Want to know more about the bicycles



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Z

Zhang Li Yun

Guest
Hi all

I want to know more about the bicycles, such as what are the suitable size, feature for road bike?
And what are the other accessories i need to prepare for cycling?

Thank you
 
L

Luther Blissett

Guest
Zhang Li Yun wrote:
> Hi all
>
> I want to know more about the bicycles, such as what are the suitable size, feature for road bike?
> And what are the other accessories i need to prepare for cycling?
>
> Thank you
>
>
Best to get thee to the local reputable bike shop. They would be best to advise what suits your
budget.Where are you located? We could recommend some shops.

As well as the bike as a bare minimum you will need a helmet, a pump and a puncture repair kit.

--
Cheers LB
 
A

Andy G

Guest
also, what kind of riding do you wish to do? here in the country it is ideal for mountain biking

in the city a faster bike might be better.

the best feature for good cycling is strong legs! Once you are proficient at riding and have an
appreciation of the machine you are on and know what you want to do then you will know what to get.
a good secondhand machine fitted by a reputable bike shop will do. "Zhang Li Yun"
<[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Hi all
>
> I want to know more about the bicycles, such as what are the suitable
size,
> feature for road bike? And what are the other accessories i need to
prepare
> for cycling?
>
> Thank you
 
D

Deep Flayed Mar

Guest
Luther Blissett <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Zhang Li Yun wrote:
> > Hi all
> >
> > I want to know more about the bicycles, such as what are the suitable
size,
> > feature for road bike? And what are the other accessories i need to
prepare
> > for cycling?
> >
> > Thank you
> >
> >
> Best to get thee to the local reputable bike shop. They would be best to advise what suits your
> budget.Where are you located? We could recommend some shops.
>
> As well as the bike as a bare minimum you will need a helmet, a pump and a puncture repair kit.

If it's mainly urban riding you are planning, I would say you don't need a pump and puncture repair
kit as much as front / rear lights, and a good lock. I would also put mudguards higher on the list
of necessities too.

With reasonable tires, punctures should be rare, and service stations has pumps which are
usually free.
---
DFM
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
0
0
Zhang Li Yun, having spent a considerable amount of time in China, which is where I assume you are from, good luck. I've seen millions of bicycles in China, but I'm yet to see a decent road bike (come to that there aren't many decent roads for riding a good road bike on, but the potential is there). If you live anywhere away from the big cities on the east coast of China, you'll be taking your life into your own hands. The trucks are overloaded and omnipresent, car drivers have no regard for road rules and cyclists are very vulnerable.

It's sad to see the demise of the bicycle as a means of transport in China. More and more cars are on the road every day and cyclists are gradually being squeezed out of their dominant position on the roads, especially in urban areas.

I'm sure there are good road bike made in China and it might take a bit of searching to find a manufacturer and sales agent. Then you have the issue of security of your beautiful machine, if you buy one.

Good luck with your search.
 
G

Gary K

Guest
Spider1977 <[email protected]> wrote:

> Zhang Li Yun, having spent a considerable amount of time in China, which is where I assume you are
> from, good luck. I've seen millions of bicycles in China, but I'm yet to see a decent road bike
> (come to that there aren't many decent roads for riding a good road bike on, but the potential is
> there). If you live anywhere away from the big cities on the east coast of China, you'll be taking
> your life into your own hands. The trucks are overloaded and omnipresent, car drivers have no
> regard for road rules and cyclists are very vulnerable.
>
> It's sad to see the demise of the bicycle as a means of transport in China. More and more cars are
> on the road every day and cyclists are gradually being squeezed out of their dominant position on
> the roads, especially in urban areas.
>
> I'm sure there are good road bike made in China and it might take a bit of searching to find a
> manufacturer and sales agent. Then you have the issue of security of your beautiful machine, if
> you buy one.
>
> Good luck with your search.

China? The original posting is from the Uni of WA...
 

Spider1977

New Member
Jul 19, 2003
446
0
0
China? The original posting is from the Uni of WA... [/B][/QUOTE]

How'd you work that out?
 
G

Gary K

Guest
Spider1977 <[email protected]> wrote:

> China? The original posting is from the Uni of WA...
>
> How'd you work that out?

er, i mean Curtin U, in WA
 
L

Leon

Guest
"Deep Flayed Mares" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:gkV%[email protected]...
> Luther Blissett <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]...
> > Zhang Li Yun wrote:
> > > Hi all
> > >
> > > I want to know more about the bicycles, such as what are the suitable
> size,
> > > feature for road bike? And what are the other accessories i need to
> prepare
> > > for cycling?
> > >
> > > Thank you
> > >
> > >
> > Best to get thee to the local reputable bike shop. They would be best to advise what suits your
> > budget.Where are you located? We could recommend some shops.
> >
> > As well as the bike as a bare minimum you will need a helmet, a pump and a puncture repair kit.
>
> If it's mainly urban riding you are planning, I would say you don't need a pump and puncture
> repair kit as much as front / rear lights, and a good lock. I would also put mudguards higher on
> the list of necessities too.
>
> With reasonable tires, punctures should be rare, and service stations has pumps which are
> usually free.
> ---
> DFM
>
>
You stupid... is essential that you have a hand pump, puncture repair kit and a helmet to
protect your head. Dont go with out these 3 items. you can go with out it like DFM if your bike
grows cob web.

Other things that is good to have is front and rear lights, gloves, lock, foot pump and spare tubes.

Forget about mudguards they are for geeks.
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"Leon" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> > If it's mainly urban riding you are planning, I would say you don't
need a
> > pump and puncture repair kit as much as front / rear lights, and a
good
> > lock. I would also put mudguards higher on the list of necessities
too.
> >
> > With reasonable tires, punctures should be rare, and service
stations has
> > pumps which are usually free. DFM
> >
> You stupid... is essential that you have a hand pump, puncture repair
kit
> and a helmet to protect your head. Dont go with out these 3 items. you can go with out it
> like DFM if
your bike
> grows cob web.

Eh?! Like DFM said, if you are riding in the city, you generally don't need a pump or a puncture
kit. I carry a pump because I have one and it mounts neatly to the frame. What happens when I get a
puncture? Tyre goes down and I walk to the train! Carrying a spare tube and some tyre levers (if you
need them) would be better idea than a pump - servo pumps work fine. If you have presta valves - get
the tiny presta-to-schraeder adapter. I've never done a roadside puncture repair. I carry spare
tubes on long rides and find other transport on urban rides (if I puncture).

> Other things that is good to have is front and rear lights, gloves,
lock,
> foot pump and spare tubes.

Lights for night riding certainly, I only bought gloves when my rides started getting up near
100k's. But I might have a higher pain threshold (read: stupidity level) than most riders! It's
actually nice to ditch the gloves every now and then. Lock is only necessary if you leave your bike
outside. If you have a nice boss (like mine) you can bring your bike into the office! :) Foot pump?!
Aren't they for lilos down at the beach/camping? I have hand pumps and a track pump. But neither of
these HAVE to be carried on a ride.

> Forget about mudguards they are for geeks.
...and people who want to stay clean and dry. (Having said that, I don't own any - but then
sometimes I like to get dirty!) :)

hippy
 
D

Deep Flayed Mar

Guest
Leon <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
>
> "Deep Flayed Mares" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:gkV%[email protected]...
> > Luther Blissett <[email protected]> wrote
in
> > message news:[email protected]...
> > > Zhang Li Yun wrote:
> > > > Hi all
> > > >
> > > > I want to know more about the bicycles, such as what are the
suitable
> > size,
> > > > feature for road bike? And what are the other accessories i need to
> > prepare
> > > > for cycling?
> > > >
> > > > Thank you
> > > >
> > > >
> > > Best to get thee to the local reputable bike shop. They would be best
to
> > > advise what suits your budget.Where are you located? We could
recommend
> > > some shops.
> > >
> > > As well as the bike as a bare minimum you will need a helmet, a pump
and
> > > a puncture repair kit.
> >
> > If it's mainly urban riding you are planning, I would say you don't need
a
> > pump and puncture repair kit as much as front / rear lights, and a good lock. I would also put
> > mudguards higher on the list of necessities too.
> >
> > With reasonable tires, punctures should be rare, and service stations
has
> > pumps which are usually free.
> > ---
> > DFM
> >
> >
> You stupid... is essential that you have a hand pump, puncture repair kit and a helmet to protect
> your head. Dont go with out these 3 items. you can go with out it like DFM if your
bike
> grows cob web.

?????

I think you tried to insult me, but you wrote it so incomprehensibly that it's hard to tell.

Like Hippy said, puncture repair kits and pumps are far from essential. I can't recall the last
time I saw someone patching a tire on the side of the road. Why bother when you can get a tube
for only $4?
---
DFM
 
S

Shane Stanley

Guest
in article [email protected], hippy wrote:

> if you are riding in the city, you generally don't need a pump or a puncture kit.

When I bought my first bike in many years, I asked the salesman about repair kits. He recommended
what he carried: a mobile phone and taxi fare.

Shane Stanley
 
T

Tim Jones

Guest
"Spider1977" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected].chariot.net.au...
> China? The original posting is from the Uni of WA...
>
> How'd you work that out?
>

Looking at the Organisation in the post header.

If you are using Outlook Express, to view the header, click on the message and go to
file|properties, then click on the details tab. That will give you fields that can help you see
where they are posting from.

Tim
 
A

Andrew Swan

Guest
Deeply Flawed Mores wrote:
> Like Hippy said, puncture repair kits and pumps are far from essential. I can't recall the last
> time I saw someone patching a tire on the side of the road. Why bother when you can get a tube for
> only $4?
> ---
> DFM
>
You must mean US$4 judging by the way you spelled "tyre", which is a bit more expensive in the
nicely-coloured money we use here.

Me, I always carry a spare tube, pump, and patch kit, whether I'm doing my 4km commute, my 30km
morning training, a rec ride with my partner, or my occasional 100km+ forays on the weekends. To
answer your question, if you'd been in Centennial Park (that's in Sydney, Australia) last week,
you'd have seen me changing a tube then. If service stations were omnipresent and/or public
transport went where I want, when I want it, at a sensible price, why would there be bike commuters
in the first place (apart from it's fun and I don't have to jam my 187cm into a tiny bus seat next
to a smelly tramp [that's "bum" to you in the US] or a kid with a doof-doof Walkman)?

&roo
 
D

Deep Flayed Mar

Guest
Andrew Swan <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Deeply Flawed Mores wrote:
> > Like Hippy said, puncture repair kits and pumps are far from essential.
I
> > can't recall the last time I saw someone patching a tire on the side of
the
> > road. Why bother when you can get a tube for only $4?
> > ---
> > DFM
> >
> You must mean US$4 judging by the way you spelled "tyre", which is a bit more expensive in the
> nicely-coloured money we use here.

********! One small spelling mistake, and you think I'm a yank?

Actually I will profess to not having bought a tube for a while (coz I have not had a puncture
for years), so I guess they cost more now. Either way, good tires and good aim should mean
punctures are rare.
---
DFM
 
H

Hippy

Guest
"Andrew Swan" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> You must mean US$4 judging by the way you spelled "tyre", which is a bit more expensive in the
> nicely-coloured money we use here.

I pay roughly $7 per tube.

> Me, I always carry a spare tube, pump, and patch kit, whether I'm doing my 4km commute, my 30km
> morning training, a rec ride with my partner, or

Now, this is possibly one of the most pointless arguments i've had, but... on a 4k commute, when you
carry a spare tube, why do you need a patch kit too? I could walk the 4k quicker than I could remove
the tube, find the puncture, scrub it, whack some glue on, wait for it to go sticky, patch it, wait
a bit more, reinstall tube. Maybe on an out-of-the-way 100k training ride a patch kit is useful, but
30k's? How far away is public transport for you? I have it good because I ride along a train line,
but still, there's lots of people with cars and taxi's, buses, trains, trams, boats, planes.. okay
so I'm getting a little carried away ;)

> if you'd been in Centennial Park (that's in Sydney, Australia) last week, you'd have seen me
> changing a tube then. If service stations were

So, Sydney-siders, how far away is the nearest servo and/or train station from Centennial Park?

> omnipresent and/or public transport went where I want, when I want it,

Service stations AREN'T omnipresent?!? They always seem that way to me! It can't be much more than a
2k walk between any servo on _my_ commute.

> at a sensible price, why would there be bike commuters in the first place (apart from it's fun and
> I don't have to jam my 187cm into a tiny bus seat next to a smelly tramp [that's "bum" to you in
> the US] or a kid with a doof-doof Walkman)?

Hey, leave the doofers alone!

hippy | yppih drunk, doofing and proud! (or something)
 
G

Gary K

Guest
Shane Stanley <[email protected]> wrote:

> in article [email protected], hippy wrote:
>
> > if you are riding in the city, you generally don't need a pump or a puncture kit.
>
> When I bought my first bike in many years, I asked the salesman about repair kits. He recommended
> what he carried: a mobile phone and taxi fare.

I was talking to another cyclist while out on the road one day, when I noticed he had no pump nor
spare tube. So I asked him what he does when he punctures. From his employer he gets free Cabcharge
vouchers, so thats what he'd use...

Personally, I'd like to repair the flat so's i can get back into the training ride.
 
D

Deep Flayed Mar

Guest
> Personally, I'd like to repair the flat so's i can get back into the training ride.

Given that you have to wait for the glue to dry, how long does it actually take to repair a
puncture? I would think that if you could fix a hole in 30 mins you would be doing well. Personally,
$7 for a new tube would be money well spent for me. My time is worth more than $14 / hour.

*shrug*
---
DFM
 
T

Theo Bekkers

Guest
"hippy" wrote

> Service stations AREN'T omnipresent?!? They always seem that way to me! It can't be much more than
> a 2k walk between any servo on _my_ commute.

On my way to work (by motorcycle, it's 55 kms) I pass two servos, and I work 3 kms from the centre
of Perth. That'd be a long walk with a flat tyre.

Theo
 
T

Tim Jones

Guest
"Deep Flayed Mares" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> >
> > Personally, I'd like to repair the flat so's i can get back into the training ride.
>
> Given that you have to wait for the glue to dry, how long does it actually take to repair a
> puncture? I would think that if you could fix a hole in
30
> mins you would be doing well. Personally, $7 for a new tube would be money well spent for me. My
> time is worth more than $14 / hour.
>
> *shrug*
> ---
> DFM
>

If you carry a spare and a repair kit you have more options.

You can replace the tyre, then at work/home/destination repair the puncture in under 5 minutes, then
you have a spare for the next ride.

Also, if you get a second flat away from public transport/access to taxis etc......

Tim
 
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