Wanted: Ideas for a hilll training plan

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Roger 2k, Sep 15, 2003.

  1. Roger 2k

    Roger 2k Guest

    A few of you already know I've been training for a 1/4 mile sprint up a fairly good sized hill.

    I've been doing a few of the leg exercises from the book "Explosive Running" by Michael Yessis, and
    they seem to help quite a bit with my speed, because I can go up them faster than ever, but there is
    another problem.

    To make a long story short, when I get near the top of the hill, my legs seem to go into
    slow motion.

    So the question is, what sort of drills are suggested to avoid so much of a slow down near the top
    of a hill?

    FYI today I ran a hill in 47.90, when my fastest time before was 48.90. On both of those I was
    barely moving at the top considering how fast I started.

    Many thanks, Roger
     
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  2. Lyndon

    Lyndon Guest

    >A few of you already know I've been training for a 1/4 mile sprint up a fairly good sized hill.
    >
    >I've been doing a few of the leg exercises from the book "Explosive Running" by Michael Yessis, and
    >they seem to help quite a bit with my speed, because I can go up them faster than ever, but there
    >is another problem.
    >
    >To make a long story short, when I get near the top of the hill, my legs seem to go into
    >slow motion.
    >
    >So the question is, what sort of drills are suggested to avoid so much of a slow down near the top
    >of a hill?
    >
    >FYI today I ran a hill in 47.90, when my fastest time before was 48.90. On both of those I was
    >barely moving at the top considering how fast I started.
    >
    >Many thanks, Roger
    >
    It sounds like you've become acquainted with "the bear" (i.e., your legs have become swimming in
    lactate). A couple of principles at work here:

    At MAXIMUM EFFORT, your ability to produce lactate (the strength of the lactic energy system) tops
    out in about 40 seconds. Beyond this point you get into lactic tolerance, or what sprint coaches
    generally call lactic with aerobic assist.

    At MAXIMUM EFFORT, the contribution from aerobic and anerobic energy systems become equal at 90
    seconds. For someone running 400 meters in 45 seconds, the aerobic component as just a few percent.
    But for someone running 400 meters up a hill in twice that time, the aerobic component approaches
    what it would be in a world-class 800.

    There are 3 types of training that can be done:

    (1) High-end VO2max training. One version that would be specific (from Owen Anderson) would be
    repeats of 2-3 minutes at VO2max intensity up a long hill with equal time recovery. This would
    help your ability to supplement your lactic-impaired muscles with aerobic energy.

    (2) Glycolytic training to improve the strength of your lactic energy system. So-called special
    endurance repeats of 300 meters all-out with 15-20 minute rest (full recovery) including 1-2
    lap jog to clear lactate between repeats. Or 8 X 100 all-out with 45-60 second rest, which
    happens to be a very good workout for both anerobic and aerobic energy systems (as a "HIT"
    workout, this has been shown to raise VO2max by up to 15% in previously non-runners). If doing
    these on a hill, you would do repeats of roughly 40 seconds or 15 seconds for the two types.

    (3) Lactic tolerance. The 400 meter equivalent of the well-known 8X400 workout is 3 X 350 at 400
    speed or faster with 3 minutes rest. BEWARE OF THIS WORKOUT. This came originally from Jon
    Douglas and the Santa Monica Track Club. It was 3 X 400, but they had people throwing up all
    over the track, so they shortened it to 3 X 350: "Indy" would have loved it. Only do this type
    of workout when approaching top shape.

    For someone racing 400 on a track in, say, 50 seconds, there isn't a lot of VO2max training done.
    More likely is something like 4 X 600 at 85% intensity early in the season. But 400 meter tempo pace
    is generally developed as doing the workouts in (2) above, and then (3) close to peak racing. But in
    your case, I would think that avoiding some attention to VO2max would be a mistake.

    Lyndon "Speed Kills...It kills those that don't have it!" --US Olympic Track Coach Brooks Johnson
     
  3. Roger 2k

    Roger 2k Guest

    Lyndon wrote in message <[email protected]>...
    >>FYI today I ran a hill in 47.90, when my fastest time before was 48.90.
    On
    >>both of those I was barely moving at the top considering how fast I
    started.
    >>
    >>Many thanks, Roger
    >>
    >There are 3 types of training that can be done:
    >
    >(2) Glycolytic training to improve the strength of your lactic energy
    system.
    > So-called special endurance repeats of 300 meters all-out with 15-20
    minute
    >rest (full recovery) including 1-2 lap jog to clear lactate between
    repeats.
    >Or
    >
    >Lyndon

    Thanks Lyndon,

    So far I've only done two of the 300 meter repeats you list above and today I ran the same hill in
    46.91. That is almost a full second faster than my fastest, just last week.

    It is so strange that I was stuck in the 50+ second range for so long and now my times are dropping
    like mad. Thanks again for the pointers and as with other advise from you, I saved a copy of it.

    Roger
     
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