Water water ...

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Darren G, Aug 4, 2004.

  1. Dave Fawthrop wrote:
    > On Fri, 13 Aug 2004 09:36:40 +0100, "W. D. Grey"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > | In article <[email protected]>, Bernie Hughes
    > | <[email protected]> writes
    > | >> Your body will use what it needs and excrete any surplus.
    > | >
    > | >Your body will use what it's given.
    > |
    > | But if you haven't given it enough, it will take water from various
    > | vital organs causing dehydration
    >
    > After a few days *without* water
    >
    > | and darkening the colour of your urine
    >
    > which causes not other effects.
    >
    > | - not a good thing.
    >
    > Just another health scare.


    No, not a health scare. In this context, not even a health issue. The
    relevant question here is not "Can survival freaks cross the Sahara with
    only a thimble-full of pond water to drink per day?" but rather "Does
    the human body operating under stress perform better when water supply
    is plentiful?" The answer is clearly yes, and you won't find a doctor in
    the land that disagrees.

    Bernie
     


  2. On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 14:35:22 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    | No, not a health scare. In this context, not even a health issue. The
    | relevant question here is not "Can survival freaks cross the Sahara with
    | only a thimble-full of pond water to drink per day?" but rather "Does
    | the human body operating under stress perform better when water supply
    | is plentiful?" The answer is clearly yes, and you won't find a doctor in
    | the land that disagrees.

    We are posting in uk.rec.walking, note the *walking*. Not marathon
    running. fell running, 100m sprint or anything else stressful. *Walking*
    even up a Ben Nevis or Scarfell Pike is hardly in this league.

    Dave F
    --
    Dave F
     
  3. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > I'd be interested what others consider a practical amount of fluids to
    > carry when out on the hills.
    >

    Depends. Are you expecting scorching heat, or the occasional
    shower of rain? Are their any mountain streams or waterfalls on
    your route? Do you usually drink as much as you can get, or do
    you prefer not to? How long is a piece of string?
    --
    Fran
    If you need my email address please ask.
     
  4. Dave Fawthrop wrote:

    > On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 14:35:22 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > | No, not a health scare. In this context, not even a health issue. The
    > | relevant question here is not "Can survival freaks cross the Sahara with
    > | only a thimble-full of pond water to drink per day?" but rather "Does
    > | the human body operating under stress perform better when water supply
    > | is plentiful?" The answer is clearly yes, and you won't find a doctor in
    > | the land that disagrees.
    >
    > We are posting in uk.rec.walking, note the *walking*. Not marathon
    > running. fell running, 100m sprint or anything else stressful. *Walking*
    > even up a Ben Nevis or Scarfell Pike is hardly in this league.


    Perhaps hillwalking is physically a non-stressful activity in your own
    case, but whilst admiring such a level of fitness, I'd suggest you were
    in a minority, even amongst the superfit denizens of uk.rec.*walking*.

    Bernie
     
  5. On Mon, 16 Aug 2004 20:16:17 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    | Dave Fawthrop wrote:
    |
    | > On Sun, 15 Aug 2004 14:35:22 +0100, Bernie Hughes
    | > <[email protected]> wrote:
    | >
    | >
    | > | No, not a health scare. In this context, not even a health issue. The
    | > | relevant question here is not "Can survival freaks cross the Sahara with
    | > | only a thimble-full of pond water to drink per day?" but rather "Does
    | > | the human body operating under stress perform better when water supply
    | > | is plentiful?" The answer is clearly yes, and you won't find a doctor in
    | > | the land that disagrees.
    | >
    | > We are posting in uk.rec.walking, note the *walking*. Not marathon
    | > running. fell running, 100m sprint or anything else stressful. *Walking*
    | > even up a Ben Nevis or Scarfell Pike is hardly in this league.
    |
    | Perhaps hillwalking is physically a non-stressful activity in your own
    | case, but whilst admiring such a level of fitness, I'd suggest you were
    | in a minority, even amongst the superfit denizens of uk.rec.*walking*.

    Please read what I wrote!
    Follow ups are supposed to refer to the post quoted.

    --
    Dave F
     
  6. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest


    >| A few bacteria may well be a better option than oodles of chlorine &
    >| flouride :)
    >
    >We tried that until the Victorian era. The death rate was rather high.
    >
    >Dave F
    >

    A few bacteria!

    They drank raw sewage

    One of the best things about leaving the English Midlands is being rid
    of poisoned tap water

    Richard Webb
     
  7. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    >
    > >| A few bacteria may well be a better option than oodles of chlorine &
    > >| flouride :)
    > >
    > >We tried that until the Victorian era. The death rate was rather high.
    > >
    > >Dave F
    > >

    > A few bacteria!
    >
    > They drank raw sewage
    >
    > One of the best things about leaving the English Midlands is being rid
    > of poisoned tap water
    >
    > Richard Webb
    >

    hear hear

    (or in this case: here, here, it's still bloody here)

    --
    Darren
     
  8. On Thu, 19 Aug 2004 22:06:33 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:

    | In article <[email protected]>,
    | [email protected] says...
    | >
    | > >| A few bacteria may well be a better option than oodles of chlorine &
    | > >| flouride :)
    | > >
    | > >We tried that until the Victorian era. The death rate was rather high.
    | > >
    | > >Dave F
    | > >
    | > A few bacteria!
    | >
    | > They drank raw sewage

    No! it was very much diluted sewage, the risks of ingesting sewage have
    been appreciated for millennia, long before bacteria were discovered. The
    lethal *number* of bacteria for one of the water born diseases, IIRC
    Cholera, is only *ten*.

    | > One of the best things about leaving the English Midlands is being rid
    | > of poisoned tap water

    To call anything "poisoned" one must demonstrate *actual* *harm* this does
    not exist. There have been many studies of sickness rates among
    populations. The risks of drinking our (Shelf/Bradford) fabulous water
    straight off the peat moors is actually high, because of the risk of heart
    disease.

    --
    Dave F
     
  9. Neil Pugh

    Neil Pugh Guest

    In message <[email protected]>, Dave Fawthrop
    <[email protected]> writes
    > The risks of drinking our (Shelf/Bradford) fabulous water
    >straight off the peat moors is actually high, because of the risk of heart
    >disease.
    >

    When I was a slip of a lad I lived just down the road from Shelf (in
    Northowram). Is the tap water still turned brown by peat staining after
    heavy rain?
    --
    Neil Pugh
     
  10. On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 14:20:16 +0100, Neil Pugh <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    | In message <[email protected]>, Dave Fawthrop
    | <[email protected]> writes
    | > The risks of drinking our (Shelf/Bradford) fabulous water
    | >straight off the peat moors is actually high, because of the risk of heart
    | >disease.
    | >
    | When I was a slip of a lad I lived just down the road from Shelf (in
    | Northowram). Is the tap water still turned brown by peat staining after
    | heavy rain?

    It was up to about a year ago 8-O
    Yorkshire Water replaced the cast iron pipes with plastic, replaced the
    large open air storage reservoirs with small sealed ones. That more or
    less got rid of the peat. Better peat than Thames ?recycled? water.

    --
    Dave F
     
  11. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 14:29:07 +0100, Dave Fawthrop wrote:

    >On Fri, 20 Aug 2004 14:20:16 +0100, Neil Pugh <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >| In message <[email protected]>, Dave Fawthrop
    >| <[email protected]> writes
    >| > The risks of drinking our (Shelf/Bradford) fabulous water
    >| >straight off the peat moors is actually high, because of the risk of heart
    >| >disease.
    >| >
    >| When I was a slip of a lad I lived just down the road from Shelf (in
    >| Northowram). Is the tap water still turned brown by peat staining after
    >| heavy rain?
    >
    >It was up to about a year ago 8-O
    >Yorkshire Water replaced the cast iron pipes with plastic, replaced the
    >large open air storage reservoirs with small sealed ones. That more or
    >less got rid of the peat. Better peat than Thames ?recycled? water.


    You can say that again. I'll only drink my tapwater if it has been in
    the fridge a while. If it is warmer I can't stand the taste. Mind you
    it does funny things when you freeze it too. I get chalky flakes
    coming out of ice cubes as they melt. My parent's tap water (South
    south south Yorkshire - walk 25m and you are in Derbyshire) tastes
    like nectar in comparison.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
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