> I did just over 8,000km on my Dawes Sonoran last year. But it wasn't until
    >> I started noticing the odd chain skip that I thought I probably ought to
    >> check the chain for wear. It should be noted here that all my cycling is
    >> on dusty back lanes in Breckland, Norfolk (PSF Country) where the soil is
    >> very sandy and abrasive.
    >>

    >
    > This is why I have a personal bike mechanic, known as Vernon. He looks after
    > the Unfit Family steeds very well indeed. In his rides to college & back,
    > even a week can thoroughly knacker the chain on Nathan's Nigel Dean. Vernon
    > has to check it and clean it weekly, and in the winter more often to keep
    > all in good working order.And the amount of salt on the roads is
    > astonishing - it's Corrosionville out there.


    My father is an engineer and would bring back anti-corrosion stuff for
    testing. Horribly expensive sprays [1] that are designed for the splash zone
    on North Sea oil rigs work a treat for corrosion resistance.

    I was, however, left to do most of the bike maintenance myself.

    ...d
     
  9. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    > This is why I have a personal bike mechanic, known as Vernon. He

    looks after
    > the Unfit Family steeds very well indeed. In his rides to college &

    back,
    > even a week can thoroughly knacker the chain on Nathan's Nigel Dean.

    Vernon
    > has to check it and clean it weekly, and in the winter more often to

    keep
    > all in good working order.And the amount of salt on the roads is
    > astonishing - it's Corrosionville out there.


    Nathan sure has you two well trained. Bought him a new trike and doing
    all his maintenance for him too. Now that deserves a gold star.

    > Commisserations. I fyou need any tools - Vernon has loads - so get in

    touch
    > if you need anything.


    Oooooh, below the belt, offering to lend out someone else's tools!

    > Cheers, helen s
     
  10. Succorso

    Succorso Guest

    wafflycat wrote:
    >
    >
    > Commisserations. I fyou need any tools - Vernon has loads - so get in
    > touch if you need anything.
    >
    > Cheers, helen s
    >
    >


    Awww, thanks Helen. I should be ok - I'll keep you posted :)

    --
    Chris
     
  11. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    wafflycat wrote:

    > In his rides to college & back, even a week can thoroughly knacker
    > the chain on Nathan's Nigel Dean. Vernon has to check it and clean
    > it weekly, and in the winter more often to keep all in good working
    > order.And the amount of salt on the roads is astonishing - it's
    > Corrosionville out there.


    Doing mine daily at the moment. I'm on my second new chain of the year
    already.

    --
    Dave...
     
  12. Succorso

    Succorso Guest

    dkahn400 wrote:
    > wafflycat wrote:
    >
    >
    >>In his rides to college & back, even a week can thoroughly knacker
    >>the chain on Nathan's Nigel Dean. Vernon has to check it and clean
    >>it weekly, and in the winter more often to keep all in good working
    >>order.And the amount of salt on the roads is astonishing - it's
    >>Corrosionville out there.

    >
    >
    > Doing mine daily at the moment. I'm on my second new chain of the year
    > already.
    >


    What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I have
    no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".

    --
    Chris
     
  13. LSMike

    LSMike Guest

    Succorso wrote:
    >
    > What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    > immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I

    have
    > no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".
    >
    > --
    > Chris


    I think everyone has their own routine. I guess maintenance as often
    as that would be only a wipedown to remove most of the crud and a
    relubrication? Certainly that's all I'm doing.

    About once a week or fortnight I'll run the chain through one of those
    chain cleaning machines and then re-lube it for a more complete clean.
     
  14. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Succorso <[email protected]> wrote:

    : What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    : immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I have
    : no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".

    For me, it very much depends. On my commuter bike, I frequently just dump
    more oil on top of the mess. Ride to work in salt and slush, leave bike
    in warm hallway for the day, ride home and find chain is completely dry
    and covered with salt. Wack some more oil on so that I can ride to the
    pub.

    This isn't recommended but it does keep stuff running.

    A better plan (but still minimal) is to buy some spray degreaser and a big box
    of latex gloves. Pop on a pair of gloves, spray degreaser on a rag, wipe the
    chain clean. Then use a dry portion of the rag to wipe the degreaser off
    and apply more oil.

    I wouldn't just do this to anything except my commuting bike, but that one
    needs to keep running.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune PGP/GPG Key: http://www.clune.org/pubkey.txt
    It is better to light a candle than to curse the darkness
     
  15. James Annan

    James Annan Guest

    Succorso wrote:

    > dkahn400 wrote:
    >
    >> wafflycat wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>> In his rides to college & back, even a week can thoroughly knacker
    >>> the chain on Nathan's Nigel Dean. Vernon has to check it and clean
    >>> it weekly, and in the winter more often to keep all in good working
    >>> order.And the amount of salt on the roads is astonishing - it's
    >>> Corrosionville out there.

    >>
    >>
    >>
    >> Doing mine daily at the moment. I'm on my second new chain of the year
    >> already.
    >>

    >
    > What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    > immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I have
    > no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".


    Ours gets done about once a year whether it needs it or not.

    Admittedly, it is a lot drier here in Japan. But also a lot wetter too!

    James
     
  16. dkahn400

    dkahn400 Guest

    Succorso wrote:
    > dkahn400 wrote:


    > > Doing mine daily at the moment. I'm on my second new chain of
    > > the year already.

    >
    > What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    > immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I
    > have no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".


    No, not the whole megillah. I get a paper towel in the palm of my hand
    and pour some degreaser onto it. Then hold it round the bottom run of
    the chain while turning the pedals backwards a few times. Any really
    cacky bits get a few drops of degreaser directly on them and another
    swoosh through the paper towel, which is then wiped over the
    derailleurs, the chain stay, the chainwheel, and the derailleur jockey
    wheels. Note this is a relatively gentle degreaser - not white spirit
    or citrus degreaser which you wouldn't want to put neat on your
    paintwork.

    I then take a clean wad of paper towel and run the chain through it
    until it comes off clean and dry. After that I drip chain saw oil onto
    the top of the bottom run of the chain as I turn the pedals slowly
    backwards, getting at least a drop on every roller. I keep turning the
    pedals to work the oil in then run the chain through my fingers a
    couple of times to make sure there is a thin film of oil over the
    entire surface including the side plates. I then leave it overnight and
    run the chain through yet another wad of paper towel the next morning,
    removing as much of the oil as I can; the oil I want to leave should
    now be inside the rollers plus the very thin film that remains on the
    surface.

    The whole job takes about 5 minutes, not including the overnight wait.

    >From time to time (every 2 or 3 weeks) I do also take break the chain,

    shake and soak it in white spirit, put it in an ultrasonic cleaner (not
    sure how useful this step is but you'd be amazed how much gunk comes
    out of an apparently perfectly clean and shiny chain), put it back on
    the bike and re-oil it. I'm not sure how much difference any of this
    makes really; I think it has a touch of the magic ritual about it. It
    does make the chain look very clean if that's important to you, but
    it's too much to do every day.

    --
    Dave...
     
  17. Jack Ouzzi wrote:
    >>I feel a divorce in the air

    >
    >Ohhhh I will marry Helen, then I can get all my bikes serviced,


    Surely you would need to marry Vernon for that, not Helen?
     
  18. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Succorso wrote:
    >
    > What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    > immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I have
    > no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".
    >


    Look at it this way. How much does a new chain cost? How much do you
    spend on fancy oils and cleaners not to say your time to extend its life
    just a bit. As long as you change it before its elongated too much and
    starting to wear the cassette and chainwheels, you a far better off
    doing minimal maintenance with cheap lubricants and change the chain
    more often. YMMV

    Tony
     
  19. Succorso

    Succorso Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    > Succorso wrote:
    >
    >>
    >> What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    >> immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I have
    >> no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".
    >>

    >
    > Look at it this way. How much does a new chain cost? How much do you
    > spend on fancy oils and cleaners not to say your time to extend its life
    > just a bit. As long as you change it before its elongated too much and
    > starting to wear the cassette and chainwheels, you a far better off
    > doing minimal maintenance with cheap lubricants and change the chain
    > more often. YMMV
    >
    > Tony


    You may be right - one could go mad with this!

    I've fitted the new cassette and chain (all OK now, apart from a few
    skips on the middle chainwheel under heavy load in bottom gear - I can
    live with that) and all is right with the world again. But just fiddling
    up and down the lane here, doing some testing, and the new chain is
    already "gritty", so the erosion process has already started.

    Like you say - 15 notes for a new chain isn't much - I just need to
    monitor it this time (like I didn't last year!).

    Cheers for all the info/help everyone!

    --
    Chris
     
  20. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    in message <[email protected]>, Tony Raven
    ('[email protected]') wrote:

    > Succorso wrote:
    >>
    >> What does daily chain cleaning entail? Surely not full removal and
    >> immersion? As a self confessed, inexperienced bike maintainer - I
    >> have no idea what is "sufficient" or "reasonable".

    >
    > Look at it this way. How much does a new chain cost?


    About twenty five squids if it's Campag ten speed, or about twenty three
    squids if it's el-cheapo non-Campag-but-Campag-compatible ten speed
    chain.

    > How much do you
    > spend on fancy oils and cleaners not to say your time to extend its
    > life just a bit


    Quite a bit, frankly.

    With my non-Campag chains I regularly take 'em off the bike and shake
    'em up in a bottle of white spirit. The Campag chain, however, is a
    total pain to get on and off the bike so I use one of these inline
    scrubbing baths for it. When it needs to be replaced I'll get a
    compatible chain with some sort of a power link...

    Of course Campag recommend _never_ cleaning or relubing a chain, but
    then I expect they intend you to replace them more often than I do.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
    ;; Skill without imagination is craftsmanship and gives us
    ;; many useful objects such as wickerwork picnic baskets.
    ;; Imagination without skill gives us modern art.
    ;; Tom Stoppard, Artist Descending A Staircase
     
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