Wanted : Casserole-like suggestions for a potluck

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Alex Rast, Feb 9, 2006.

  1. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    the following criteria:

    - Relatively cheap
    - No labour-intensive steps
    - Does not use wine
    - Does not use vinegar
    - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    - Is good cold as well as hot
    - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    - Is not a salad-like item

    I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    matching these criteria would also be fine.

    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
    Tags:


  2. On Fri, 10 Feb 2006 01:15:43 -0000, [email protected]
    (Alex Rast) wrote:

    >I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    >the following criteria:
    >
    >- Relatively cheap
    >- No labour-intensive steps
    >- Does not use wine
    >- Does not use vinegar
    >- Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    >- Is good cold as well as hot
    >- Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    >- Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    >- Is not a salad-like item
    >
    >I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    >probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    >matching these criteria would also be fine.


    Meatloaf. ;)

    Christine
     
  3. Alex wrote:

    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.


    Baked ziti is the best I can come up with at the moment.

    One thing to consider, though: cold cooked ground beef is kinda nasty, so
    your sixth and seventh criteria are almost mutually exclusive.

    Bob
     
  4. Mark Thorson

    Mark Thorson Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    >
    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck,
    > meeting the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps


    This hardly sounds like the Alex who normally posts here.
    Do you hate these people, or something? :)
     
  5. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.
    >



    Here's what I'm making for a potluck this weekend. It meets over half
    of your requirements. I'll probably spring for lean ground beef instead
    of using ground turkey this time. I will make it a day ahead, leave it
    in the pyrex pan, and take it in the Nesco roaster so it can be heating
    up during church even if there's no room in one of the ovens.

    Mexican Lasagna Hotdish!

    1 package (about 20) fresh corn tortillas
    1 (1 pound) pkg ground turkey, thawed [or ground beef, 85% lean]
    1 cup (approx) nacho or cheddar cheese sauce [from a humongous can]
    1 large (19 to 23 ounce) can enchilada sauce, or 2 small cans
    1 (16 ounce) can low-fat refried beans [I used fat-free Taco Bell brand]
    1/2 large yellow onion, chopped
    1 Tbsp ground New Mexico chile pepper ["chimayo" chile is good]
    1/2 tsp ground cumin
    1/2 dried whole-leaf oregano, or a big pinch of ground oregano
    garlic powder to taste
    Monterrey jack or medium cheddar cheese, grated

    Mix ground meat, onion, and spices in skillet. Cook until browned,
    chopping up with your spatula. Stir in the cheese sauce and heat
    through. Set aside.

    Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Pour half the enchilada sauce in a 9x13"
    lightly greased lasagne pan. Cut a bunch of the tortillas in half so
    they'll fit in the pan better. Spread the beans on enough of the
    tortillas to cover the bottom of the pan. Cover with another layer of
    tortillas. Spread the meat mixture over that second layer of tortillas.
    Cover with a third layer of tortillas. Pour the remaining enchilada
    sauce all over. Rinse the can with a little water and pour that in too.
    Cover with aluminum foil and bake for 30 minutes. Take out of oven,
    remove the foil, and sprinkle the top with that grated cheese that you
    thought I forgot about. Put back in the oven, uncovered, for ten
    minutes. Allow to rest for 5 minutes before cutting.

    Best regards,
    Bob
     
  6. aem

    aem Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    > [snip]
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.
    >

    I think I can meet all these criteria except the one about being good
    cold. Shall I go on, or is that a deal breaker? (I've got another
    one in mind that is good at room temp but it's not a casserole.)
    -aem
     
  7. [email protected] (Alex Rast) hitched up their panties and
    posted news:[email protected]:

    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck,
    > meeting the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and
    > most probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a
    > potluck matching these criteria would also be fine.
    >


    Tuna noddle hot dish maybe? I'm at a loss here. I think anything with pasta
    would be okay.

    Michael

    --
    “It requires a certain kind of mind to see beauty in a hamburger bun.”
    _Ray Kroc, creator of the McDonald's franchise
     
  8. Jessica V.

    Jessica V. Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.
    >
    > --
    > Alex Rast
    > [email protected]
    > (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)


    Skillet Beef & Noodle
    1 medium onion chopped
    1-2 cloves garlic minced
    1 lb ground beef
    1 package (can't remember if the are 16 or 12 ounces) broad egg noodles
    cooked and drained
    1 28 ounce can diced tomatoes
    1 pound green beans fresh or frozen
    1/2 t. thyme
    salt & pepper to taste

    Brown beef with onion and garlic, drain grease. Add tomatoes, beans
    and thyme to skillet with drained ground beef, simmer until beans are
    done, stir in noodles, s&p to taste.

    Usually made in an electric skillet, usually served at family reunions.
    Thinking this might not be great chilled, but it is IMO good less than
    piping hot.

    Jessica
     
  9. "Alex Rast" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.
    >
    > --
    > Alex Rast


    Skip the ground beef. Any dish using ground beef is going to have a funny
    mouth feel when cold due to tiny congealed fat spots. How about a nice
    baked bean dish and butter bread or rolls. Makes a nice sandwich when cold.
    Janet
     
  10. Leila

    Leila Guest

  11. Leila

    Leila Guest

    Woops - the kibbeh recipe quoted above is the deep-fried version. I
    call deep-fried anything labor intensive. Here's my version, baked in a
    shallow dish:

    http://groups.google.com/group/rec....bc0f3?q=kibbeh+recipe&rnum=7#3e1788cd8d1bc0f3

    At a Lebanese party you might see kibbeh served THREE ways - raw (yes,
    raw), fried in balls or football shapes, and baked in a tray and cut
    into diamonds or rectangles. The baked version is considered more
    "homestyle" but I like it because it's healthier and less trouble.

    Leila
     
  12. ntantiques

    ntantiques Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.
    >
    > --
    > Alex Rast


    Best I can come up with given your long lost of limitations would be a
    big bag or two of frozen pre-cooked shrimp from the supermarket. Have
    fallen back on this for potlucks more than once when I've been pressed
    for time. Just thaw 'em, grab a nice platter out of the cabinet, pile
    the shrimp on a bed of something green(kale's good) with a dish of good
    cocktail sauce and some lemon wedges. They're easy to transport and
    there are never any left.

    Nancy T
     
  13. Steve Pope

    Steve Pope Guest

    Leila <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Kibbeh.


    Why not Milookhia. Much faster results on who's in and who's not.

    Steve
     
  14. Alex Rast

    Alex Rast Guest

    at Fri, 10 Feb 2006 01:34:04 GMT in
    <[email protected]>, [email protected]_spammer.biz (Bob
    Terwilliger) wrote :

    >Alex wrote:
    >
    >> I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck,
    >> meeting the following criteria:
    >>

    >Baked ziti is the best I can come up with at the moment.
    >
    >One thing to consider, though: cold cooked ground beef is kinda nasty,
    >so your sixth and seventh criteria are almost mutually exclusive.

    ....

    IME there are situations where, yes, cold cooked ground beef is bad. But in
    other situations it can work. Meat pie is one. Meatballs are another. (I
    did like the meatloaf idea but ground pork + ground veal could bump the
    price up significantly. I will consider)

    Why cold preferred? Here's the background. It's for an event that will be
    held about midday. However, at this event there will be other activities
    happening from morning until then. We're talking minimum of 2-2 1/2 hours.
    It's not practical to make the item in the morning because of the early
    start. So it will have to be made the night before. Meanwhile, the place
    does have facilities wherein something could be heated, but it would have
    to sit, unmonitored, for 2 or more hours, and furthermore others might have
    planned on using that (oven, range) anyway and be bringing something which
    really *can't* be served cold.

    I'd like to use ground beef because then it can be a meat-containing dish
    rather than something vegetarian. But it isn't mandatory, just a preferred.
    I don't want to use something standard like salami because you know a lot
    of other people will bring that.

    at Fri, 10 Feb 2006 01:38:19 GMT in <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Mark Thorson) wrote :

    >> - Relatively cheap
    >> - No labour-intensive steps


    >This hardly sounds like the Alex who normally posts here.
    >Do you hate these people, or something? :)


    Not at all. As you know I'm definitely one to go for quality. But quality
    and high price aren't necessarily synonymous. Carrots, for example, even
    for the best quality imaginable, don't break the bank. Neither do most
    grains (with a few notable exceptions, especially in the rice department).
    In a similar vein, I definitely go for made-from-scratch as opposed to
    store-bought. But made from scratch and labour intensive are similarly not
    synonymous. Stew, for example, takes for many varieties minimal effort - it
    can be in some cases as simple as dump in pot, add liquid, put on low heat,
    wait and serve. The reason in this case it should be relatively cheap and
    not labour intensive is because it needs to serve a lot of people, and when
    you scale up, expensive and/or labour-intensive things quickly get out of
    hand.

    I love the kibbeh idea except that ground lamb is relatively expensive.
    Otherwise that'd have been a done deal. In fact, it's a bit of a bummer on
    the price of lamb, because I know a great many Middle Eastern dishes that
    would have been ideal but for their use of lamb rather than beef.

    --
    Alex Rast
    [email protected]
    (remove d., .7, not, and .NOSPAM to reply)
     
  15. In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Alex Rast) wrote:

    > I'm looking for suggestions for something to bring to a potluck, meeting
    > the following criteria:
    >
    > - Relatively cheap
    > - No labour-intensive steps
    > - Does not use wine
    > - Does not use vinegar
    > - Does not use pre-prepared ingredients (box mixes, canned soups, etc)
    > - Is good cold as well as hot
    > - Preferably, uses ground beef as an ingredient
    > - Preferably, has no dairy, and certainly has no cheese
    > - Is not a salad-like item
    >
    > I said "casserole-like" in the intro because that seems practical and most
    > probable, but anything else that could easily be brought to a potluck
    > matching these criteria would also be fine.


    Leave out the cheese, add some marinated artichoke hearts.
    You gotta have beef, Alex? Get some beef sticks and cut them in 1/2
    inch pieces and mix in. "-)


    * Exported from MasterCook Mac *

    Tomato-Garlic Angel Hair

    Recipe By : Posted to rec.food.cooking by Barb Schaller 2/10/2006
    Serving Size : 8 Preparation Time :0:00
    Categories : Entrees

    Amount Measure Ingredient -- Preparation Method
    -------- ------------ --------------------------------
    1 pound angel hair pasta
    3 large ripe tomatoes, peeled, seeded, and chopped
    1/3 cup olive oil
    1/4 cup grated parmesan cheese
    1/4 cup minced fresh parsley
    2 cloves garlic -- minced
    1 tablespoon minced fresh basil
    1/4 teaspoon garlic salt

    Cook pasta according to package directions. Meanwhile, combine
    remaining ingredients in a large bowl. Rinse and drain pasta; add to
    tomato mixture and toss to coat. Serve immediately.
    - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
    NOTES : Recipe from Salvatore Bertolino, Indiana, PA.Taste of Home,
    June/July, 1999; Men Who Run The Range

    _____
    --
    http://www.jamlady.eboard.com, updated 2-4-2006, Masa
     
  16. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Alex Rast wrote:
    > IME there are situations where, yes, cold cooked ground beef is bad. But in
    > other situations it can work. Meat pie is one. Meatballs are another. (I
    > did like the meatloaf idea but ground pork + ground veal could bump the
    > price up significantly. I will consider)


    Try substituting ground turkey for the veal. That bumps the price of
    the mixture right back down.

    Bob
     
  17. kilikini

    kilikini Guest

    "zxcvbob" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Alex Rast wrote:
    > > IME there are situations where, yes, cold cooked ground beef is bad. But

    in
    > > other situations it can work. Meat pie is one. Meatballs are another. (I
    > > did like the meatloaf idea but ground pork + ground veal could bump the
    > > price up significantly. I will consider)

    >
    > Try substituting ground turkey for the veal. That bumps the price of
    > the mixture right back down.
    >
    > Bob


    IMO, ground turkey has no flavor. I can't stand the stuff. Ground pork
    isn't *that* expensive. Veal, OTOH.........nah. So far, I think the ziti
    thing is the best suggestion, or any kind of cold spaghetti. There are
    recipes for cold spaghetti. Heck, it would be simple!

    kili
     
  18. Jude

    Jude Guest

    How about you makesome dolmas....stuffed grape leaves? They can be
    filled with meat in some and rice i others. Cheap. Good at room temp.
    Filling. Different. Serve them on a platter with pita and feta cheese.
    (They can be served warm with avegelemono sauce but cold wold be fine
    for a potluck)
     
  19. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    Leila wrote:
    > Woops - the kibbeh recipe quoted above is the deep-fried version. I
    > call deep-fried anything labor intensive. Here's my version, baked in a
    > shallow dish:
    >
    > http://groups.google.com/group/rec....bc0f3?q=kibbeh+recipe&rnum=7#3e1788cd8d1bc0f3
    >
    > At a Lebanese party you might see kibbeh served THREE ways - raw (yes,
    > raw), fried in balls or football shapes, and baked in a tray and cut
    > into diamonds or rectangles. The baked version is considered more
    > "homestyle" but I like it because it's healthier and less trouble.
    >
    > Leila
    >


    I've just saved off your recipe and instructions for future reference.

    My meat grinder came with a kibbeh attachment, I've never figured out
    how to use it. It looks like it would extrude a meat/bulgur paste tube
    that you would cut into lengths and fill with a spiced meatball mix and
    seal the ends.

    In your recipe, do you cut all the way thru the layers before baking, or
    just mark the top layer? When do you cut them, after they cool? Are
    they served in the baking pan? Doesn't the bottom get soggy?

    Thanks,
    Bob
     
  20. zxcvbob

    zxcvbob Guest

    zxcvbob wrote:
    > Leila wrote:
    >
    >> Woops - the kibbeh recipe quoted above is the deep-fried version. I
    >> call deep-fried anything labor intensive. Here's my version, baked in a
    >> shallow dish:
    >>
    >> http://groups.google.com/group/rec....bc0f3?q=kibbeh+recipe&rnum=7#3e1788cd8d1bc0f3
    >>
    >>
    >> At a Lebanese party you might see kibbeh served THREE ways - raw (yes,
    >> raw), fried in balls or football shapes, and baked in a tray and cut
    >> into diamonds or rectangles. The baked version is considered more
    >> "homestyle" but I like it because it's healthier and less trouble.
    >>
    >> Leila
    >>

    >
    > I've just saved off your recipe and instructions for future reference.
    >
    > My meat grinder came with a kibbeh attachment, I've never figured out
    > how to use it. It looks like it would extrude a meat/bulgur paste tube
    > that you would cut into lengths and fill with a spiced meatball mix and
    > seal the ends.
    >
    > In your recipe, do you cut all the way thru the layers before baking, or
    > just mark the top layer? When do you cut them, after they cool? Are
    > they served in the baking pan? Doesn't the bottom get soggy?
    >
    > Thanks,
    > Bob



    I forgot to mention, I'm thinking of trying this with turkey for the
    shell, and lamb and pistachios for the filling. Or should the lamb go
    on the outside? I have both lamb and turkey in the freezer already, but
    just one pound of lamb and not sure where to buy more.

    Bob
     
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