Washington State Coastal route



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F

Fleabit

Guest
We are planning to ride Highway 101 from Port Angeles, WA to Astoria, OR in early June. We have
heard that logging trucks are deadly to cyclists in some sections of this route. Does anyone have
any recent experience with this route who can give us any survival tips for our ride? Rodger & Karen
Denver, CO
 
C

Chuck Anderson

Guest
Fleabit wrote:

> We are planning to ride Highway 101 from Port Angeles, WA to Astoria, OR in early June. We have
> heard that logging trucks are deadly to cyclists in some sections of this route. Does anyone have
> any recent experience with this route who can give us any survival tips for our ride? Rodger &
> Karen Denver, CO

I found the logging truck drivers, especially in Washington and Oregon to be very professional and
excellent drivers (highway 101). They know their trucks well. And quite frankly, having ridden from
Port Angeles to San Francisco once, and from SeaTac to San Francisco another time; I don't have any
impression of logging trucks other than they never bothered me - looked scary - but never seemed a
threat at all.

(RV's with novice drivers; that's what is deadly.)

I don't know any stats, but cyclists being hit by logging trucks on 101 is not something I've heard
discussed before - here or on any other cycling board.

Further down the coast - near Ft. Bragg - there seemed to be some serious contention between logging
/ gravel / wood chip trucks, and bicyclists - all seen as environmentalists (the enemy).

--
**********************************************
Chuck Anderson • Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Tolerance is recognizing that other people
have different ideals and needs than you. Compromise is acting on that knowledge.
***********************************************************
 
D

David Storm

Guest
"Chuck Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Fleabit wrote:
>
> > We are planning to ride Highway 101 from Port Angeles, WA to Astoria, OR
in
> > early June. We have heard that logging trucks are deadly to cyclists in some sections of this
> > route. Does anyone have any recent experience
with
> > this route who can give us any survival tips for our ride? Rodger & Karen Denver, CO
>
> I found the logging truck drivers, especially in Washington and Oregon to
be
> very professional and excellent drivers (highway 101). They know their
trucks
> well. And quite frankly, having ridden from Port Angeles to San Francisco once, and from SeaTac to
> San Francisco another time; I don't have any impression of logging trucks other than they never
> bothered me - looked
scary -
> but never seemed a threat at all.
>
> (RV's with novice drivers; that's what is deadly.)
>
> I don't know any stats, but cyclists being hit by logging trucks on 101 is
not
> something I've heard discussed before - here or on any other cycling
board.
>
> Further down the coast - near Ft. Bragg - there seemed to be some serious contention between
> logging / gravel / wood chip trucks, and bicyclists -
all
> seen as environmentalists (the enemy).
>
> --
> **********************************************
> Chuck Anderson . Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Tolerance is recognizing that other
> people have different ideals and needs than you. Compromise is acting on that knowledge.
> ***********************************************************

I agree. I have found most 18 wheel drivers in NW and
N. Calif. to be professional and most will give room when they can or stay behind until they can
pass. On some narrow winding roads with no shoulder it's best to pull off and let them pass if
possible Its for safety, survival and good manners. Most truckers will appreciate it, and it
presents a good image for bikers.

Now RV drivers and red-necks in pickups, that's another matter. The former are often geriatric and
incompetent to be driving RVs and can't judge distance nor the size of their vehicles. The latter
resent bikers on "their" roads. Just be on the watch for them.
 
B

Bri

Guest
And keep your red blinky lite going all the time :)

David Storm wrote:
>
> "Chuck Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > Fleabit wrote:
> >
> > > We are planning to ride Highway 101 from Port Angeles, WA to Astoria, OR
> in
> > > early June. We have heard that logging trucks are deadly to cyclists in some sections of this
> > > route. Does anyone have any recent experience
> with
> > > this route who can give us any survival tips for our ride? Rodger & Karen Denver, CO
> >
> > I found the logging truck drivers, especially in Washington and Oregon to
> be
> > very professional and excellent drivers (highway 101). They know their
> trucks
> > well. And quite frankly, having ridden from Port Angeles to San Francisco once, and from SeaTac
> > to San Francisco another time; I don't have any impression of logging trucks other than they
> > never bothered me - looked
> scary -
> > but never seemed a threat at all.
> >
> > (RV's with novice drivers; that's what is deadly.)
> >
> > I don't know any stats, but cyclists being hit by logging trucks on 101 is
> not
> > something I've heard discussed before - here or on any other cycling
> board.
> >
> > Further down the coast - near Ft. Bragg - there seemed to be some serious contention between
> > logging / gravel / wood chip trucks, and bicyclists -
> all
> > seen as environmentalists (the enemy).
> >
> > --
> > **********************************************
> > Chuck Anderson . Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Tolerance is recognizing that other
> > people have different ideals and needs than you. Compromise is acting on that knowledge.
> > ***********************************************************
>
> I agree. I have found most 18 wheel drivers in NW and
> N. Calif. to be professional and most will give room when they can or stay behind until they can
> pass. On some narrow winding roads with no shoulder it's best to pull off and let them pass if
> possible Its for safety, survival and good manners. Most truckers will appreciate it, and it
> presents a good image for bikers.
>
> Now RV drivers and red-necks in pickups, that's another matter. The former are often geriatric and
> incompetent to be driving RVs and can't judge distance nor the size of their vehicles. The latter
> resent bikers on "their" roads. Just be on the watch for them.
>
> >
 
D

David Storm

Guest
I use a big reflective slow-vehicle triangle taped to the rear of the bike.

"Bri" <"Share,D,Computer"@boeing.com> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> And keep your red blinky lite going all the time :)
>
> David Storm wrote:
> >
> > "Chuck Anderson" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> > > Fleabit wrote:
> > >
> > > > We are planning to ride Highway 101 from Port Angeles, WA to
Astoria, OR
> > in
> > > > early June. We have heard that logging trucks are deadly to
cyclists in
> > > > some sections of this route. Does anyone have any recent experience
> > with
> > > > this route who can give us any survival tips for our ride? Rodger & Karen Denver, CO
> > >
> > > I found the logging truck drivers, especially in Washington and Oregon
to
> > be
> > > very professional and excellent drivers (highway 101). They know
their
> > trucks
> > > well. And quite frankly, having ridden from Port Angeles to San
Francisco
> > > once, and from SeaTac to San Francisco another time; I don't have any impression of logging
> > > trucks other than they never bothered me -
looked
> > scary -
> > > but never seemed a threat at all.
> > >
> > > (RV's with novice drivers; that's what is deadly.)
> > >
> > > I don't know any stats, but cyclists being hit by logging trucks on
101 is
> > not
> > > something I've heard discussed before - here or on any other cycling
> > board.
> > >
> > > Further down the coast - near Ft. Bragg - there seemed to be some
serious
> > > contention between logging / gravel / wood chip trucks, and
bicyclists -
> > all
> > > seen as environmentalists (the enemy).
> > >
> > > --
> > > **********************************************
> > > Chuck Anderson . Boulder, CO http://www.CycleTourist.com Tolerance is recognizing that other
> > > people have different ideals and needs than you. Compromise is acting on that knowledge.
> > > ***********************************************************
> >
> > I agree. I have found most 18 wheel drivers in NW and
> > N. Calif. to be professional and most will give room when they can or stay behind until they can
> > pass. On some narrow winding roads with no shoulder it's best to pull off and let them pass
> > if possible Its for safety, survival and good manners. Most truckers will appreciate it, and
> > it presents a good image for bikers.
> >
> > Now RV drivers and red-necks in pickups, that's another matter. The former are often geriatric
> > and incompetent to be driving RVs and can't judge distance nor the size of their vehicles. The
> > latter resent bikers on "their" roads. Just be on the watch for them.
> >
> > >
>
 
J

Joshua Putnam

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
[email protected] says...

> I agree. I have found most 18 wheel drivers in NW and
> N. Calif. to be professional and most will give room when they can or stay behind until they can
> pass.

After all, a logging truck driver, unlike a Winnebago driver, has to be able to keep his rig upright
and undamaged on treacherous logging roads. I find log trucks much less intimidating than most other
large trucks, and a lot less frightening than a motorhome screaming down the road with the boarding
steps extended.

--
[email protected] is Joshua Putnam <http://www.phred.org/~josh/> Updated Bicycle Touring Books List:
<http://www.phred.org/~josh/bike/tourbooks.html
 
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