Watch Out for Those...

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by TopCounsel, Feb 24, 2004.

  1. TopCounsel

    TopCounsel Guest

    Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out
    for those...

    (1) Unopened fallen pine cones. These are very hard, and can roll your foot and trash your ankle
    into purple mush faster than you can turn your head back from spitting. My daughter's piano
    teacher couldn't walk for a week without crutches!

    (2) Sweetgum tree seedpods. These are those spiky, brown "golf balls" that litter the street under a
    sweetgum tree. They don't crush as easy as they look like they would, and can result in serious
    injury because they are nearly spherical. Our local school administrator just broke her leg
    after stepping on one that was in the roadway!

    (3) Manhole covers. What is flat for a car's tires is not always flat for your shoes, and you can
    catch an edge or even turn an ankle on the dips in the iron, if you are running tired toward the
    end of a long run.

    (4) Bocce Dots. These are those reflectors they glue to the roads, near to the center lines, and
    also opposite the locations of fire hydrants. If you run toward the center of the road, and go
    back and forth according to traffic, don't underestimate the hazard these present if you are
    tired and not picking up your feet well, or are not paying close attention to your footings.

    (5) Windy Days. Here in SoCal, this means you can suddenly face a 6-foot palm frond with sawteeth
    lying perpendicular to the road! In the dark, this is majorly dangerous. Of course, all kinds of
    other debris can show up on the road after strong winds.
     
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  2. Phil M.

    Phil M. Guest

    [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out for
    > those...

    A freshly poured driveway. The impressions left by my Brooks Adrenalines are now someone's permanent
    reminder of how much they hate runners.

    -Phil
     
  3. TopCounsel <[email protected]> writes:
    : Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out for
    : those...

    : (1) Unopened fallen pine cones. These are very hard, and can roll your foot and trash your ankle
    : into purple mush faster than you can turn your head back from spitting. My daughter's piano
    : teacher couldn't walk for a week without crutches!

    Uh. Try running barefoot. You are going to have to be on the watch for things a lot smaller
    than this. I can now spot something the size of a pea without even looking for it. If I can't I
    don't run! :)

    : (2) Sweetgum tree seedpods. These are those spiky, brown "golf balls" that litter the street under
    : a sweetgum tree. They don't crush as easy as they look like they would, and can result in
    : serious injury because they are nearly spherical. Our local school administrator just broke
    : her leg after stepping on one that was in the roadway!

    It's bigger than a pea.

    : (3) Manhole covers. What is flat for a car's tires is not always flat for your shoes, and you can
    : catch an edge or even turn an ankle on the dips in the iron, if you are running tired toward
    : the end of a long run.

    There is a technique for running on uneven ground in the dark. I let you expriment to find it.

    : (4) Bocce Dots. These are those reflectors they glue to the roads, near to the center lines, and
    : also opposite the locations of fire hydrants. If you run toward the center of the road, and go
    : back and forth according to traffic, don't underestimate the hazard these present if you are
    : tired and not picking up your feet well, or are not paying close attention to your footings.

    After thinking that one of these was flat enough to step on, I found that they are slipperier than
    goose shit. Don't step on them.

    : (5) Windy Days. Here in SoCal, this means you can suddenly face a 6-foot palm frond with sawteeth
    : lying perpendicular to the road! In the dark, this is majorly dangerous. Of course, all kinds
    : of other debris can show up on the road after strong winds.

    Running into a good headwind builds character. Pretend you are going uphill!

    Larry
     
  4. Steve Hansen

    Steve Hansen Guest

    TopCounsel wrote:

    > Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out for
    > those...

    Holes in the pavement, hidden under a thin layer of leaves. In south Florida, I think there must be
    some law against raking the live-oak leaves off the sidewalk. Under every oak tree, there is a patch
    of sidwalk or street that cannot be seen.
     
  5. Pine cones, seeds and wind. Yeah, all those sissy/jogger comparisons are unwarranted.
     
  6. Gone Tag .

    Gone Tag . Guest

    On 24 Feb 2004 19:52:39 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out
    >for those...

    Good God! What an over active imagination you have to find such adventures in the minutia of life.

    You haven't done much with your time on earth, have you?
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, Gone Tag wrote:
    > On 24 Feb 2004 19:52:39 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:
    >
    >>Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out for
    >>those...
    >
    > Good God! What an over active imagination you have to find such adventures in the minutia of life.
    >
    > You haven't done much with your time on earth, have you?

    He's been to Mali.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  8. TopCounsel

    TopCounsel Guest

    >Good God! What an over active imagination you have to find such adventures in the minutia of life.
    >
    >You haven't done much with your time on earth, have you?
    >

    Would you prefer yet another "dogbite" thread? More exciting threads about high-tech gadgets for
    folks who can't check their health and running ability without an electronic dipstick? Should I
    post about an imaginary "knee problem?" Or perhaps another ingenious but nauseating thread
    concerning prior

    recent past out of the British isles?
     
  9. Gone Tag .

    Gone Tag . Guest

    On 25 Feb 2004 17:02:58 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >Would you prefer yet another "dogbite" thread? More exciting threads about high-tech gadgets for
    >folks who can't check their health and running ability without an electronic dipstick? Should I
    >post about an imaginary "knee problem?" Or perhaps another ingenious but nauseating thread
    >concerning prior

    >recent past out of the British isles?

    Zowie!!! I claim a direct hit on your exposed nerve!

    Seriously, you must calm down. Losing it never does anyone any good.
     
  10. Gone Tag .

    Gone Tag . Guest

    On Wed, 25 Feb 2004 15:58:30 +0000 (UTC), Donovan Rebbechi
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >He's been to Mali.

    Stop coming up with smart-arse answers to my pointed observations.
     
  11. In article <[email protected]>, TopCounsel wrote:
    >>Good God! What an over active imagination you have to find such adventures in the minutia of life.
    >>
    >>You haven't done much with your time on earth, have you?
    >>
    >
    > Would you prefer yet another "dogbite" thread? More exciting threads about high-tech gadgets for
    > folks who can't check their health and running ability without an electronic dipstick?

    How about special winter clothing that is equipped with a thermostat and adjusts its thermal
    properties depending on your body temperature ? It could even come with a watch that streams
    metereological data (displayed on the runners GPS watch) from satellites and prepares the wearer for
    approaching dangers like rain.

    The suit would feature legs made out of a new high-tec fabric called "DogStopper". This is the only
    true dogproof fabric -- you can test it in the store by wrapping it around your finger and biting
    yourself. If you get teeth-marks, as is often the case with inferior "DogPro" and "DogJammer"
    fabrics, then the fabric is only dog-resistant, though dog-resistant fabric is OK as long as you
    don't get cornered by a pack of hungry wolves. However, the manufacturers of DogPro believe that
    most runners will need the extra margin of safety.

    The suit also includes "dog trauma" protection by using an innovative hat that includes a digital
    filter that makes frightening dog barks sound like pleasent cat meows.

    To order one of these suits, send a blank cheque to my PO box.

    Cheers,
    --
    Donovan Rebbechi http://pegasus.rutgers.edu/~elflord/
     
  12. Ed prochak

    Ed prochak Guest

    Steve Hansen <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > TopCounsel wrote:
    >
    > > Whether you run in the dark a lot like me, or in bright daylight, you will want to watch out for
    > > those...
    >
    > Holes in the pavement, hidden under a thin layer of leaves. In south Florida, I think there must
    > be some law against raking the live-oak leaves off the sidewalk. Under every oak tree, there is a
    > patch of sidwalk or street that cannot be seen.

    The variation is a water filled pothole. It's nearly impossible to see sometimes and even if you
    don't get hurt, you do get wet! 8^)

    Ed
     
  13. Aiseopos

    Aiseopos Guest

    On 25 Feb 2004 17:21:15 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >>Seriously, you must calm down. Losing it never does anyone any good.
    >
    >Y'think so? Let me check my "HRM." Ooops, I forgot, I don't own one -- I just run for the joy of
    >it. Now then, what makes you think I'm not calm?

    I could see you jumping up and down in your chair.
     
  14. "Phil M." <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    Exposed rocks and stones that **used** to be buried before that last rain. You go running in the semi-
    dark because you think you know the trail, and then a recent rain exposes all these surprises.

    I went down for a month after rolling my ankle of a rock that hadn't been there before (of course it
    had but had been buried).
     
  15. Aiseopos

    Aiseopos Guest

    On 25 Feb 2004 17:02:58 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >Or perhaps another ingenious but nauseating thread

    And while I'm picking on you, what in heaven's name do you find so 'nauseating' in my little tales?

    That's an absolutely rotten thing to say about a fellows writing. Well, it's rotten if it's done
    without due cause. So, provide your evidence or retract, you Yankee scoundrel you.
     
  16. Aiseopos

    Aiseopos Guest

    On 25 Feb 2004 20:16:09 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >Well...since you asked...Your little vignette read more like the account of a ...(dare I say
    >it?)...woman? Not exactly the kinds of details guys generally are interested in (e.g., "Her
    >Windsong stays on my mind.."...(retch)).

    Hmm? I don't recall writing such drivel. Point me towards the offending post.

    > Not to mention that many would consider such stuff OT unless posted to Penthouse Forum.

    Ah, here you have both feet firmly placed in the sinking sands of Usenet. Evidence would suggest
    that *nothing* can be considered OT on rec.running.

    I consider my inane ramblings to be the ideal antidote to the endless newbie trivia and expert
    ponderings to which I'm subjected every time I visit this place. Sure, I could stop visiting, but
    then I'd miss the occasional interesting poster such as yourself, who has both something
    illuminating to say and makes the effort to say it in a stylish manner.

    Now, can I stop being nice and return to my normal boorish self?

    >Bottom line: I only called you nauseating because you called me boring. I may never grow up.

    Nor I. Coming out to play in the back yard?
     
  17. Aiseopos

    Aiseopos Guest

    On 25 Feb 2004 21:17:30 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >I can say with total honesty that the happiest single moment in my life was the following morning
    >as I cycled along the farm track to the local shop to buy bacon and eggs for breakfast. I really,
    >really, thought my heart would burst, I was just so *completely* happy. The nice thing is, I only
    >have to close my eyes and I can remember almost exactly how it felt.

    Pardon me? You call this writing 'feminine' and 'nauseating'? Why? Because it expresses emotions in
    a manner you find uncomfortable? Because it came as an unpleasant shock to discover such words
    secreted amongst the dickey knees and the requests for a 10k schedule? Because you really don't give
    a fcuk what makes me happy?

    I think you have to consider, for a moment, why any of us are here on Usenet, indeed why any of us
    participate in any communal aspect of society. Sure, it's about sharing information on a subject of
    common interest, reinforcing our beliefs or having our beliefs challenged. But we can do all that
    without communicating. We can read books, use the net, hire instructional videos, etc. We don't
    *need* to interact directly with others to acquire knowledge or to improve our understanding of a
    subject. That we choose to do so suggests that there are more complex factors at work other than the
    mere information-gathering mechanisms.

    My 'contributions' to rec.running rarely centre on the mechanics of running - such information is
    available more succinctly elsewhere - they dance around the 'whys and wherefores' of a life centred
    on running. I'm attempting to create a total picture of a running life
    - sure, it's got lots of other stuff all jumbled in there too, hence the 'feminine' posts - but
    running provides the core stability and direction that enables me to face failure with stoicism
    and success with humility.

    There are a number of posters here who've been through - some are still experiencing - trying times.
    They choose to use running as a link with their past life or as a lifeline to better times. Some
    write to me about their lives. I hope my replies to them make sense, or that the pictures I paint
    using words are of relevance to their world and situation. Point being, running is a mechanism
    through which some of us choose to see the world. It's a physical manifestation of our personality.
    We try too hard, fall over, then get up and try hard again. Sometimes we aren't up to it, sometimes
    we surprise ourselves. It's fun, it's exposed and it's very real. It's ghastly to watch when it goes
    wrong, and it's beautiful when it goes well. I like living in an emotional, edgy, challenging world.
    Sorry, that's my feminine side peeking out again.

    I will accept that I'm at one end of the spectrum - that perhaps I provide a little *too much
    information*. Nevertheless, it's a place in which I'm comfortable and in which I intend to remain.

    Almost the last conversation I had with my father before he was killed concerned my hopes for
    my future. I gave the usual 'fighter pilot/war hero/saviour of the world' answer - he grinned
    his approval
    - but then added that in achieving these lofty goals I may well miss out on the hardships life has
    to offer. After I'd suggested this was no bad thing, he thought for a while and said that,
    perhaps, one day I'd see it differently. And sure enough, thirty-odd years on, I think I was
    taught more by my failures than my successes. In fact I'd go so far as to say that a life without
    failure - deep, depressing, glorious failure - is only half a life, indeed it's a life with the
    best bits missing.

    If you're afraid of failing, of making a fool of yourself, of rejection, of ridicule, you make
    yourself a hostage to the dreams of others. You forever measure yourself against their standards,
    standards you neither own nor are able to influence. To me, writing 'nauseating' thoughts on
    rec.running is as important a freedom as the right to run the trails unmolested. It's a simple
    statement of 'me'. You're entitled to your opinion, of course, though I'd venture to suggest it
    isn't *your* opinion you're offering, rather the opinion of a soul conditioned by behavioural
    constraints that suffocate your true personality.

    C'mon TC. As you sit in your office write one emotion-strewn sentence that you'd REALLY like to say
    but are afraid of what others might think. Then delete it. There! Even that felt good, didn't it?

    The only *real* difference between us is that I'd press 'send'. Well, that, and the fact that I'm a
    nauseating girlie.
     
  18. Cumulus

    Cumulus Guest

    On 26 Feb 2004 17:46:13 GMT, [email protected] (TopCounsel) wrote:

    >>My 'contributions' to rec.running rarely centre on the mechanics of running -

    >But perhaps they should do so more often.

    I think not, and I'll tell you why

    To offer advice that is valuable and relevant to a runner requires an intimate knowledge of many
    factors specific to that runner. Simply watching an athlete run during a speed-endurance session can
    tell you more about them - physically and psychologically - than would having access to 10,000 data
    points on that athlete. However, I'm sure Donny would disagree.

    The sad thing is, most runners - whether they be recreational or competitive - actually know far
    more about themselves and the sport than they realise. Once you've absorbed the current thinking on
    training techniques, biomechanics, injury prevention, etc., it really is just down to tailoring you
    exercise programme to suit your own aims, ambitions and physical capacity. In other words, you are
    your own best coach and advisor.

    On that basis, we could spend our time on rec.running teasing each other and telling tall tales,
    rather than debating the merits of Lydiard's head-up-his-botty meanderings.

    > You were able yesterday in probably 3 minutes to give a more appropriate and succinct answer for
    > someone's 5000m training plan than all the other posts on that thread combined

    That's 'cause there were no other schedules posted :)

    > Who knows how many folks may incorporate all or part of your input into their own training plans?

    But that's the point! Why would anyone want to do that? I don't know the first thing about them,
    neither does Daniels, Henderson, nor any other running guru you care to mention. They generalise,
    where *every* runner needs specifics. You can obtain these specifics in one of two ways; go to a
    coach, or learn what you need and apply it to your own situation. Either is to be preferred to
    consulting an 'expert' on a newsgroup or reading a schedule written by some duffus from Illinois (or
    Scotland).

    >Not really; where else can you get the Q & A of usenet, unless you have a coach or are in a
    >running club?

    If you're 'serious' about running and you can't be bothered to find out the information you require
    to coach yourself, then with a coach or running club you should be.

    >Emotions? What are those? First you tell me I need to "calm down," because I have "lost it," and
    >now suddenly you imply that I never post with raw feeling? Which is it?

    You need to ask? I'd prefer that you post with raw feeling every time. Even if that occasionally
    makes you look angry/stupid/irrational/dumb.

    It's been my experience that people say the most valuable and interesting stuff when they're REALLY
    mad. That's when their brain shifts into automatic and, in amongst the dross, the most radical and
    challenging concepts pop out. Kinda like Donny yesterday. The only time he makes me think is when he
    gets annoyed. He should do it more often.

    > I do try to post candidly, but I also try to follow the "count-to-ten" rule: If you're riled,
    > count to ten slowly before you open your mouth.

    That single rule has stifled more innovation, created more psychological problems, maintained more
    bad friendships and marriages, caused more deep and abiding resentment, and destroyed more promising
    personalities than any other I would care to mention. That rule is not your friend.
     
  19. Doug Freese

    Doug Freese Guest

    Cumulus wrote:

    > To offer advice that is valuable and relevant to a runner requires an intimate knowledge of many
    > factors specific to that runner. Simply watching an athlete run during a speed-endurance session
    > can tell you more about them - physically and psychologically - than would having access to 10,000
    > data points on that athlete. However, I'm sure Donny would disagree.

    Of course ideal help is up close and personal. You're almost at the private coach level. To suggest
    that the 10k data points are not useful at least to establish some working boundaries is ludicrous.
    It's like saying you have to attend class to learn and home self teaching can't work.

    >
    > The sad thing is, most runners - whether they be recreational or competitive - actually know far
    > more about themselves and the sport than they realise.

    We agree.

    > Once you've absorbed the current thinking on training techniques, biomechanics, injury prevention,
    > etc., it really is just down to tailoring you exercise programme to suit your own aims, ambitions
    > and physical capacity.

    And once you understand the meaning of life you will find complete and total happiness. The
    statement is also true but who the hell thinks they have that level or will ever achieve it? Hell,
    Sam's job in a way is to study and keep abreast but I'll bet he learns a lot a new things ever day.
    I don't see him pontificating but adding data points to ponder It's a moving target and once you
    think you know it all you're a fool.

    > In other words, you are your own best coach and advisor.

    BS! Self coaching does more harm than good. It's when you believe the above you become your own
    worst enemy. You're as usual on an ego roll. Pull foot incert brain.

    > On that basis, we could spend our time on rec.running teasing each other and telling tall tales,
    > rather than debating the merits of Lydiard's head-up-his-botty meanderings.

    Says a lot about you and not promising.

    >>Who knows how many folks may incorporate all or part of your input into their own training plans?
    >
    >
    > But that's the point! Why would anyone want to do that? I don't know the first thing about them,
    > neither does Daniels, Henderson, nor any other running guru you care to mention. They generalise,
    > where *every* runner needs specifics. You can obtain these specifics in one of two ways; go to a
    > coach, or learn what you need and apply it to your own situation. Either is to be preferred to
    > consulting an 'expert' on a newsgroup or reading a schedule written by some duffus from Illinois
    > (or Scotland).

    So you don't believe you can learn by asking and making modification? Did you miss your meds
    this week?

    > You need to ask? I'd prefer that you post with raw feeling every time. Even if that occasionally
    > makes you look angry/stupid/irrational/dumb.

    And Roger, you are the master of angry/stupid/irrational/dumb

    > That single rule has stifled more innovation, created more psychological problems, maintained more
    > bad friendships and marriages, caused more deep and abiding resentment, and destroyed more
    > promising personalities than any other I would care to mention. That rule is not your friend.

    A great troll because if you believe this you are sad depressed person and may want to see Dr.
    Kavorkian for some help. I think you have have found a way to twist his buttons. Sometimes I laugh
    with you but more often I laugh at you! Head for the medicine cabinet and get back on those anti-
    depressents!

    --
    Doug Freese "Caveat Lector" [email protected]
     
  20. Cumulus

    Cumulus Guest

    On Fri, 27 Feb 2004 13:36:15 GMT, Doug Freese <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Head for the medicine cabinet and get back on those anti-depressents!

    Douglas, stop trying to troll me, you rarely succeed :)
     
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