warm hands at last!

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Glenn Ziolkowsk, Feb 18, 2003.

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  1. My winter riding and commuting has been suffering here in WI, USA since I went 'bent last April, for
    the reason that my hands have been getting uncomfortably cold while riding the bent. Never had that
    problem riding the wedgie down to -5°F last year. This year, on the SWB OSS 'bent, anything less
    than +30°F has been miserable.

    I upgraded to expensive ski gloves a few weeks ago, which turned out to be no better at keeping my
    hands warm than the $5 cheapies I had been using.

    During one of those deep thought sessions during my 45 minute morning commute, I began to think
    about the problem. Hmm, last year, on the wedgie, my feet were getting cold, but hands were fine.
    Now, on the 'bent, feet are fine, hands are cold.... What's different?

    Duh! Their general positions relative to my torso (heart)! Could this be a blood flow problem? While
    riding I took one hand off the OSS bar and dropped it down to my side and Bingo! I could feel the
    blood flowing back into my hand and warming my then frozen fingertips. Within a mile I had both
    hands back to being warm and toasty.

    So now my practice is to drop both hands down to the side at stoplights rather than the usual
    keeping them perched on the bar. No more problems. As a matter of fact, now I notice...hmmm, ya
    know, my feet are kinda cold....

    So, hopefully my 'revelation' will be of some benefit to other OSS riders out there that have cold
    hand syndrome.

    Glenn 2002 Burley HepCat remove .invalid from e-mail address when replying
     
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  2. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Glenn Ziolkowski wrote:
    >
    > My winter riding and commuting has been suffering here in WI, USA since I went 'bent last April,
    > for the reason that my hands have been getting uncomfortably cold while riding the bent. Never had
    > that problem riding the wedgie down to -5°F last year. This year, on the SWB OSS 'bent, anything
    > less than +30°F has been miserable.
    >
    > I upgraded to expensive ski gloves a few weeks ago, which turned out to be no better at keeping my
    > hands warm than the $5 cheapies I had been using.
    >
    > During one of those deep thought sessions during my 45 minute morning commute, I began to think
    > about the problem. Hmm, last year, on the wedgie, my feet were getting cold, but hands were fine.
    > Now, on the 'bent, feet are fine, hands are cold.... What's different?
    >
    > Duh! Their general positions relative to my torso (heart)! Could this be a blood flow problem?
    > While riding I took one hand off the OSS bar and dropped it down to my side and Bingo! I could
    > feel the blood flowing back into my hand and warming my then frozen fingertips. Within a mile I
    > had both hands back to being warm and toasty.
    >
    > So now my practice is to drop both hands down to the side at stoplights rather than the usual
    > keeping them perched on the bar. No more problems. As a matter of fact, now I notice...hmmm, ya
    > know, my feet are kinda cold....
    >
    > So, hopefully my 'revelation' will be of some benefit to other OSS riders out there that have cold
    > hand syndrome.

    It is also possible to sit on one hand at a time while riding a recumbent bicycle, so as to warm
    that hand up.

    Tom Sherman - Recumbent Curmudgeon
     
  3. Tom Sherman wrote:

    > It is also possible to sit on one hand at a time while riding a recumbent bicycle, so as to warm
    > that hand up.

    Tucking it into the opposite armpit may help too, and can be done on an upright as well. Though the
    last time I was called upon to do this - caught in an unexpected blizzard atop Monkside,
    Northumbria, both hands were required on the brakes. By the time we reached the village pub at the
    bottom, I was unable to pick up anything smaller than a pint glass, which made paying for the drinks
    an interesting exercise...

    Dave Larrington - http://legslarry.crosswinds.net/
    ===========================================================
    Editor - British Human Power Club Newsletter
    http://www.bhpc.org.uk/
    ===========================================================
     
  4. Snowman

    Snowman Guest

    Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Glenn Ziolkowski wrote:
    > >
    > > My winter riding and commuting has been suffering here in WI, USA since I went 'bent last April,
    > > for the reason that my hands have been getting uncomfortably cold while riding the bent. Never
    > > had that problem riding the wedgie down to -5°F last year. This year, on the SWB OSS 'bent,
    > > anything less than +30°F has been miserable.
    > >
    > > I upgraded to expensive ski gloves a few weeks ago, which turned out to be no better at keeping
    > > my hands warm than the $5 cheapies I had been using.
    > >
    > > During one of those deep thought sessions during my 45 minute morning commute, I began to think
    > > about the problem. Hmm, last year, on the wedgie, my feet were getting cold, but hands were
    > > fine. Now, on the 'bent, feet are fine, hands are cold.... What's different?
    > >
    > > Duh! Their general positions relative to my torso (heart)! Could this be a blood flow problem?
    > > While riding I took one hand off the OSS bar and dropped it down to my side and Bingo! I could
    > > feel the blood flowing back into my hand and warming my then frozen fingertips. Within a mile I
    > > had both hands back to being warm and toasty.
    > >
    > > So now my practice is to drop both hands down to the side at stoplights rather than the usual
    > > keeping them perched on the bar. No more problems. As a matter of fact, now I notice...hmmm, ya
    > > know, my feet are kinda cold....
    > >
    > > So, hopefully my 'revelation' will be of some benefit to other OSS riders out there that have
    > > cold hand syndrome.
    >
    > It is also possible to sit on one hand at a time while riding a recumbent bicycle, so as to warm
    > that hand up.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Recumbent Curmudgeon

    Better yet look into USS instead of OSS.

    Snowman Haluzak Hybrid Horizon 2002 Los Angeles but freezing my ass off in Rochester
     
  5. Tom Sherman

    Tom Sherman Guest

    Snowman wrote:
    >
    > Better yet look into USS instead of OSS.

    Snowman,

    I fail to see how USS would make any significant difference in keeping one's hands warm compared to
    OSS - please explain.

    I can see a warmth advantage to certain OSS bikes that use a front fairing, as the rider's hands can
    be kept out of the wind behind the fairing - this would require a very wide fairing for a USS bike.

    Tom Sherman - Recumbent Curmudgeon - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)
     
  6. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    Tom Sherman wrote:
    > Snowman wrote:
    >
    >>Better yet look into USS instead of OSS.
    >
    >
    > Snowman,
    >
    > I fail to see how USS would make any significant difference in keeping one's hands warm compared
    > to OSS - please explain.
    >
    > I can see a warmth advantage to certain OSS bikes that use a front fairing, as the rider's hands
    > can be kept out of the wind behind the fairing - this would require a very wide fairing for a
    > USS bike.

    Because rather than having your hands out there in front all by themselves, they are (provided your
    handlebars are appropriately adjusted) right next to your body, even touching your body, which
    reduces the area that is exposed to the wind. Also, the body warms the hands/arms. I have
    experienced this many times.

    PB
     
  7. Dj Blag

    Dj Blag Guest

    I had a USS, and I don't think it would make a difference. Chas
     
  8. Tom Sherman wrote:
    >
    > Snowman wrote:
    > >
    > > Better yet look into USS instead of OSS.
    >
    > Snowman,
    >
    > I fail to see how USS would make any significant difference in keeping one's hands warm compared
    > to OSS - please explain.
    >
    > I can see a warmth advantage to certain OSS bikes that use a front fairing, as the rider's hands
    > can be kept out of the wind behind the fairing - this would require a very wide fairing for a
    > USS bike.
    >
    > Tom Sherman - Recumbent Curmudgeon - Quad Cities USA (Illinois side)

    Even without a front fairing, I keep my hands warm behind my knees. One of the many benefits of a
    pivoting OSS. -5 degrees without gloves and a huge windchill: no problem.

    Kees, no better bike than a Hurricane, Van Malssen
     
  9. Tom Sherman <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Snowman wrote:
    > >
    > > Better yet look into USS instead of OSS.
    >
    > Snowman,
    >
    > I fail to see how USS would make any significant difference in keeping one's hands warm compared
    > to OSS - please explain.

    Well, according to the original post in this thread:

    > Duh! Their general positions relative to my torso (heart)! Could this be a blood flow problem?
    > While riding I took one hand off the OSS bar and dropped it down to my side and Bingo! I could
    > feel the blood flowing back into my hand and warming my then frozen fingertips. Within a mile I
    > had both hands back to being warm and toasty.

    If it's really a blood flow problem, the USS will probably be a lot warmer, since the blood will
    only need to flow down to the hands, instead of horizontally. I haven't really ridden much in the
    cold here (being a wus and riding inside lately), so I can't say for sure, but riding my USS bike
    seems a lot easier than my DF. Greg
     
  10. Paul Bruneau

    Paul Bruneau Guest

    Gregory Leblanc wrote:

    > If it's really a blood flow problem, the USS will probably be a lot warmer, since the blood will
    > only need to flow down to the hands, instead of horizontally. I haven't really ridden much in the
    > cold here (being a wus and riding inside lately), so I can't say for sure, but riding my USS bike
    > seems a lot easier than my DF. Greg

    The blood might get down there easier, but then where does it go? It has to get pumped right back up
    again, which seems like would negate any benefit from it rolling downhill seconds before. Kind of
    like how flats are easier to ride than hills (especially for us).
     
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