Water water ...

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Darren G, Aug 4, 2004.

  1. Jim Ford

    Jim Ford Guest

    * The air of uk.rec.walking was filled with the delicate perfume
    * of violets, as Roger <[email protected]> descended on a shaft
    * of golden sunlight, and announced:

    > time as the miscreant was not seen. The Dr favoured a hornet but I have
    > never even seen one of them.


    We've got a hornets' nest in the sofit. I'd seen one or two arround and
    found the nest yesterday. When I investigated closer (the're handsome
    insects - and huge, about 30mm long!) one stung me on the wrist. The sting
    site went reddish and swelled up a bit, but there was less pain than a
    nettle sting. It's slightly red now and just itches a bit.

    Regards: Jim Ford
     


  2. On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 09:32:33 +0000 (UTC), "KRO" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >You can tell by the colour of your (cough) urine


    you really should see someone about that, anything more than a bit of
    phlegm is a cause for concern...
     
  3. On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 14:07:27 +0100, Dave Fawthrop
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >In the UK a pint per day is IMO a bit OTT.


    I don't drink much, but was told recently by a doctor that you should
    drink 2-3 pints per day on a 'normal' (ie inactive) day, considerably
    more if you're exercising. Most people are dehydrated most of the
    time, and this is one cause for the high sales of aspirin and the
    like.
     
  4. On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 12:47:19 +0100, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 12:15:25 +0100, Roger <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>I wish you well on Scafell. I won't be out. I am currently sidelined
    >>with a badly swollen leg from yet another wasp sting.

    >
    >Bad luck, sounds like a fairly allergic reaction ?


    From the sound of it, wasps are allergic to Roger and react by
    stinging him :-|
     
  5. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 21:12:38 +0100, Simon Caldwell
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 14:07:27 +0100, Dave Fawthrop
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>In the UK a pint per day is IMO a bit OTT.

    >
    >I don't drink much, but was told recently by a doctor that you should
    >drink 2-3 pints per day on a 'normal' (ie inactive) day, considerably
    >more if you're exercising. Most people are dehydrated most of the
    >time, and this is one cause for the high sales of aspirin and the
    >like.


    A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you count
    the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people are
    dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been round
    this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time, iirc).
    Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an animal
    that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is somehow
    dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for extreme
    exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.

    --
    A man without a woman is like a neck without pain.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  6. On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 22:12:32 +0100, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you count
    >the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people are
    >dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been round
    >this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time, iirc).
    >Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an animal
    >that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is somehow
    >dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for extreme
    >exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.


    I can't argue with any of that, I was just repeating what I was told
    by someone I'd expect to know.
    Though millions of years of evolution have certainly led to an animal
    that voluntarily dehydrates itself by use of alcohol ;-)
     
  7. On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 22:12:32 +0100, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >
    >A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you count
    >the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people are
    >dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been round
    >this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time, iirc).
    >Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an animal
    >that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is somehow
    >dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for extreme
    >exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.


    I can't argue with any of that, I was just repeating what I was told
    by someone I'd expect to know.
    Though millions of years of evolution have certainly led to an animal
    that voluntarily dehydrates itself by use of alcohol ;-)
     
  8. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 12:06:21 +0100, Roger <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    [...]
    >After a weekend away I am usually 3 or 4lbs lighter


    !!! Is it too late for me to head for the Lakes tomorrow evening??
    :)

    >but will put almost
    >all back on within 24 hours.


    Oh... :-(


    ;-)


    Best wishes,
    --
    Peewiglet
     
  9. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 10:49:29 +0100, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >--
    >Just a fake guitar player in the Monkees of life.


    Guitar, eh?? What sort of guitar(s)?



    Best wishes,
    --
    Peewiglet (acoustic guitar lover)
     
  10. In article <[email protected]>,
    Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I'd be interested what others consider a practical amount of fluids to
    > carry when out on the hills. I guess that I tend to carry more than
    > most, but would value some form of benchmark. I suspect that not many
    > people follow the common 1 litre per hour guideline.


    > I'd usually carry a 2 litre platypus for an up to 8 hourr outing plus a
    > spare 750ml bottle 'emergency rations'. For longer days I'd tend to
    > add a second 2l platypus - with a noticeable weight penalty.


    > While on the subject, when wild camping (and I haven't for a few years)
    > I used to rely on water purification tablets (unless I could find a
    > spring). This though left an aftertaste that wasn't brilliant for
    > cooking and far worse for drinking the following day. What is the
    > current 'good practice' for getting a safe water supply while on
    > extended trips?


    I usually carry 2 1l Platypuses (Platypi?), one in each sidepacket of my
    backpack, with a drinking tube from one of them. If I empty that one, I
    swap them over. On a longer walk (20miles, 6hrs) I can often just about
    finish the 2l but over a shprter walk (10miles, 3hrs) I drink about
    0.75l. On a hot day I can drink more, but as I generally walk on the
    South Downs, there isn't anywhere I can fill my Platypus from so rely on
    water points on the South Downs Way.

    Andrew

    --
    +----------------------------------------+---------------------------------+
    | Andrew Conroy, Owl-Art Un-Ltd. | email: [email protected] |
    | Coming to you on an Acorn RiscPC SA110 | Snail: 58 Newland Road, |
    | | Worthing, |
    | 'OwlArt' on IRC (ZFC A) | West Sussex. U.K. |
    +----------------------------------------+---------------------------------+
    The impossible I can do at once, miracles take a little longer!!
     
  11. MIB

    MIB Guest

    Hello to all

    Firstly, I like reading through the NG it has been a great guide for myself.

    Interesting reading - comments on hydration.

    I was in Iraq last year as part of the British Forces on Op Telic 1. I
    didnt have a physical workload but was drinking approx 10 litres a day and
    probably peeing about twice. We had a fair amount of information regarding
    hydration prior to leaving the UK and it's only on arriving there and
    feeling the heat that you realise that you have to take a lot of water
    onboard.

    I was on Striding edge on Monday with my wife - I carried 3.5 litres for
    both of us and by the time we got back to the car we had drank it all.

    I'm amazed at how little water that some folk are taking with them on tough
    days out.


    Dave (MIB)
    from Co. Durham
    ________________________
    http://www.daveritchie.com

    "Mark Thompson" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > >> In the UK a pint per day is IMO a bit OTT.

    > >
    > > Two cups of tea over breakfast and you're already there!

    >
    > You need to change pubs - your landlord has been cheating you out of an
    > awful lot of beer. I hate to think what he uses when you ask for a half -
    > a port glass?! :)
     
  12. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    Peewiglet <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:p[email protected]:

    [...]
    >
    > In combination, the bottle and flask probably come to a bit more than
    > a litre. I'm aware that I should drink more water, but it's a weight
    > thing...
    >


    Thanks Roger & PW.

    I'm sure I'm carrying more water than I really need, but as I always manage
    to empty whatever I've got I'm never sure what I should aim for. I do run
    hot and perspire somewhat (OK, sweat like a pig with fever) which probbaly
    means I need a greater than average intake but I suspect that I am still
    over the top.

    It was getting that balance between weight and fluid intake that was behind
    the orignal question.

    Darren

    (carrying too much weight, both under the skin and in the pack, has got a
    lot to do with all of this)
     
  13. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    John Laird <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 08:05:02 +0100, Roger <[email protected]>
    > wrote:
    >
    >>The message <[email protected]>
    >>from Darren G <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >>

    [...]
    >
    > Off to tackle Scafell/Scafell Pike/Great End on Saturday. With the
    > forecast being for some high temperatures, I'll be carrying 2l and
    > will drink plenty before starting out. But then I sweat copiously on
    > serious walks. I have always drunk at least 1l even on shorter
    > outings. It's not a force of habit - at home I can get one from end
    > of the day to the other on two cups of tea if too busy to stop.


    A man after my own physiology! But I'm sure there is a bit of catch 22
    here - I carry extra fluids because I sweat a lot, and the weight of the
    extra fluid I'm carrying means i sweat even more ...

    I guess it's trying to find the happy medium. In the meatime I'll
    continue to resemble a mobile bowser :)

    D
     
  14. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    Simon Caldwell <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > I take a 1 litre water bottle, which I refill from streams. If in
    > very dry terrain where this isn't possible I'll carry a 2l platypus in
    > addition, eg Cuillin Ridge, Sahara Desert ;-)
    >


    what's your criteria for a 'clean' stream? do you purify it?

    It's probably due to several years working in the water industry analysing
    the levels of anamial by-products, bacteria and pesticides present in water
    (and that's drinking water), but I tend to be a little hesitant about
    filling up from streams
     
  15. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    Roger <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > The message <[email protected]>
    > from "KRO" <[email protected]> contains these words:
    >
    >
    > After a weekend away I am usually 3 or 4lbs lighter but will put
    > almost all back on within 24 hours.


    Did a 30 mile charity walk around Coniston earlier in the year, and came
    back getting on for half a stone lighter.

    unfortunately, as you say, most of it reappeared after a few drinks :(
     
  16. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Darren G wrote:
    >>I suspect that
    >> not many people follow the common 1 litre per hour guideline.

    > I'd never come across it, and I certainly never drink that much. I


    I doubt anybody does! But a lot of web sites and even IIRC this month's
    Trail (or TGO?) has it in somewhere.

    [...]

    > Best thing is just to camp by fresh water! Boiling will kill anything
    > naughty but of course it (and iodine etc.) won't remove toxins as
    > they're not alive to start with. You may wish to consider a filter,
    > but I don't bother where I go.


    rather not - all the ones I've seen are pretty heavy.

    [...]
    > The thought of 10 litres to drink over a long day in Scotland has my
    > bladder in a panic!


    That's why they invented bushes.

    10 litres is, of course, perfectly OK though in the local hostelry when you
    get back!

    Darren
     
  17. On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 22:12:32 +0100, John Laird <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    | On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 21:12:38 +0100, Simon Caldwell
    | <[email protected]> wrote:
    |
    | >On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 14:07:27 +0100, Dave Fawthrop
    | ><[email protected]> wrote:
    | >
    | >>In the UK a pint per day is IMO a bit OTT.
    | >
    | >I don't drink much, but was told recently by a doctor that you should
    | >drink 2-3 pints per day on a 'normal' (ie inactive) day, considerably
    | >more if you're exercising. Most people are dehydrated most of the
    | >time, and this is one cause for the high sales of aspirin and the
    | >like.
    |
    | A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you count
    | the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people are
    | dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been round
    | this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time, iirc).
    | Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an animal
    | that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is somehow
    | dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for extreme
    | exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.

    Simon Caldwell oversnipped my post I wrote:

    | >>So that was 1 litre per *day*, and I never suffered any ill effects.
    in extremly hot and humid conditions
    | >>In the UK a pint per day is IMO a bit OTT.

    Peeing dark brown urine is hardly an ill effect.

    Dave F
     
  18. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Darren G wrote:

    > rather not - all the ones I've seen are pretty heavy.


    But if you're carrying an extra 2 litres of water that's an extra 2 Kg
    for a lot of the day. I've never seen a portable backpacking filter
    that weighs that much.
    But, as I said, I don't use one, or puritabs. Upland streams should be
    safe to drink out of and exceptions should be self evident.

    > That's why they invented bushes.


    I don't have any problems taking a leak in the wild, but doing it the
    number of times that would be needed if you drank a litre an hour...

    > 10 litres is, of course, perfectly OK though in the local hostelry when you
    > get back!


    I'd be more than happy with a couple before moving onto shorts...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  19. KRO

    KRO Guest

    "Simon Caldwell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 09:32:33 +0000 (UTC), "KRO" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >You can tell by the colour of your (cough) urine

    >
    > you really should see someone about that, anything more than a bit of
    > phlegm is a cause for concern...
    >

    Phlegm in my urine? Not me who should be seeing someone :)
    It's perfectly normal for urine to be darker if not drinking a lot of water.

    KRO
     
  20. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    Peewiglet <[email protected]> wrote
    >On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 12:06:21 +0100, Roger <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >[...]
    >>After a weekend away I am usually 3 or 4lbs lighter

    >
    >!!! Is it too late for me to head for the Lakes tomorrow evening??
    > :)
    >
    >>but will put almost
    >>all back on within 24 hours.

    >
    >Oh... :-(
    >
    >
    > ;-)
    >

    It's called "Dehydration".
    --
    Gordon
     
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