Water bottles that don't ruin the taste?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by David L. Johnso, Mar 30, 2003.

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  1. I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers, not
    cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles, and is
    not what I am after.

    Anyone have suggestions?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
    knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have not
    charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
    Tags:


  2. > I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    > I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers, not
    > cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles, and is
    > not what I am after.

    Sometimes it varies from batch to batch. The current custom-printed bottles I'm getting from TREK
    have been wonderful (no smell, no taste) but the prior batch wasn't. Another problem is that
    sometimes a new bottle can smell bad, but impart no apparent taste to the water, so I really don't
    have a sure-fire way of knowing before trying.

    --Mike-- Chain Reaction Bicycles http://www.ChainReactionBicycles.com
     
  3. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    > I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers, not
    > cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles, and is
    > not what I am after.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions?

    I have had good luck with Polar bottles. Helps keep drinks cold or hot, imparts no taste, seems to
    be long lasting. The only downside is the logo. After a bit, the decal gets loose and eventually
    just needs to be scraped off.

    http://www.polarbottle.com/

    -Buck
     
  4. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "Mike Jacoubowsky"
    <[email protected]> writes:

    > Sometimes it varies from batch to batch. The current custom-printed bottles I'm getting from TREK
    > have been wonderful (no smell, no taste) but the prior batch wasn't. Another problem is that
    > sometimes a new bottle can smell bad, but impart no apparent taste to the water, so I really don't
    > have a sure-fire way of knowing before trying.

    I suspect that a lot of times, that plastic taste results from sunlight shining on, and being
    absorbed by the bottle. So I go with white (not clear) ones. They seem to me to not suffer from that
    effect as much as coloured or clear bottles. This is just conjecture based on empirical experience
    on my part. A scoop or two of ice tea powder can help, too.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  5. >Anyone have suggestions?

    I get it out of a machine. The Dasani bottles cost a buck and they fit my bottle cages. When the
    water is gone you either toss or refill. If they start to taste nasty you toss them, easy.

    It isn't rocket science if you're on the road every day. Water bottles are disposable items.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  6. On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 23:07:28 -0500, Buck wrote:

    > I have had good luck with Polar bottles. Helps keep drinks cold or hot, imparts no taste, seems to
    > be long lasting. The only downside is the logo. After a bit, the decal gets loose and eventually
    > just needs to be scraped off.

    Sounds like they are worth a try.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | A mathematician is a machine for turning coffee into theorems. _`\(,_ | -- Paul Erdos
    (_)/ (_) |
     
  7. Peter Cole

    Peter Cole Guest

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On Sun, 30 Mar 2003 23:07:28 -0500, Buck wrote:
    >
    > > I have had good luck with Polar bottles. Helps keep drinks cold or hot, imparts no taste, seems
    > > to be long lasting. The only downside is the logo. After a bit, the decal gets loose and
    > > eventually just needs to be scraped off.
    >
    > Sounds like they are worth a try.
    >

    I'll second the Polars. The insulation makes a real difference, and they don't seem to make the
    water taste plastic-ey.
     
  8. Smokey

    Smokey Guest

    "Buck" <j u n k m a i l @ g a l a x y c o r p . c o m> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    > > I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers,
    > > not cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles,
    > > and is not what I am after.
    > >
    > > Anyone have suggestions?
    >
    > I have had good luck with Polar bottles. Helps keep drinks cold or hot, imparts no taste, seems to
    > be long lasting. The only downside is the logo. After a bit, the decal gets loose and eventually
    > just needs to be scraped off.
    >
    > http://www.polarbottle.com/
    >
    > -Buck

    i agree 100%, Buck. polars are wonderful. they keep drinks cold much longer than standard
    non-insulated bottles. i give mine a quick shot of hot water and a few drops of dishwashing
    detergent after use and they stay fresh, imparting no taste to the drinks inside. mine have also
    been very durable, after a few unintended drops to the pavement at speed. smokey
     
  9. Nyrides

    Nyrides Guest

    I find that any water bottle will lose its nasty plastic taste after a few rinsings with pure
    lemon juice.

    --
    Low-Impact Rides in the NY/LI region www.geocities.com/NYRides "David L. Johnson"
    <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    > I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers, not
    > cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles, and is
    > not what I am after.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions?
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
    > knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have
    > not charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  10. Allan Leedy

    Allan Leedy Guest

    Opaque bottles, rather than clear, mask that unappetizing mold that grows in the bottle sometimes.
    As for taste, what works best for me is to cover it up. I use Trader Joe's unfiltered cranberry
    juice blend, about 80% diluted.

    "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    > I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers, not
    > cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles, and is
    > not what I am after.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions?
    >
    > --
    >
    > David L. Johnson
    >
    > __o | And though I have the gift of prophecy, and understand all _`\(,_ | mysteries, and all
    > knowledge; and though I have all faith, so (_)/ (_) | that I could remove mountains, and have
    > not charity, I am nothing. [1 Corinth. 13:2]
     
  11. Pete Hickey

    Pete Hickey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, David L. Johnson <[email protected]> wrote:
    >I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the
    >water. ...

    The past few years, I've been using an old gatorade bottle. Gatorade comes in all kinds/sizes of
    bottles. I have one with a sort of twist-open top, and about 700ml in size.

    --
    --
    LITTLE KNOWN FACT: Did you know that 90% of North Americans cannot taste the difference between
    fried dog and fried cat?
     
  12. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    Speaking of water, anyone ever take a drag on their Camelbak hose and dislodge a chunk of the black
    plug you didn't know was lurking in your mouthpiece?
     
  13. Robin Hubert

    Robin Hubert Guest

    Who drinks water for the taste? As long as it ain't toxic, why fuss?
     
  14. Mikeyankee

    Mikeyankee Guest

    On my beater I usually use 16-oz plastic soda bottles with push-pull valve caps salvaged from
    mineral water bottles.

    But would "Style Man" approve?

    Mike Yankee

    (Address is munged to thwart spammers. To reply, delete everything after "com".)
     
  15. "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > I have been trying to find a water bottle that will not add that garden-hose taste to the water.
    > I've tried Nalgene, which makes a good bottle which does not fit in a cage (meant for hikers, not
    > cyclists). Their cycling water-bottle is made of the same stuff as all other water bottles, and is
    > not what I am after.
    >
    > Anyone have suggestions?

    Fill them up from your garden hose in the first place. you save on both bottles and water.

    dl
     
  16. Jym Dyer

    Jym Dyer Guest

    =v= If you don't mind losing squeezability, you can get an enamel-lined aluminum water bottle from
    Zefal. Mine has gotten a few dents in the last 3 years, but the enamel's held up.

    =v= Most bottles are HDPE or LDPE plastic, which makes them squeezable, but imparts a yucky taste.

    =v= I once had an HDPE bottle with a really excellent carbon filter in the lid, which filtered out
    not only the yucky plastic taste but the yucky stuff in tapwater and hosewater wherever I'd travel.
    It was sold by Gaiam, but they don't carry it anymore and I can't get replacement filters. :^( Brita
    makes something along the same lines, but it's not nearly as good a product.

    =v= Many drinks are now packaged in PETE plastic, which doesn't mess with the flavor as much, but is
    less squeezable. Gatorade and some other sugary product in a bluish bottle with a blue cap will fit
    in a water bottle cage, and the pop-tops are nice and big. (I don't want to spend money on that
    junk, so I snitch them out of curbside recycling bins.)

    > Who drinks water for the taste? As long as it ain't toxic, why fuss?

    =v= Bad news: all of the aforementioned plastics are toxic in some way. That's why I went for the
    enamel-lined bottle.

    >> polars are wonderful. they keep drinks cold much longer than standard non-insulated bottles.

    =v= Yep, they work well in freezing weather. That's the biggest disadvantage to my enamel-lined
    bottle. I was thinking of trying to find a good thermos for next winter. <_Jym_
     
  17. Jym Dyer <[email protected]> wrote:

    :>> polars are wonderful. they keep drinks cold much longer than standard non-insulated bottles.
    :
    : =v= Yep, they work well in freezing weather. That's the biggest disadvantage to my enamel-lined
    : bottle. I was thinking of trying to find a good thermos for next winter.

    I don't know. I checked out a Polar bottle today. Opened it up; the smell was awful. I
    didn't buy it.

    So, why don't they use the same plastic they use for bottled water? I don't care how squeezable it
    is. I am not so sure about an enamled aluminum bottle, either.

    --

    David L. Johnson [email protected] [email protected] Department of Mathematics
    http://www.lehigh.edu/~dlj0/dlj0.html Lehigh University 14 E. Packer Avenue (610) 758-3759
    Bethlehem, PA 18015-3174
     
  18. Bill

    Bill Guest

    Try the clear large mouth bottles from Specialized. Frequently private labeled but will have
    specialized imprinted on the bottom. Bill

    "Jym Dyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > =v= If you don't mind losing squeezability, you can get an enamel-lined aluminum water bottle from
    > Zefal. Mine has gotten a few dents in the last 3 years, but the enamel's held up.
    >
    > =v= Most bottles are HDPE or LDPE plastic, which makes them squeezable, but imparts a yucky taste.
    >
    > =v= I once had an HDPE bottle with a really excellent carbon filter in the lid, which filtered out
    > not only the yucky plastic taste but the yucky stuff in tapwater and hosewater wherever I'd
    > travel. It was sold by Gaiam, but they don't carry it anymore and I can't get replacement filters.
    > :^( Brita makes something along the same lines, but it's not nearly as good a product.
    >
    > =v= Many drinks are now packaged in PETE plastic, which doesn't mess with the flavor as much, but
    > is less squeezable. Gatorade and some other sugary product in a bluish bottle with a blue cap will
    > fit in a water bottle cage, and the pop-tops are nice and big. (I don't want to spend money on
    > that junk, so I snitch them out of curbside recycling bins.)
    >
    > > Who drinks water for the taste? As long as it ain't toxic, why fuss?
    >
    > =v= Bad news: all of the aforementioned plastics are toxic in some way. That's why I went for the
    > enamel-lined bottle.
    >
    > >> polars are wonderful. they keep drinks cold much longer than standard non-insulated bottles.
    >
    > =v= Yep, they work well in freezing weather. That's the biggest disadvantage to my enamel-lined
    > bottle. I was thinking of trying to find a good thermos for next winter. <_Jym_
     
  19. Bernie

    Bernie Guest

    Bill wrote:

    > Try the clear large mouth bottles from Specialized. Frequently private labeled but will have
    > specialized imprinted on the bottom. Bill
    >
    > "Jym Dyer" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > =v= If you don't mind losing squeezability, you can get an enamel-lined aluminum water bottle
    > > from Zefal. Mine has gotten a few dents in the last 3 years, but the enamel's held up.
    > >
    > > =v= Most bottles are HDPE or LDPE plastic, which makes them squeezable, but imparts a yucky
    > > taste.
    > >
    > > =v= I once had an HDPE bottle with a really excellent carbon filter in the lid, which filtered
    > > out not only the yucky plastic taste but the yucky stuff in tapwater and hosewater wherever I'd
    > > travel. It was sold by Gaiam, but they don't carry it anymore and I can't get replacement
    > > filters. :^( Brita makes something along the same lines, but it's not nearly as good a product.
    > >
    > > =v= Many drinks are now packaged in PETE plastic, which doesn't mess with the flavor as much,
    > > but is less squeezable. Gatorade and some other sugary product in a bluish bottle with a blue
    > > cap will fit in a water bottle cage, and the pop-tops are nice and big. (I don't want to spend
    > > money on that junk, so I snitch them out of curbside recycling bins.)
    > >
    > > > Who drinks water for the taste? As long as it ain't toxic, why fuss?
    > >
    > > =v= Bad news: all of the aforementioned plastics are toxic in some way. That's why I went for
    > > the enamel-lined bottle.
    > >
    > > >> polars are wonderful. they keep drinks cold much longer than standard non-insulated bottles.
    > >
    > > =v= Yep, they work well in freezing weather. That's the biggest disadvantage to my enamel-lined
    > > bottle. I was thinking of trying to find a good thermos for next winter. <_Jym_>

    You can get Nalgene bottles for bicycle bottle cages. Saw a couple today. ($9.99 CAD) in Edmonds
    Cycle Burnaby. They had covers to keep the dirt off the mouthpieces. My Nalgene experiences are from
    when I was hiking. Top quality bottles, no plastic taste. Best regards, Bernie
     
  20. On Fri, 04 Apr 2003 23:50:04 +0000, Bernie wrote:

    >> Try the clear large mouth bottles from Specialized. Frequently private labeled but will have
    >> specialized imprinted on the bottom.

    I will look around for those.

    > You can get Nalgene bottles for bicycle bottle cages. Saw a couple today. ($9.99 CAD) in Edmonds
    > Cycle Burnaby. They had covers to keep the dirt off the mouthpieces. My Nalgene experiences are
    > from when I was hiking. Top quality bottles, no plastic taste.

    My daughter got me one of these. But, unlike the hiking bottles, which are Lexan, these bottles are
    made of the same old stuff, and have IMO the same problem.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | Become MicroSoft-free forever. Ask me how. _`\(,_ | (_)/ (_) |
     
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