Water water ...

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Darren G, Aug 4, 2004.

  1. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    Dave Fawthrop <[email protected]> wrote

    >Peeing dark brown urine is hardly an ill effect.
    >

    Unless it's caused by blood.
    <Faints>
    --
    Gordon
     


  2. KRO

    KRO Guest

    "Simon Caldwell" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Thu, 5 Aug 2004 09:32:33 +0000 (UTC), "KRO" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >You can tell by the colour of your (cough) urine

    >
    > you really should see someone about that, anything more than a bit of
    > phlegm is a cause for concern...
    >

    Oh dear, got you now :)

    KRO
     
  3. Brian

    Brian Guest

    Peter Clinch <[email protected]> wrote in
    news:[email protected]:

    > Darren G wrote:
    >
    >> rather not - all the ones I've seen are pretty heavy.

    >
    > But if you're carrying an extra 2 litres of water that's an extra 2 Kg
    > for a lot of the day. I've never seen a portable backpacking filter
    > that weighs that much.



    Ahhh, but how about powdered water?

    Just add water!

    Seriously I don't think it is really necessary to carry 2L of water around,
    the most I've taken is 1 and a half (1 litre fruit juice, half litre flask
    with hot drink) Even then I didn't drink it all.

    What I try to do is make sure I drink plenty at breakfast, and again when I
    return from the walk - that way I don't seem to need to drink as much
    throughout the day.

    regards

    --
    Brian
     
  4. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Brian wrote:

    > Seriously I don't think it is really necessary to carry 2L of water around,


    Quite agree, but the OP is sometimes taking 4, so in that case a filter
    may represent a saving if the reason to carry so much is a distrust of
    the supply on the hill.

    Only time I'll fill a 2 litre plat is if it's (a) very hot and (b) I'm
    away from resupply for a fair bit of time. A long crossing in the sea
    kayak or a long ridge, for example. I did carry about 3l in the Grand
    Canyon and we filtered the resupplies, but that is a desert!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  5. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Fri, 6 Aug 2004 07:12:07 +0000 (UTC), [email protected] (Chris
    Malcolm) wrote:

    >I think the problem is that in evolutionary terms doctors have only
    >recently been invented, and people can't cope with medical
    >advice. Just look at what happened, for example, when doctors started
    >telling women what to feed babies with, how often, how to give birth,
    >etc..


    Indeed. Perhaps the most remarkable observation about that phenomenon is
    that women took it. I can't get a woman to agree with anything I suggest...

    --
    Try to look unimportant; the bad guys may be low on ammo.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  6. John Laird

    John Laird Guest

    On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 22:26:25 +0100, Simon Caldwell
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Thu, 05 Aug 2004 22:12:32 +0100, John Laird
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>
    >>A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you count
    >>the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people are
    >>dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been round
    >>this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time, iirc).
    >>Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an animal
    >>that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is somehow
    >>dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for extreme
    >>exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.

    >
    >I can't argue with any of that, I was just repeating what I was told
    >by someone I'd expect to know.


    Pinch of salt time ?

    >Though millions of years of evolution have certainly led to an animal
    >that voluntarily dehydrates itself by use of alcohol ;-)


    Well, if the effect was immediate I suspect we would have learnt our lesson.

    --
    Don't steal. The government hates competition.

    Mail john rather than nospam...
     
  7. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 16:40:58 +0100, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    [...]
    >Indeed. Perhaps the most remarkable observation about that phenomenon is
    >that women took it. I can't get a woman to agree with anything I suggest...


    Oh, I dunno... I think that's a bit harsh!

    ;-)


    Best wishes,
    --
    Peewiglet
     
  8. Peewiglet

    Peewiglet Guest

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 16:37:50 +0100, John Laird
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>>--
    >>>Just a fake guitar player in the Monkees of life.


    >>Guitar, eh?? What sort of guitar(s)?


    >Best ask the compiler of my random sig file collection, not me ;-)


    Ah, well...


    Best wishes,
    --
    Peewiglet
     
  9. John Laird wrote:

    > A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you count
    > the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people are
    > dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been round
    > this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time, iirc).
    > Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an animal
    > that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is somehow
    > dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for extreme
    > exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.


    But there's surely a difference between 'needing' water & benefiting in
    a measurable way (in terms of health, concentration or whatever) from
    drinking more water?

    Bernie
     
  10. Chris Malcolm wrote:

    > Exactly. Carry more water, sweat more, drink more, empty all bottles
    > during walk, read a magazine article about dehydration causing brain
    > damage, carry more water next time, sweat even more, etc..
    >
    > I used to take a kid on hill walks who felt the same way about
    > chocolate. If he managed to finish his supply on a walk, that meant he
    > might be risking chocolate deficiency, so he'd bring more on the next
    > walk. He thought that sore legs and shortness of breath were a sign of
    > chocolate deficiency, and sure enough, every time he sat down and ate
    > a bar of chocolate his legs felt better and he stopped panting.


    I doubt anyone ever died, or even felt slightly ill, from lack of chocolate.

    Bernie
     
  11. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 19:52:05 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I doubt anyone ever died, or even felt slightly ill, from lack of chocolate.


    Hm? You must be male.
     
  12. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Judith" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 19:52:05 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >I doubt anyone ever died, or even felt slightly ill, from lack of chocolate.

    >
    > Hm? You must be male.


    From a vague recollection of a book I vaguely recall reading:

    "Chocolate stores well, and can be kept for periods of up to ten minutes in a
    locked refrigerator, provided there are no women or children in the house."
    --
    Mark South: World Citizen, Net Denizen
     
  13. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest

    I tend to spend a lot of time on lower ground and in the glens so as
    long as I have something to transpoort the water from the burn to lips
    I am usually happy.

    In hot dry places I never seem to carry enough and love the
    convenience of those 2 litre PET bottles...

    Richard Webb
     
  14. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest

    On 6 Aug 2004 00:00:16 GMT, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Simon Caldwell <[email protected]> wrote in
    >news:[email protected]:
    >
    >> I take a 1 litre water bottle, which I refill from streams. If in
    >> very dry terrain where this isn't possible I'll carry a 2l platypus in
    >> addition, eg Cuillin Ridge, Sahara Desert ;-)
    >>

    >
    >what's your criteria for a 'clean' stream? do you purify it?
    >
    >It's probably due to several years working in the water industry analysing
    >the levels of anamial by-products, bacteria and pesticides present in water
    >(and that's drinking water), but I tend to be a little hesitant about
    >filling up from streams


    Well taps are rare in most glens (clearances you know) and its bloody
    nice water.... After 25 years I am due a lurgy - so I am up on the
    game now...

    After 16 years of poisoned tap water in the English Midlands, I prefer
    to take my chance with the burns...

    Richard Webb
     
  15. On Fri, 06 Aug 2004 23:28:18 GMT, [email protected] (RJ Webb)
    wrote:

    | I tend to spend a lot of time on lower ground and in the glens so as
    | long as I have something to transpoort the water from the burn to lips
    | I am usually happy.
    |
    | In hot dry places I never seem to carry enough and love the
    | convenience of those 2 litre PET bottles...

    Remember that in WWII soldiers in the northern parts Sahara desert survived
    on one pint of water per day.

    Dave F
     
  16. Dave Fawthrop wrote:

    > Remember that in WWII soldiers in the northern parts Sahara desert survived
    > on one pint of water per day.


    I doubt they enjoyed the experience very much.

    In any case, what you can 'survive' on is hardly relevant. The aim is to
    enjoy the walk surely? How many people set out for a day on the hill
    with the sole intention of surviving?

    Bernie
     
  17. Judith wrote:

    >>I doubt anyone ever died, or even felt slightly ill, from lack of chocolate.

    >
    >
    > Hm? You must be male.


    Admittedly. Nor do I have a sweet tooth; it's always difficult to
    understand addiction from the outside :)

    Bernie
     
  18. On Sat, 07 Aug 2004 09:12:35 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    | Dave Fawthrop wrote:
    |
    | > Remember that in WWII soldiers in the northern parts Sahara desert survived
    | > on one pint of water per day.
    |
    | I doubt they enjoyed the experience very much.
    |
    | In any case, what you can 'survive' on is hardly relevant. The aim is to
    | enjoy the walk surely? How many people set out for a day on the hill
    | with the sole intention of surviving?

    I do not like carrying heavy stuff, like 2 litres of water on my back when
    I can comfortably walk all day in the UK on a fraction of that.

    Dave F
     
  19. Gordon

    Gordon Guest

    John Laird <nospam[email protected]> wrote

    > I can't get a woman to agree with anything I suggest...
    >

    I find that a couple of drinks whilst watching a romantic comedy
    together usually makes any suggestions unnecessary.....
    ;-)
    --
    Gordon
     
  20. Adam Lea

    Adam Lea Guest

    "Chris Malcolm" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > Bernie Hughes <[email protected]> writes:
    >
    > >John Laird wrote:

    >
    > >> A fluid intake of 2-3 pints is not that hard to achieve, assuming you

    count
    > >> the water content of most food too. However, to say that most people

    are
    > >> dehydrated most of the time is frankly ridiculous, and we have been

    round
    > >> this argument before (started with the 8 glasses a day last time,

    iirc).
    > >> Millions of years of evolution are not likely to have resulted in an

    animal
    > >> that drinks when it is thirsty, doesn't when it isn't, and yet is

    somehow
    > >> dehydrated. Only athletes need to plan ahead and compensate for

    extreme
    > >> exertion. The rest of us need only drink when we feel the need.

    >
    > >But there's surely a difference between 'needing' water & benefiting in
    > >a measurable way (in terms of health, concentration or whatever) from
    > >drinking more water?

    >
    > Well, if there is, why hasn't evolution, which is very good at that
    > kind of thing, found these benefits and adjusted our thirst machinery?
    > Water isn't something recently invented by the food industry which
    > evolution hasn't had enough time to adapt to.
    >
    > On the other hand, being able to persuade people they need to buy and
    > drink as much expensively bottled water as they can glug down must be
    > a businessman's fantasy come true!
    >


    Bottled water is one of the biggest rip offs there is. What's wrong with tap
    water?

    Adam

    > --
    > Chris Malcolm [email protected] +44 (0)131 651 3445 DoD #205
    > IPAB, Informatics, JCMB, King's Buildings, Edinburgh, EH9 3JZ, UK
    > [http://www.dai.ed.ac.uk/homes/cam/]
    >
     
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