Wanted: Bike travel box

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Msa, Feb 1, 2004.

Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
  1. Msa

    Msa Guest

    Just on the off chance...

    If anyone has a bike box (not bag) that's suitable for air travel that they would like to sell,
    please contact me.

    Thanks,

    --
    Mark (MSA) This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not volume. Some settling of contents may
    have occurred during transmission
     
    Tags:


  2. On Sun, 1 Feb 2004 20:10:32 +0000 (UTC), in
    <[email protected]>, MSA
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Just on the off chance...
    >
    >If anyone has a bike box (not bag) that's suitable for air travel that they would like to sell,
    >please contact me.

    Don't get excited - I don't have one to sell.

    But I do have an idea that somebody may wish to develop if it doesn't already exist: A bike box
    which on arrival at the destination can be reasonably easily converted into a bike trailer. Retractable/Screw-
    in axles, coupling system that detatches and fits around the internal perimeter of the box. Somehow
    it would need to be able to contain not only the bike but also a pair of say 20" wheels.

    Buy me a pint when you're a millionaire...
    --
    I remember when the internet was only in black & white. It only had a few pages but at least they
    all worked. Email: Put only the word "richard" before the @ sign.
     
  3. Mikesbikes

    Mikesbikes Guest

    "Richard Bates" <[email protected]> wrote in
    message news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 1 Feb 2004 20:10:32 +0000 (UTC), in <[email protected]>, MSA
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >Just on the off chance...
    > >
    > >If anyone has a bike box (not bag) that's suitable for air travel that they would like to sell,
    > >please contact me.
    >
    > Don't get excited - I don't have one to sell.
    >
    > But I do have an idea that somebody may wish to develop if it doesn't already exist: A bike box
    > which on arrival at the destination can be reasonably easily converted into a bike trailer. Retractable/Screw-
    > in axles, coupling system that detatches and fits around the internal perimeter of the box.
    > Somehow it would need to be able to contain not only the bike but also a pair of say 20" wheels.
    >
    > Buy me a pint when you're a millionaire...
    > --
    > I remember when the internet was only in black & white. It only had a few pages but at least they
    > all worked. Email: Put only the word "richard" before the @ sign.

    If I remember correctly Bike Friday already do one that you can pack their bike in and then convert
    to a luggage trailer. Several years ago I passed one. Now if airnimal did one they might find me
    buying their bike. Mike
     
  4. davebee

    davebee New Member

    Joined:
    Jan 15, 2004
    Messages:
    442
    Likes Received:
    0
    Forgive me if this is off topic, but what do people generally do with their bike box once they arrive at their destination? I want to go cycling in Italy at some point and would almost certainly fly, but where the heck would I store the box so that it was there when I got back. I would be touring around so taking the box with me would be a right arse. Could I store it at the airport or what?

    Ta
     
  5. Rik

    Rik Guest

    On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 22:55:00 GMT, davebee
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Forgive me if this is off topic, but what do people generally do with their bike box once they
    >arrive at their destination? I want to go cycling in Italy at some point and would almost
    >certainly fly, but where the heck would I store the box so that it was there when I got back. I
    >would be touring around so taking the box with me would be a right arse. Could I store it at the
    >airport or what?
    >
    >Ta

    My advice for what it's worth is don't bother with a box - at least for European destinations. I
    have travelled with Easyjet, BA and Scandinavian Airlines during the last 4 or 5 years and simply
    turn up at the check-in with the bike, turn the handlebars around and take off the peddles (which BA
    insisted I could not carry in my hand luggage). The bike is always hand delivered at the destination
    airport i.e. it doesn't get thrown on the carousel and, in my experience, is treated with much more
    respect than your average suitcase.

    I had a new bike with me last year which I protected by wrapping lightweight protection around the
    exposed bits of the frame. I used the underlay material which you get for use with laminate flooring
    and held it in place with insulating tape. It's only a couple of millimetres thick, very light and
    easy to store in the bottom of a pannier for the return trip. I also used a bit of bubble wrap
    around the brake and gear lever mechanisms.

    In all the years I've been doing this I have never yet been charged excess baggage although BA at
    Manchester Airport got a bit close to it last year when they asked me to put the bike on the
    weighing machine - you know, the conveyor belt thingy where you put your suitcases. I convinced them
    it was a lightweight bike by holding it in the air with one finger and they then realised that it
    wasn't worth the effort to manhandle it on to the conveyor belt so they just tagged it and sent me
    off to the outsize luggage check in place.

    Of the airlines I have used Easyjet was probably the most bike-friendly but in my experience they're
    all ok with bikes without boxes.

    Rik
     
  6. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "Rik" wrote...

    > On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 22:55:00 GMT, davebee wrote:
    >
    > >Forgive me if this is off topic, but what do people generally do with their bike box once they
    > >arrive at their destination? I want to go cycling in Italy at some point and would almost
    > >certainly fly, but where the heck would I store the box so that it was there when I got back. I
    > >would be touring around so taking the box with me would be a right arse. Could I store it at the
    > >airport or what?
    > >
    > >Ta
    >
    > My advice for what it's worth is don't bother with a box - at least for European destinations. I
    > have travelled with Easyjet, BA and Scandinavian Airlines during the last 4 or 5 years and simply
    > turn up at the check-in with the bike, turn the handlebars around and take off the peddles (which
    > BA insisted I could not carry in my hand luggage). The bike is always hand delivered at the
    > destination airport i.e. it doesn't get thrown on the carousel and, in my experience, is treated
    > with much more respect than your average suitcase.

    > Rik

    A few years back I used a bike box to get my bike to Pau, France (TGV trains require a bike be
    boxed/bagged). Since I was spending a night in the same hotel on arriving in Pau and before
    departing Pau after my cycle tour, the owner of the hotel let me store the bike box there at no
    charge for the ten days I was on tour. Many airports have luggage storage facilities, but expect to
    pay a fair bit.

    I'm going to be bringing a bike with me to the UK this May, and I'm debating whether to box the bike
    up or just roll it up to check in and turn the handlebars sideways and take the pedals off. I'm
    leaning towards not boxing the bike, but I would be grateful to hear from anyone who has travelled
    with a bike on BA recently. If it matters, I will be changing planes (and terminals) in Heathrow.
    --
    mark
     
  7. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "mikesbikes" <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > If I remember correctly Bike Friday already do one that you can pack their bike in and then
    > convert to a luggage trailer.

    I passed a couple of those on Mull earlier last year. They looked pretty impressive. However, I soon
    doubted their strength (bike and/or trailer) as the owners got off to go over a cattle grid,
    something which can usually be accomplished without difficulty on most bikes. Maybe they just had
    sensitive backsides? :)

    Graeme
     
  8. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Graeme" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I passed a couple of those on Mull earlier last year. They looked pretty impressive. However, I
    > soon doubted their strength (bike and/or trailer)
    as
    > the owners got off to go over a cattle grid, something which can usually
    be
    > accomplished without difficulty on most bikes. Maybe they just had sensitive backsides? :)

    Small wheels, high pressure tyres. Not a good combination on a cattle grid, trust me.

    --
    Guy
    ===

    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
     
  9. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]>typed

    > Small wheels, high pressure tyres. Not a good combination on a cattle grid, trust me.

    I did 'The Gridiron'[1] on my Brompton, with no ill effects...

    [1] 100km round the New Forest going over quite a few cattle grids.

    --
    Helen D. Vecht: [email protected] Edgware.
     
  10. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <outloo[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Small wheels, high pressure tyres. Not a good combination on a cattle grid, trust me.

    Sounds like the old joke about bike riding nuns and cobble stones. Depends on what turns you on I
    suppose :)

    Graeme
     
  11. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > > Small wheels, high pressure tyres. Not a good combination on a cattle
    grid,
    > > trust me.

    > I did 'The Gridiron'[1] on my Brompton, with no ill effects...

    Sure, and I've ridden my 'bent over cattle grids, and I can quite see why a Bike Friday user (with
    similar size wheels to mine, also at high pressure) would be wary. It doesn't imply anything other
    than that they are being cautious, in my view.

    --
    Guy
    ===

    WARNING: may contain traces of irony. Contents may settle after posting.
    http://www.chapmancentral.co.uk
     
  12. Tony Raven

    Tony Raven Guest

    Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    >
    >>> Small wheels, high pressure tyres. Not a good combination on a cattle
    > grid,
    >>> trust me.
    >
    >> I did 'The Gridiron'[1] on my Brompton, with no ill effects...
    >
    >
    > Sure, and I've ridden my 'bent over cattle grids, and I can quite see why a Bike Friday user (with
    > similar size wheels to mine, also at high pressure) would be wary. It doesn't imply anything other
    > than that they are being cautious, in my view.

    I've ridden my Bike Friday over cattle grids and not had any problems. The faster the better IMHO
    because it tends to smooth out the vibrations.

    Tony
     
  13. Johnb

    Johnb Guest

    Tony Raven wrote:
    >
    > Just zis Guy, you know? wrote:
    > > "Helen Deborah Vecht" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > > news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > >>> Small wheels, high pressure tyres. Not a good combination on a cattle
    > > grid,
    > >>> trust me.
    > >
    > >> I did 'The Gridiron'[1] on my Brompton, with no ill effects...
    > >
    > >
    > > Sure, and I've ridden my 'bent over cattle grids, and I can quite see why a Bike Friday user
    > > (with similar size wheels to mine, also at high pressure) would be wary. It doesn't imply
    > > anything other than that they are being cautious, in my view.
    >
    > I've ridden my Bike Friday over cattle grids and not had any problems. The faster the better IMHO
    > because it tends to smooth out the vibrations.

    Ditto, but the case trailer has plastic wheels which rattle and bounce a lot and without much weight
    inside (the bike is now pulling the trailer) i'd guess it could be a bit disconcerting.

    John B
     
  14. John Redman

    John Redman Guest

    Easyjet now charge £20 each way for an unboxed bike.

    JR

    "Rik" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 22:55:00 GMT, davebee <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Forgive me if this is off topic, but what do people generally do with their bike box once they
    > >arrive at their destination? I want to go cycling in Italy at some point and would almost
    > >certainly fly, but where the heck would I store the box so that it was there when I got back. I
    > >would be touring around so taking the box with me would be a right arse. Could I store it at the
    > >airport or what?
    > >
    > >Ta
    >
    > My advice for what it's worth is don't bother with a box - at least for European destinations. I
    > have travelled with Easyjet, BA and Scandinavian Airlines during the last 4 or 5 years and simply
    > turn up at the check-in with the bike, turn the handlebars around and take off the peddles (which
    > BA insisted I could not carry in my hand luggage). The bike is always hand delivered at the
    > destination airport i.e. it doesn't get thrown on the carousel and, in my experience, is treated
    > with much more respect than your average suitcase.
    >
    > I had a new bike with me last year which I protected by wrapping lightweight protection around the
    > exposed bits of the frame. I used the underlay material which you get for use with laminate
    > flooring and held it in place with insulating tape. It's only a couple of millimetres thick, very
    > light and easy to store in the bottom of a pannier for the return trip. I also used a bit of
    > bubble wrap around the brake and gear lever mechanisms.
    >
    > In all the years I've been doing this I have never yet been charged excess baggage although BA at
    > Manchester Airport got a bit close to it last year when they asked me to put the bike on the
    > weighing machine - you know, the conveyor belt thingy where you put your suitcases. I convinced
    > them it was a lightweight bike by holding it in the air with one finger and they then realised
    > that it wasn't worth the effort to manhandle it on to the conveyor belt so they just tagged it and
    > sent me off to the outsize luggage check in place.
    >
    > Of the airlines I have used Easyjet was probably the most bike-friendly but in my experience
    > they're all ok with bikes without boxes.
    >
    > Rik
     
  15. Msa

    Msa Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    >
    > "Rik" wrote...
    >
    > > On Sun, 01 Feb 2004 22:55:00 GMT, davebee wrote:
    > >
    > > >Forgive me if this is off topic, but what do people generally do with their bike box once they
    > > >arrive at their destination? I want to go cycling in Italy at some point and would almost
    > > >certainly fly, but where the heck would I store the box so that it was there when I got back. I
    > > >would be touring around so taking the box with me would be a right arse. Could I store it at
    > > >the airport or what?
    > > >
    > > >Ta
    > >
    > > My advice for what it's worth is don't bother with a box - at least for European destinations. I
    > > have travelled with Easyjet, BA and Scandinavian Airlines during the last 4 or 5 years and
    > > simply turn up at the check-in with the bike, turn the handlebars around and take off the
    > > peddles (which BA insisted I could not carry in my hand luggage). The bike is always hand
    > > delivered at the destination airport i.e. it doesn't get thrown on the carousel and, in my
    > > experience, is treated with much more respect than your average suitcase.
    >
    > > Rik
    >
    > A few years back I used a bike box to get my bike to Pau, France (TGV trains require a bike be
    > boxed/bagged). Since I was spending a night in the same hotel on arriving in Pau and before
    > departing Pau after my cycle tour, the owner of the hotel let me store the bike box there at no
    > charge for the ten days I was on tour. Many airports have luggage storage facilities, but expect
    > to pay a fair bit.
    >
    > I'm going to be bringing a bike with me to the UK this May, and I'm debating whether to box the
    > bike up or just roll it up to check in and turn the handlebars sideways and take the pedals off.
    > I'm leaning towards not boxing the bike, but I would be grateful to hear from anyone who has
    > travelled with a bike on BA recently. If it matters, I will be changing planes (and terminals) in
    > Heathrow.
    > --
    > mark
    > >
    > >
    >
    >
    >

    Yes, I have used this method before but an not willing to take a risk this time (not that I had bad
    experiences before). I'm racing in Spain in April and will be transporting my race bike which I'm
    too embarrassed to type what it cost! I really couldn't bring myself to wrap it up and hand it over,
    it's GOT to go in a box. Storage of the box at the other end is not an issue, I have transfers to
    the hotel where the box will be stored until the day of return.

    --
    Mark (MSA) This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not volume. Some settling of contents may
    have occurred during transmission
     
  16. Mark

    Mark Guest

    "MSA" > wrote <snip> I'm racing in Spain
    > in April and will be transporting my race bike which I'm too embarrassed to type what it cost!
    <snip>

    > Mark (MSA)

    Embarassed? You should be proud! I for one am pleased to report that the resale value of my car is
    less than the purchase price of either of my "good" bikes.

    The PSF spoke well when she said "One can never own too many bikes or spend too much money
    on bikes".
    --
    mark
     
  17. Msa

    Msa Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Embarassed? You should be proud! I for one am pleased to report that the resale value of my car is
    > less than the purchase price of either of my "good" bikes.
    >

    Snap! And it ain't a bad car either :)

    --
    Mark (MSA) This post is packaged by intellectual weight, not volume. Some settling of contents may
    have occurred during transmission
     
  18. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Tue, 03 Feb 2004 00:42:13 GMT, "mark" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >Embarassed? You should be proud! I for one am pleased to report that the resale value of my car is
    >less than the purchase price of either of my "good" bikes.

    Snap. Three of my bikes are each worth more than the car.

    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk
     
Loading...
Thread Status:
Not open for further replies.
Loading...