waitrose free hire of bike trailers



R

roger merriman

Guest
as subject, just noticed that watrose are doing this at least the one
on upper richmound road is. not a bad idea really be intresting to
know how much it gets used.

roger
 
P

POHB

Guest
On 11 Feb, 10:55, roger merriman <[email protected]> wrote:
> as subject, just noticed that watrose are doing this at least the one
> on upper richmound road is. not a bad idea really be intresting to
> know how much it gets used.


They've been doing it for ages at Ealing. You need a Waitrose card to
use them. They let you keep them for a couple of days so could be
handy if you've got a trip to the dump or something.
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 02:55:44 -0800 (PST) someone who may be roger
merriman <[email protected]> wrote this:-

>as subject, just noticed that watrose are doing this at least the one
>on upper richmound road is. not a bad idea really be intresting to
>know how much it gets used.


Certain supermarkets have tried this sort of thing from time to
time. I recall Tesco trying it in places 5-10 years ago.

Bike Hod are perhaps encouraging supermarkets to try it, or have
what appears to be the best trailer for such tasks, as they have
featured in every scheme I have heard about.

Whether one should be regularly purchasing a Bike Hod full of stuff
from a supermarket (and all the packaging which goes with it) is
another matter. The average family now spends £470 on packaging
every year.


--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
 
D

David Lloyd

Guest
On 11 Feb, 11:57, POHB <[email protected]> wrote:
> On 11 Feb, 10:55, roger merriman <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> > as subject, just noticed that watrose are doing this at least the one
> > on upper richmound road is. not a bad idea really be intresting to
> > know how much it gets used.

>
> They've been doing it for ages at Ealing.  You need a Waitrose card to
> use them.  They let you keep them for a couple of days so could be
> handy if you've got a trip to the dump or something.


In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
Health & Safety grounds. Doesn't it just make your blood boil! It
wouldn't be so bad if they collected stuff like plastic and cardboard
with all the other recyclables. Then again, I don't think we have a
local Waitrose, so the use of their trailers is a bit of a moot point.

David Lloyd
 
P

Paul Boyd

Guest
POHB said the following on 11/02/2008 11:57:

> They've been doing it for ages at Ealing. You need a Waitrose card to
> use them. They let you keep them for a couple of days so could be
> handy if you've got a trip to the dump or something.


Assuming you're actually allowed to cycle (or walk!) into the dump, that
is. Many councils will only allow you take a car or van in. Apparently
this is to do with H&S, although if that really was the case you
wouldn't be allowed out of your car to walk around the scattered bins
for every different type of rubbish!

--
Paul Boyd
http://www.paul-boyd.co.uk/
 
R

roger merriman

Guest
On 11 Feb, 13:06, David Hansen <[email protected]>
wrote:
> On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 02:55:44 -0800 (PST) someone who may be roger
> merriman <[email protected]> wrote this:-
>
> >as subject, just noticed that watrose are doing this at least the one
> >on upper richmound road is. not a bad idea really be intresting to
> >know how much it gets used.

>
> Certain supermarkets have tried this sort of thing from time to
> time. I recall Tesco trying it in places 5-10 years ago.
>
> Bike Hod are perhaps encouraging supermarkets to try it, or have
> what appears to be the best trailer for such tasks, as they have
> featured in every scheme I have heard about.
>
> Whether one should be regularly purchasing a Bike Hod full of stuff
> from a supermarket (and all the packaging which goes with it) is
> another matter. The average family now spends £470 on packaging
> every year.
>
> --
>   David Hansen, Edinburgh
>  I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
>  http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54


packaging seems to be one of those things a bit like tax.

ie people say they want less yet go for the easy option.

still if it gets a few more folk using bike than car, can't be a bad
thing.

roger
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Mon, 11 Feb 2008 04:11:44 -0800 (PST) someone who may be David
Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:-

>In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
>Health & Safety grounds.


What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
encouraging cycling?


--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
 
C

chris French

Guest
In message
<[email protected]m>,
POHB <[email protected]> writes
>On 11 Feb, 10:55, roger merriman <[email protected]> wrote:
>> as subject, just noticed that watrose are doing this at least the one
>> on upper richmound road is. not a bad idea really be intresting to
>> know how much it gets used.

>
>They've been doing it for ages at Ealing. You need a Waitrose card to
>use them. They let you keep them for a couple of days so could be
>handy if you've got a trip to the dump or something.


Ahh, I saw what looked like bike trailer at a Waitrose in Cambridge (big
one out near Trumpington Park and ride)
--
Chris French
 
J

JNugent

Guest
David Hansen wrote:

> Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:


>> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
>> Health & Safety grounds.


> What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
> at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
> encouraging cycling?


What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a pedestrian?
 
R

roger merriman

Guest
On 12 Feb, 10:41, JNugent <[email protected]> wrote:
> David Hansen wrote:
> > Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:
> >> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
> >> Health & Safety grounds.

> > What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
> > at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
> > encouraging cycling?

>
> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
> bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a pedestrian?


got something light small that the bin folk don't take, or don't have
a car maybe? as fare number don't have cars in london and other big
cities. okay they aren't going to bring a house clearance but they
might bring a old pc or telly etc.

roger
 
N

Nigel Cliffe

Guest
JNugent wrote:
> David Hansen wrote:
>
>> Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:

>
>>> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
>>> Health & Safety grounds.

>
>> What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
>> at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
>> encouraging cycling?

>
> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
> bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a
> pedestrian?


My bike has panniers, which can carry various items. My last trip to the
council dump/recycling point had a few small batteries, an aluminium pan
without handle, some small dead electrical appliances.

Its considered "odd" when the social norm is to start up the car and burn
loads of petrol to do the same short trip. By car, a trip to "recycle" is
debatable in its environmental impact.

I expect to do the same cycle trip again later this week; there is a dead
electric blanket to dump.


I'll use the car for such trips if its appropriate; some things won't fit on
my bicycle and if the weather is foul, I will use the car.


- Nigel


--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
D

David Martin

Guest
On Feb 12, 9:41 am, JNugent <[email protected]> wrote:
> David Hansen wrote:
> > Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:
> >> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
> >> Health & Safety grounds.

> > What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
> > at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
> > encouraging cycling?

>
> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
> bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a pedestrian?


Because I couldn't fit the bed on my car, but could quite happily take
it on the bike.

See http://farm1.static.flickr.com/186/373279703_ec152db8da.jpg?v=0

I could fit more recycling in the bike trailer than in the boot of my
then car.

...d
 
J

JNugent

Guest
roger merriman wrote:
> On 12 Feb, 10:41, JNugent <[email protected]> wrote:
>> David Hansen wrote:
>>> Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:
>>>> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
>>>> Health & Safety grounds.
>>> What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
>>> at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
>>> encouraging cycling?

>> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
>> bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a pedestrian?

>
> got something light small that the bin folk don't take, or don't have
> a car maybe?


Yes, well, I suppose that's a fair (and relatively obvious) point - but
you could drop anything really small into the bin irrespective of "the
rools" - or put it in a public litter bin.

> as fare number don't have cars in london and other big
> cities. okay they aren't going to bring a house clearance but they
> might bring a old pc or telly etc.


Really?

Round here, the council will collect that sort of stuff - or a 3-piece
suite or bed - FOC (presumably because it is recognised that not
everyone has access to a car, or perhaps even to a big enough car).
 
J

JNugent

Guest
Nigel Cliffe wrote:
> JNugent wrote:
>> David Hansen wrote:
>>
>>> Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:
>>>> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
>>>> Health & Safety grounds.
>>> What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
>>> at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
>>> encouraging cycling?

>> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
>> bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a
>> pedestrian?

>
> My bike has panniers, which can carry various items. My last trip to the
> council dump/recycling point had a few small batteries, an aluminium pan
> without handle, some small dead electrical appliances.
>
> Its considered "odd" when the social norm is to start up the car and burn
> loads of petrol to do the same short trip. By car, a trip to "recycle" is
> debatable in its environmental impact.
>
> I expect to do the same cycle trip again later this week; there is a dead
> electric blanket to dump.
>
>
> I'll use the car for such trips if its appropriate; some things won't fit on
> my bicycle and if the weather is foul, I will use the car.


Doesn't your local council do a recycling collection (for paper,
plastics, etc)? And aren't things like electric blakets (or ordinary
ones) just put in the general compacted rubbish anyway (meaning they
might just as well go in the bin)?

I was down at the local recycling point a few weeks ago - one of the
items to be discarded was a (small) piece of (intact) furniture. I
thought that wood would be recycled specially - but no, (on instruction)
straight into the big crusher with all the rest of the general refuse it
went!
 
J

JNugent

Guest
David Martin wrote:
> On Feb 12, 9:41 am, JNugent <[email protected]> wrote:
>> David Hansen wrote:
>>> Lloyd <[email protected]> wrote this:
>>>> In Walsall, they don't allow you into our local dump on bicycle, on
>>>> Health & Safety grounds.
>>> What does your local councillor say when you point out that this is
>>> at variance with the words the council undoubtedly has about
>>> encouraging cycling?

>> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on a
>> bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a pedestrian?

>
> Because I couldn't fit the bed on my car, but could quite happily take
> it on the bike.
>
> See http://farm1.static.flickr.com/186/373279703_ec152db8da.jpg?v=0
>
> I could fit more recycling in the bike trailer than in the boot of my
> then car.


I see...

But I think you'll agree that that is unusual. And in any case, most LAs
have a free collection service for bulky items like beds and large
furniture. The fact that you wouldn't/couldn't take those things in most
cars tells you all you need to know, really...

Mind you, you do see a few people turning up at the "tip" in larger vans
- with the council staff eyeing them up suspiciously!
 
D

David Hansen

Guest
On Tue, 12 Feb 2008 02:02:59 -0800 (PST) someone who may be David
Martin <[email protected]> wrote this:-

>Because I couldn't fit the bed on my car, but could quite happily take
>it on the bike.


That's a lot better than paying the council, in my case, ten or
forty pounds to collect it.
<http://www.fifedirect.org.uk/topics/index.cfm?fuseaction=service.display&subjectid=A3D3D0E9-3F7B-451E-BE0DD78A8E8A8FBD&objectid=D222092F-9766-4FA7-B2CEED109B322828>

Some people allege that in Scotland money from the English taxpayer
flows like water and as a result we never pay for anything
ourselves...



--
David Hansen, Edinburgh
I will *always* explain revoked encryption keys, unless RIP prevents me
http://www.opsi.gov.uk/acts/acts2000/00023--e.htm#54
 
J

JNugent

Guest
David Hansen wrote:

> David Martin <[email protected]> wrote:


>> Because I couldn't fit the bed on my car, but could quite happily take
>> it on the bike.


> That's a lot better than paying the council, in my case, ten or
> forty pounds to collect it.
> <http://www.fifedirect.org.uk/topics/index.cfm?fuseaction=service.display&subjectid=A3D3D0E9-3F7B-451E-BE0DD78A8E8A8FBD&objectid=D222092F-9766-4FA7-B2CEED109B322828>


> Some people allege that in Scotland money from the English taxpayer
> flows like water and as a result we never pay for anything
> ourselves...


The solution is in your own hands (literally, in the form of a pencil),
every few years.
 
N

Nigel Cliffe

Guest
JNugent wrote:
> Nigel Cliffe wrote:
>> JNugent wrote:
>>> What would be the point of going to the tip (or recycling point) on
>>> a bicycle? Come to that, what be the point in going there as a
>>> pedestrian?

>>
>> My bike has panniers, which can carry various items. My last trip to
>> the council dump/recycling point had a few small batteries, an
>> aluminium pan without handle, some small dead electrical appliances.
>>
>> Its considered "odd" when the social norm is to start up the car and
>> burn loads of petrol to do the same short trip. By car, a trip to
>> "recycle" is debatable in its environmental impact.
>>
>> I expect to do the same cycle trip again later this week; there is a
>> dead electric blanket to dump.

>
> Doesn't your local council do a recycling collection (for paper,
> plastics, etc)?


Yes on plastics, bottles, paper and metal tins. We sort things to the
appropriate bin.
Some of our paper and almost all glass goes in the village recycle bin
(short walk away) as the parish council then gets a direct cut on the
revenue when they are emptied.

No for batteries, electrical goods, large metal items, etc, unless you
deliver them to the tip.

Compostable material can be collected for a fee, though I have enough space
for compost heaps of my own. Adding shredded paper helps with the "woody"
content against large volumes of grass clippings.


> And aren't things like electric blakets (or ordinary
> ones) just put in the general compacted rubbish anyway (meaning they
> might just as well go in the bin)?


Blanket probably yes. Control gear for it, not if I put it in the electrical
pile (where it should be).



> I was down at the local recycling point a few weeks ago - one of the
> items to be discarded was a (small) piece of (intact) furniture. I
> thought that wood would be recycled specially - but no, (on
> instruction) straight into the big crusher with all the rest of the
> general refuse it went!


I find such behaviour to be silly - not even putting burnable material into
a power station or heating device.
I occaisionally rescue items which are destined for skips from neighbours. I
recently recovered, with permission, a garden table (required minor repairs)
and a couple of arm chairs (required varnishing). If anyone would like a
rather nice pair of restored Ercol arm chairs, ideal for a conservatory,
drop me an email :)




--
Nigel Cliffe,
Webmaster at http://www.2mm.org.uk/
 
P

PK

Guest
"David Hansen" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> That's a lot better than paying the council, in my case, ten or
> forty pounds to collect it.
> <http://www.fifedirect.org.uk/topics/index.cfm?fuseaction=service.display&subjectid=A3D3D0E9-3F7B-451E-BE0DD78A8E8A8FBD&objectid=D222092F-9766-4FA7-B2CEED109B322828>




Arrrgh!#


What on earth is a "special uplift" - do they perhaps mean "special
collection" - I truly despair at the use of English in many council
publications!

What the hell are they going to do, bring along a set of legs to stand the
item on!!!!!

pk
 
P

POHB

Guest
On 11 Feb, 14:21, roger merriman <[email protected]> wrote:
> > Whether one should be regularly purchasing a Bike Hod full of stuff
> > from a supermarket (and all the packaging which goes with it) is
> > another matter. The average family now spends £470 on packaging
> > every year.

> packaging seems to be one of those things a bit like tax.
> ie people say they want less yet go for the easy option.


Well I suppose I could open all the cans and bottles of beer and wine
and pour them into my own reusable container at the checkout, but I
suspect the beer would go flat on the way home.
 

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