Was I right to blow my top?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Wavering, Mar 6, 2004.

  1. Wavering

    Wavering Guest

    My Saturday morning ride ended in a bit of road rage today.
    Did I do the right thing?

    Towards the end of a forty mile ride I was travelling
    downhill in a thirty mph zone about 150 yards from the left
    hand turn into the estate where I
    live. I was coasting at about 24mph and noticed a four
    wheel drive land cruiser type vehicle coming the
    other way. The next thing I am aware of is an SUV
    type vehicle coming from behind and squeezing me off
    the road. I swerved to avoid the SUV and managed to
    brake without hitting the kerb.

    I guy I know happened to be standing on the pavement and
    shouted over "thats shocking" but I just flew after the SUV
    knowing he would have to slow down at a tight bend a couple
    of hundred yards further on. I was shouting and swearing (
    and I almost never swear) and eventually he stopped about a
    hundred yards beyond the tight bend. I then started shouting
    and swearing (again) trying to get him to understand what he
    had just done and I got worse when he said he was nowhere
    near me and anyway I was cycling in the middle of the road
    blocking his way. A bit of a scene ensued which got the
    attention of passers by and I was about to leave when he got
    out of his vehicle and made noises as if he wanted to fight,
    but he quickly changed his mind.

    I was so mad I didn't have the presence of mind to get his
    registration number but both him and his passenger are
    locals, as I recognised their faces, but I am not convinced,
    even with an independent witness, the police would be
    interested in a nearly accident so I probably won't pursue
    it. His passenger was reluctant to back him up in the
    argument and I got the impression he understood how close it
    had been and though the driver was totally unrepentant he
    may have said something in a quieter moment to make my
    outburst worthwhile.

    The thing is when I got home I was angry with myself for
    losing my rag and thinking that cycling (much as I love it )
    isn't worth it. I have been thinking along these lines quite
    a lot recently as I have become a bit paranoid about the
    "normal" near misses.

    Was I right or I have I so enraged this guy he'll make sure
    he hits the next cyclist.
     
    Tags:


  2. Simon Proven

    Simon Proven Guest

    Wavering wrote:

    > [he said] I was cycling in the middle of the road blocking
    > his way.

    The question is: would he have forced a motorcyclist or
    another car to swerve in order for him to save a few
    seconds? Of course not. 24mph downhill in a 30 limit isn't
    an unreasonable speed, it's a shame that more people don't
    realise this.
     
  3. <Snippity>

    > Was I right or I have I so enraged this guy he'll make
    > sure he hits the next cyclist.

    The guy is now totally embarrassed - not only did other
    locals witness his humiliation but so did a good friend. To
    add to his humiliation is was his (lack of) driving skills
    that caused this humiliation. He also wimped out of hitting
    you, which is another dent to his ego. He will give every
    cyclist he meets a wide berth now, particularly you, as he
    knows how big you are. Nice one
    :)
     
  4. pineapple

    pineapple New Member

    Joined:
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    This dumb f*** now realizes that what he thought of as 'normal' driving is actually very dangerous. Hopefully you've made him not just realize this but also act on it. If someone's driving badly and you get the chance to tell him about it, take it. You've done the right thing.
     
  5. Bens

    Bens Guest

    On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 19:32:08 -0000, "Wavering" <None> wrote:

    >My Saturday morning ride ended in a bit of road rage today.
    >Did I do the right thing?
    >
    >Was I right or I have I so enraged this guy he'll make sure
    >he hits the next cyclist.

    Let it go. You're not going to change his mind or his
    driving so what's the point in winding yourself up and
    ruining your ride even more?
    --
    "We take these risks, not to escape from life, but to
    prevent life escaping from us." http://www.bensales.com
     
  6. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Wavering wrote:

    > The thing is when I got home I was angry with myself for
    > losing my rag and thinking that cycling (much as I love it
    > ) isn't worth it. I have been thinking along these lines
    > quite a lot recently as I have become a bit paranoid about
    > the "normal" near misses.

    You did the right thing by letting him know he was in
    the wrong. It's always annoying when you lose your rag,
    play it cool next time, but confront them all the same
    -- much more fun.

    And never think that cycling isn't worth it. The way I see
    it, you can kick the bucket in a thousand different ways at
    any time, and if you happen to be cycling at that moment;
    you're doing something that you love.

    Simon
     
  7. "Wavering" <None> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > My Saturday morning ride ended in a bit of road rage
    > today. Did I do the right thing?
    >
    > Towards the end of a forty mile ride I was travelling
    > downhill in a thirty mph zone about 150 yards from the
    > left hand turn into the estate where I
    > live. I was coasting at about 24mph and noticed a four
    > wheel drive land cruiser type vehicle coming the
    > other way. The next thing I am aware of is an SUV
    > type vehicle coming from behind and squeezing me
    > off the road.....

    I sometimes get this type of behaviour, but generally I get
    enough warning from the engine note to tell if the vehicle
    is trying to squeeze past or hold back, and if it's obvious
    they are trying to squeeze past there is no point in trying
    to outrace it as once it has started to squeeze past it's
    best to just let it continue past, rather than "duelling"
    with it (or banging its roof) like I have seen some
    cyclists do.

    It's like the other day I was cycling along a town centre
    road with a cycle lane, which I avoid as it has a brick
    surface and I stay on the tarmacked traffic lane, and I was
    doing 15mph keeping pace right behind another vehicle, and
    I'm aware of the front of this blue car about 2 foot from my
    right side, like it's overtaking me because it does not like
    to see a cyclist who's not using the brick surface.

    I could have stood my ground, but thought it's not worth it
    so I slow down and let the car past and regain my position
    behind it.
     
  8. Simonb

    Simonb Guest

    Adrian Boliston wrote:

    > I could have stood my ground, but thought it's not worth
    > it so I slow down and let the car past and regain my
    > position behind it.

    Ah. But by doing that are you not reinforcing the flase
    notion that you shouldn't be on the road in the first place?
    By passively moving aside you are acknowledging that you
    should be on the (shitty) brick cycle lane.

    Simon
     
  9. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sat, 6 Mar 2004 20:47:12 -0000, "Adrian Boliston"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    <[email protected]>:

    >I could have stood my ground, but thought it's not worth it
    >so I slow down and let the car past and regain my position
    >behind it.

    Never give in to bullies. And that's exactly what that
    driver was.

    --
    Guy
    ===
    May contain traces of irony. Contents liable to settle after posting.
    http://chapmancentral.demon.co.uk

    88% of helmet statistics are made up, 65% of them at Washington University
     
  10. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Wavering wrote: Snipped..

    > his way. A bit of a scene ensued which got the attention
    > of passers by and I was about to leave when he got out of
    > his vehicle and made noises as if he wanted to fight, but
    > he quickly changed his mind.
    >

    Does anyone else get that feeling of having extraordinarily
    intimidating physical presence over driver's when they get
    out of their cars or are immobile.

    I'm a big bloke, but don't normally feel like it as I was a
    skinny wimp with glasses as a kid, but if a driver starts
    shouting at me, they usually shut up once its person to
    person instead of car to bike.

    In these situations I feel very aware that I am already
    warmed up and far more ready for a scrap than them.

    I'm really not a violent person honest.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this:
    Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  11. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in news:c2doac$jhi$4
    @news6.svr.pol.co.uk:

    > Does anyone else get that feeling of having
    > extraordinarily intimidating physical presence over
    > driver's when they get out of their cars or are immobile.

    Probably because they feel invulnerable in their cars
    surrounded by all that metal. They feel all tough and ready
    to "have a go" then they step out of their cocoon, loose
    their protection and realise they're going up against
    someone who is more likely fitter than them and has
    adrenaline coarsing through their system due to riding in
    traffic. Most sane people will subconsciously pick up on the
    "I'm the dominant one here" signals and back down quickly.

    Of course there's always the situation where the guy that
    gets out of the car is a psycho who's built like a tank. In
    that case you're f*cked :-/

    I try to avoid confrontations such as these as the outcome
    can be very unpredictable, but at times everyone has to
    respond in a way that they need to at the time.

    Graeme
     
  12. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    Graeme wrote:
    > "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in
    > news:c2doac$jhi$4 @news6.svr.pol.co.uk:
    >
    >> Does anyone else get that feeling of having
    >> extraordinarily intimidating physical presence over
    >> driver's when they get out of their cars or are immobile.
    >
    > Probably because they feel invulnerable in their cars
    > surrounded by all that metal. They feel all tough and
    > ready to "have a go" then they step out of their cocoon,
    > loose their protection and realise they're going up
    > against someone who is more likely fitter than them and
    > has adrenaline coarsing through their system due to riding
    > in traffic. Most sane people will subconsciously pick up
    > on the "I'm the dominant one here" signals and back down
    > quickly.
    >
    > Of course there's always the situation where the guy that
    > gets out of the car is a psycho who's built like a tank.
    > In that case you're f*cked :-/
    >

    Thats the one I worry about.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this:
    Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  13. Call Me Bob

    Call Me Bob Guest

    On Sun, 07 Mar 2004 00:56:38 GMT, Graeme
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Of course there's always the situation where the guy that
    >gets out of the car is a psycho who's built like a tank. In
    >that case you're f*cked :-/

    It's this mistake that can land you deep in the sh*t :)

    Be aware that the dangerous part of your description is
    psycho not tank, and that it's more likely the psycho
    getting out of his car will look very ordinary.

    If you're not prepared to deal with nutters who have a
    pretty serious attitude towards violence, you're better off
    avoiding this kind of situation altogether. But then that's
    just common sense, heh.
    --

    "Bob"

    'The people have spoken, the bastards'

    Email address is spam trapped.
    To reply directly remove the beverage.
     
  14. Graeme

    Graeme Guest

    Call me Bob <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:eek:[email protected]:

    > Be aware that the dangerous part of your description is
    > psycho not tank, and that it's more likely the psycho
    > getting out of his car will look very ordinary.

    Yep, they don't all have the Norman Bates intense stare. The
    most dangerous disturbed people are often the most "normal"
    looking ones, probably because when they do flip people
    aren't expecting it.

    Graeme
     
  15. Mseries

    Mseries Guest

    Wavering wrote:
    > My Saturday morning ride ended in a bit of road rage
    > today. Did I do the right thing?
    >

    Not in my opinion, blowing ones top shows a lack of control.
     
  16. My comment on all of this.

    Try to avoid the "getting squeezed off the road" scenario by
    riding in the same position as a car, in what you describe.
    That is the safest way to ride. All the experts on
    cyclecraft recommend it and so do I, who have never been
    knocked off a bike in 45 years cycling, even though I've
    often fallen off myself. The police in my experience (here
    in Ireland) are VERY interested in such misses.
     
  17. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "AndyMorris" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Does anyone else get that feeling of having
    > extraordinarily intimidating physical presence over
    > driver's when they get out of their cars or are immobile.

    Hehe. We used to use the term "big hairy arsed lorry
    drivers" at work but in reality most of them seem to be
    small pot-bellied old blokes with glasses when they climb
    down from the cab. (And I'm not having a go at folks with
    glasses, I wear them, nor lorry drivers just commenting on
    preconceptions).

    And I had a friend who though was perfectly harmless was
    near on 6' 6" tall with a build to match. At one time he had
    a Ford Zodiac Mk IV, the ones modelled on the carrier Ark
    Royal, and during an altercation another motorist shouted
    "Little boys shouldn't have big cars, it was bloody
    hilarious how fast he drove off when my mate unfolded
    himself from his car :)

    But on a serious note remember Kenneth Noye and don't judge
    the other person by their appearance, although people who
    shout from behind a locked car door are unlikely to be a
    fighting threat they may try to "even the score" by using
    their vehicle. <lecture mode off>.
    --
    Regards, Pete
     
  18. Vernon Levy

    Vernon Levy Guest

    > My Saturday morning ride ended in a bit of road rage
    > today. Did I do the right thing?

    Definitely not.

    You'll never hold the moral high ground with elevated blood
    pressure and decibels.

    Soft words win hard arguments.
     
  19. snippity..

    >
    >Was I right or I have I so enraged this guy he'll make sure
    >he hits the next cyclist.

    It's *so* difficult to know that what you do in the
    situation you discribed is right or wrong. Being in a
    situation where you are almost wiped out by some idiot in a
    massive chunk of metal gets the adrenaline going and it
    takes over. The realisation of how things "might have been"
    if you hadn't of got out of the situation okay, can cause a
    person to see red - and understandably so. It's very easy to
    know before and after an event that you should have taken
    the registration number, but when it happens - it goes by so
    quickly. And when it's the fault of some *idiot* who
    shouldn't be in charge of a large vehicle judging by their
    actions, it can easily have the result of *anger* borne out
    of fear/fright/terror.

    Don't worry yourself over your reaction too much - be glad
    you are safe.

    Cheers, helen s

    --This is an invalid email address to avoid spam-- to get
    correct one remove dependency on fame & fortune h*$el*$$e**-
    nd***$o$ts***i*$*$m**m$$o*n**[email protected]$*$a$$o**l.c**$*$om$$
     
  20. Wavering

    Wavering Guest

    In the cool light of the following day I don't feel so bad.
    Maybe I shouldn't have shouted quite so much but "soft words
    win hard arguments" would have had no effect on this guy. I
    also feel more positive about cycling today so I'll head off
    for a short spin.

    "Wavering" <None> wrote in message news:[email protected]
    2.news.uk.tiscali.com...
    > My Saturday morning ride ended in a bit of road rage
    > today. Did I do the right thing?
    >
    > Towards the end of a forty mile ride I was travelling
    > downhill in a thirty mph zone about 150 yards from the
    > left hand turn into the estate where I
    > live. I was coasting at about 24mph and noticed a four
    > wheel drive land cruiser type vehicle coming the
    > other way. The next thing I am aware of is an SUV
    > type vehicle coming from behind and squeezing me
    > off the road. I swerved to avoid the SUV and
    > managed to brake without hitting the kerb.
    >
    > I guy I know happened to be standing on the pavement and
    > shouted over
    "thats
    > shocking" but I just flew after the SUV knowing he would
    > have to slow down at a tight bend a couple of hundred
    > yards further on. I was shouting and swearing ( and I
    > almost never swear) and eventually he stopped about a
    > hundred yards beyond the tight bend. I then started
    > shouting and swearing (again) trying to get him to
    > understand what he had just done and I got worse when he
    > said he was nowhere near me and anyway I was cycling in
    > the middle of the road blocking his way. A bit of a scene
    > ensued which got the attention of passers by and I was
    > about to leave when he got out of his vehicle and made
    > noises as if he wanted to fight, but he quickly changed
    > his mind.
    >
    > I was so mad I didn't have the presence of mind to get his
    > registration number but both him and his passenger are
    > locals, as I recognised their faces, but I am not
    > convinced, even with an independent witness, the
    police
    > would be interested in a nearly accident so I probably
    > won't pursue it.
    His
    > passenger was reluctant to back him up in the argument and
    > I got the impression he understood how close it had been
    > and though the driver was totally unrepentant he may have
    > said something in a quieter moment to
    make
    > my outburst worthwhile.
    >
    > The thing is when I got home I was angry with myself for
    > losing my rag and thinking that cycling (much as I love it
    > ) isn't worth it. I have been thinking along these lines
    > quite a lot recently as I have become a bit paranoid about
    > the "normal" near misses.
    >
    > Was I right or I have I so enraged this guy he'll make
    > sure he hits the
    next
    > cyclist.
    >
    >
     
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