Wanted: Chicken and Noodles



E

E Jones

Guest
I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in a
stock pot on top of the stove.

I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.

Any help here?

Thanks.

- ESJ
 
N

Nancy1

Guest
E Jones wrote:
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
>
> Any help here?
>
> Thanks.
>
> - ESJ


You can certainly do a "casserole" on top the stove. Just cook the
noodles in one pot; make a thick white sauce with either flour or corn
starch and use chicken broth for the liquid. Combine the cooked
noodles, the finished white sauce, diced chicken, and onion, parsley,
salt, pepper, pimiento, celery, mushrooms, almonds - whatever else you
want in it - leave on low heat until hot all the way through, stirring
frequently. I don't get the difference between this and a baked
casserole, other than the stove-top thing won't have crumbs on top.

N.
 
A

aem

Guest
E Jones wrote:
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.


I was with you until the last phrase. When I think of chicken and
noodles, it's the creamy chicken over noodles. No biscuits or potatoes
needed. At any rate, here is a rich chicken fricassee you might try.
-aem

Chicken Fricassee

4 TB Olive oil
2 lbs Boneless chicken, white or dark meat, cut up
1/4 lb Unsalted butter
2 Yellow onions, chopped
8 oz. Mushrooms, white or crimini, sliced 1/4" thick or quartered
3 Cups Heavy cream
3 Egg yolks
pinch Freshly grated nutmeg
1 Cup Frozen peas, thawed

1 lb Fresh egg fettuccine, cooked
Freshly grated Parmesan cheese, optional
Fresh parsley, chopped, optional

Optional additions: chopped red bell pepper; pinch of sage or poultry
seasoning.
Optional method: substitute white sauce for cream and egg yolks, but
it won't be as rich.

Method:

Heat the oil in a large skillet. Season the chicken with salt and
pepper and brown it quickly over high heat, then reduce to medium. When
the chicken is nearly cooked through, remove it to drain on layers of
paper toweling. Discard the oil.

Melt the butter in the skillet, cook onions until they are translucent,
about 5 minutes. Add the mushrooms and cook 2 - 4 minutes longer,
scraping up any browned bits in the skillet.

Return the chicken to the skillet. Whisk the cream into the egg yolks
and add a pinch of nutmeg. Stir the cream mixture into the skillet,
lower the heat, and simmer for 4 to 6 minutes, until thickened. Add
the peas and heat the fricassee thoroughly.

Correct seasonings to taste and serve with cooked fettuccine, garnished
with parsley. Pass freshly grated Parmesan cheese separately.
 
E Jones wrote:
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.


I specialize in my own version of this!

Make a roux with about 3-4 tbs butter and 3-4 tbs flour. Mix in a can
of chicken broth. Add a level tablespoon of chicken boullion, a touch
of black pepper. Mix in diced cooked chicken breast.

Cook pasta separately and combine at the end. I prefer "radiatore"
because it holds the sauce better! Great on toast, smashed potatoes,
all kinds of things.
 
Make a roux with 3-4 tbs butter, 3-4 tbs flour. Add I can chicken
broth, I level tablespoon chicken boullion, pepper to taste. Add cooked
chicken slices.

Combine with cooked pasta. I prefer radiatore. because it holds the
sauce better.
 
M

ms_peacock

Guest
"E Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in
> a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
>
> Any help here?
>
> Thanks.
>
> - ESJ


That's what I'm making for supper today. I can't make noodles to save my
soul though so I use the Reames frozen noodles. They are as good as the
noodles my ex-mil made.

I cook the chicken with a chopped up onion, parsley flakes, and celery
flakes until it's falling off the bone. Take the chicken out and debone.
Add the meat and just a wee bit of the skin smooshed up back to the broth
and add the noodles and salt and pepper to taste. In spite of what it says
on the package they take about an hour and a half to cook right. That's all
you need, well, except for the mashed potatoes, and a fresh dinner roll and
some peas. Back when we were poor I used wings. Now that wings are more
than just about any other part I use thighs. The best is if you can get an
old hen that isn't laying anymore.

Ms P
 
S

S'mee

Guest
One time on Usenet, "E Jones" <[email protected]> said:

> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.


Hmm, kind of, but the "creamy" part isn't quite right. My father
learned this from my grandma -- he simmers a whole chicken in a big
pot (not sure how much water he uses), removes the chicken when done,
puts it on a baking sheet, seasons with S&P and puts it in the oven
to keep it warm. Meantime, he thickens the remaining broth with
corn starch, and cooks egg noodles. He takes the meat off the bird,
puts that and the noodles into the gravy, and serves it over mashed
potatoes.

Dang, I have to hit him up for dinner soon...


--
Jani in WA (S'mee)
~ mom, Trollop, novice cook ~
 
J

jmcquown

Guest
E Jones wrote:
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles,
> cooked in a stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish
> I am looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg
> noodles, to serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
>
> Any help here?
>
> Thanks.
>
> - ESJ


Not a difficult thing. Definitely not served over biscuits or mashed
potatoes. Just this:

Egg noodles cooked in chicken broth. Add to this mix with a couple of
chicken breasts torn into strips, or thighs simmered and de-boned. Add some
frozen diced potatoes, carrots, green beans and peas. Cook and simmer over
low heat until tender. Add lots of pepper and some dried sage. Heat it all
together and add to the noodles with the broth and add some red pepper
flakes.

Jill
 
C

Charles Gifford

Guest
"E Jones" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in

a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
>
> Any help here?
>
> Thanks.
>
> - ESJ


This is pretty old fashioned chicken and noodles. It is the recipe I use and
I am old fashioned.

Charlie

CHICKEN AND NOODLES

Source: unknown due to the mists of time

1 egg, slightly beaten
1 tbs. water
salt (about 1/2 tsp.)
flour

1 chicken, cut up
water
1 onion, peeled and sliced
5 new potatoes, or 2 potatoes, cut in eighths
salt
pepper
1/2 cup fresh or frozen green peas

Make noodles or use 1 pkg. wide noodles: Mix egg, salt and water in bowl.
Add flour until it forms a ball. Put on floured board and pat out in thin.
Put flour on top and push in with fingers until no more will go in. Turn
over and do the same. Keep pushing flour into the dough until it is very
dry. Roll thin, about 1/16-inch and then roll up like a jelly roll. Cut
noodles with a sharp knife about 1/4-inch wide. Unroll and let dry on a flat
surface. In damp weather, put on cookie sheet in oven with pilot light on.

Place the chicken in stew pot with enough water to cover. Add onion and boil
chicken about an hour, until chicken falls off bone. Remove chicken and
bones. Remove all chicken from the bones and skin. Cut chicken meat into
large pieces. Skim fat from liquid, add potatoes and boil for 15 minutes.
Add chicken meat, salt and pepper to taste. Add peas and noodles. Boil until
done.

Note: If using packaged noodles, give the noodles a little head start over
the peas. you can also add a slurry of 1 tbs. flour and water to thicken
liquid. Not needed if using hand made noodles.
 
P

PastaLover

Guest
E Jones wrote:
> I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles, cooked in a
> stock pot on top of the stove.
>
> I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the dish I am
> looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and egg noodles, to
> serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
>
> Any help here?
>
> Thanks.
>
> - ESJ
>
>


I'll do my best...

First, a little editorial: Most of the other recipes, while no doubt
good, all sort of seem to cut corners a bit. Just my opinion.

Next, a little context: This is the way my material grandmother made
chicken and noodles. My mother never got the hang of it, but I think I
did. Cannot ever be as good as my grandmother, but I try.

This is one of several dinners that were always a staple Sunday dinner.
My grandparents were both born in the 1910's, and raised two kids on a
small farm in the middle of the Depression. Out of necessity, they had
to make do with what they could.

And also keep in mind, this is a high fat, high carbs dinner. Something
people who did hard physical labor and needed something to stick to
their ribs in tough times.

First up: Noodles.

Dead simple, but hard to get the knack of. Eggs, a little salt, and
general purpose flour. That's it. The simple part. Now the hard part.
You mix the flour and eggs and salt together in a bowl. Some people just
sift the flour out on a clean table, and make a little bowl right out
of the flour. Mix the goo together with a fork, incorporating a little
flour at a time until you get just the right consistancy. Now, you start
in with the hands, kneading the dough until it has a certain elasticity.
When you get it just right--and it's hard to describe, but with
experience you'll know it--dust the remaining flour on the table and
roll out the dough.

It's a matter of taste how thick or thin you roll the dough. But don't
make them too thin; they'll disintergrate while cooking and turn to mush.

When the dough is rolled out to your liking, let them dry. This can take
awhile if it's humid or cool. But they should be dry enough to be
brittle at the edges.

Then, cut with a sharp knife into sheets about 4 inches wide and as long
as the sheet. Stack the sheets, and then cut into ribbons. Again:
Personal taste as to how narrow you cut them. One grandmother made her's
thick and narrow, almost like a fat Japanese noodle, the other made them
a little thinner and not as narrow.

When cut, shake off the excess flour and set aside for cooking.

Next, the chicken. Also, dead simple, but hard to do. They don't make
chickens as fat as they used to. There used to be something called a
"stewing hen"; an older fatter chicken. On the farm, you used an old hen
that just wasn't laying eggs well anymore. The older and fatter, the
more flavor.

Today, all you can find in a store is something called a "fryer";
skinny, and mostly tasteless. If you're not lucky enough to own your own
chickens, or live near an old-fashioned farm, look in the Kosher section
of the frozen foods section and look for some chicken fat (rendered or not).

Clean the chicken and then in a large stock pot, boil the hell out of
the chicken until it falls off the bone. You can season the water with
salt, of course, or add veggies, but my grandmother never did. When
done, take off the heat and remove the chicken to a platter for later
serving. Depending upon taste, strain the little chicken bits out of the
water (or not).

Put the pot back on the stove and bring it to a rolling boil. Slowly add
the dried noodles. Stir a bit to make sure they don't stick together. No
need for a roux or thicken with corn starch. The flour stuck to the
noodles will serve as the thickener. Now, some people will think this
makes the resulting "gravy" too "starchy" or "paste-y." I think it does
too, if the chicken isn't flavorful enough or you don't cook the noodles
long enough. And with enough chicken fat, you get some thickening from
the fat and flour cooking together (a ready-made really blonde roux).

It's another "experiences teaches all" thing on exactly how many noodles
to use. Some people like more noodles, less gravy, others the reverse
(I'm a more gravy sort of guy myself).

Serve the noodles over mashed potatoes (make a "volcano" with a fork
first and drop in a big pat of butter first!), or over freshly baked
home-made biscuits, or over toast or even just a big thick slice of
freshly baked home-made bread. Serve the chicken on the side.

Yes, I've seen that some have said that over mashed potatoes isn't the
right way. But it's what my grandmother did, so in my book, it's the
right way.

Leftovers are great. This is usually when we didn't have any potatoes
left, and used toast or bread instead.

As a busy adult without the room or time to roll out the noodles myself,
I've tried to make something similar with dried store-bought "plastic"
noodles. You know the ones, in the clear cellophane bags. It's not the
same. And I've even tried doing a roux, a cream sauce, or packaged
chicken gravy (Knorr is a great mix). But again, not quite the same as I
remember. I'm not sure if it's just a faulty memory as I get older, but
a big part of me honestly believes that it's because it's just not
Grandma's recipe.

Enjoy!
 
M

ms_peacock

Guest
"PastaLover" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> As a busy adult without the room or time to roll out the noodles myself,
> I've tried to make something similar with dried store-bought "plastic"
> noodles. You know the ones, in the clear cellophane bags. It's not the
> same. And I've even tried doing a roux, a cream sauce, or packaged chicken
> gravy (Knorr is a great mix). But again, not quite the same as I remember.
> I'm not sure if it's just a faulty memory as I get older, but a big part
> of me honestly believes that it's because it's just not Grandma's recipe.
>
> Enjoy!


Try the frozen noodles when you're pressed for time or space. I tried and
tried to make noodles and never could get the damn things right and then I
discovered the frozen ones. They're close enough to suit me. The dried
things are just not even close to the right thing.

Ms P
 
M

Mr Libido Incognito

Guest
jmcquown wrote on 07 Dec 2005 in rec.food.cooking

> E Jones wrote:
> > I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles,
> > cooked in a stock pot on top of the stove.
> >
> > I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> > chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the
> > dish I am looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and
> > egg noodles, to serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
> >
> > Any help here?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > - ESJ

>
> Not a difficult thing. Definitely not served over biscuits or mashed
> potatoes. Just this:
>
> Egg noodles cooked in chicken broth. Add to this mix with a couple of
> chicken breasts torn into strips, or thighs simmered and de-boned.
> Add some frozen diced potatoes, carrots, green beans and peas. Cook
> and simmer over low heat until tender. Add lots of pepper and some
> dried sage. Heat it all together and add to the noodles with the
> broth and add some red pepper flakes.
>
> Jill
>
>


There is a chicken pot pie type dealie made by Mennonites that is done on
top of the stove...with noodles instead of pastry. While I have eaten it I
haven't a tried and true recipe...

I googled this up using Mennonite Chicken Pot Pie...it wasn't the only hit
(by far).

http://www.aliciasrecipes.com/potato-recipes/mennonite-pot-pie-recipe.htm

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
 
M

Mr Libido Incognito

Guest
jmcquown wrote on 07 Dec 2005 in rec.food.cooking

> E Jones wrote:
> > I'm looking for a recipe for old-fashioned chicken and noodles,
> > cooked in a stock pot on top of the stove.
> >
> > I've searched the web, and found chicken-noodle casseroles (baked),
> > chicken-noodle soup, some crock pot recipes, but nothing for the
> > dish I am looking for, a thick, creamy base with cooked chicken and
> > egg noodles, to serve with/over hot biscuits and/or mashed potatoes.
> >
> > Any help here?
> >
> > Thanks.
> >
> > - ESJ

>
> Not a difficult thing. Definitely not served over biscuits or mashed
> potatoes. Just this:
>
> Egg noodles cooked in chicken broth. Add to this mix with a couple of
> chicken breasts torn into strips, or thighs simmered and de-boned.
> Add some frozen diced potatoes, carrots, green beans and peas. Cook
> and simmer over low heat until tender. Add lots of pepper and some
> dried sage. Heat it all together and add to the noodles with the
> broth and add some red pepper flakes.
>
> Jill
>
>


There is a chicken pot pie type dealie made by Mennonites that is done on
top of the stove...with noodles instead of pastry. While I have eaten it I
haven't a tried and true recipe...

I googled this up using Mennonite Chicken Pot Pie...it wasn't the only hit
(by far).

http://www.aliciasrecipes.com/potato-recipes/mennonite-pot-pie-recipe.htm

--
The eyes are the mirrors....
But the ears...Ah the ears.
The ears keep the hat up.
 
P

PastaLover

Guest
ms_peacock wrote:
> "PastaLover" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
>
>>As a busy adult without the room or time to roll out the noodles myself,
>>I've tried to make something similar with dried store-bought "plastic"
>>noodles. You know the ones, in the clear cellophane bags. It's not the
>>same. And I've even tried doing a roux, a cream sauce, or packaged chicken
>>gravy (Knorr is a great mix). But again, not quite the same as I remember.
>>I'm not sure if it's just a faulty memory as I get older, but a big part
>>of me honestly believes that it's because it's just not Grandma's recipe.
>>
>>Enjoy!

>
>
> Try the frozen noodles when you're pressed for time or space. I tried and
> tried to make noodles and never could get the damn things right and then I
> discovered the frozen ones. They're close enough to suit me. The dried
> things are just not even close to the right thing.
>
> Ms P
>
>


I have tried the frozen ones. I just didn't mention it in the original
response (it was long enough...). Not every grocery store carries them.

Yes, they are better than the dried ones, but still not quite the same
as *my* Grandma's. (In fact, I think one brand of the frozen ones are
called "Grandma's".)

I only resort to the dried or frozen ones when necessary. I try to make
a real batch of the homemade ones every couple months to keep the skills
sharp. But that doesn't always happen. Too much travel and too many
hours work...