Waterford seatpost

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Steve Braun, Apr 23, 2003.

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  1. Steve Braun

    Steve Braun Guest

    Has anyone tried using a 27.2mm seatpost in a Waterford frame that was designed for 27.4mm
    seatposts? Did you need a shim make this combination work?

    Thanks

    Steve Braun Tucson
     
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  2. sjbraun-<< Has anyone tried using a 27.2mm seatpost in a Waterford frame that was designed for
    27.4mm seatposts? Did you need a shim make this combination work?

    No shim for .2mm afaik...use a 27.4, don't use a 27.2mm-

    Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
    (303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
     
  3. Mike

    Mike Guest

    Steve: Would strongly encourage you to look for a 27.4; they come up on Ebay occasionally. I know
    Thomsom makes/made one. In the mean time you may be able to make do with an aluminum soda can shim
    (Hey, it worked for Greg Lemond in that most famous of TDF finishes!). Why they ever went 27.4 we'll
    never know, but apparently they thought better of it eventually. Good luck.

    [email protected] (Steve Braun) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > Has anyone tried using a 27.2mm seatpost in a Waterford frame that was designed for 27.4mm
    > seatposts? Did you need a shim make this combination work?
    >
    > Thanks
    >
    > Steve Braun Tucson
     
  4. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > "Steve Braun" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > news:[email protected]...
    > > Has anyone tried using a 27.2mm seatpost in a Waterford frame that was designed for 27.4mm
    > > seatposts? Did you need a shim make this combination work?

    "Trevor Taylor" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Waterford advertises seat posts on their website. If the page is up-to-date...
    > http://www.waterfordbikes.com/as/asframe.htm

    Many LBS [like us!] stock various brands of 27.4 as well.

    (And I agree with the crowd that you should get the right size and not shim
    it.)
    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  5. Todd Kuzma

    Todd Kuzma Guest

    Mike wrote:

    > Why they ever went 27.4 we'll never know, but apparently they thought better of it eventually.

    They used a thinner-walled 853 seatmast. It's plenty strong and saves a little bit of weight. Their
    frames now use a
    27.2 post, but even during the days of the 27.4 post on the 1200 and 2200 frames, they would build
    for 27.2 upon request.

    Todd Kuzma Heron Bicycles Tullio's Big Dog Cyclery LaSalle, IL 815-223-1776
    http://www.heronbicycles.com http://www.tullios.com
     
  6. Bfd

    Bfd Guest

    "Todd Kuzma" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Mike wrote:
    >
    >
    > > Why they ever went 27.4 we'll never know, but apparently they thought better of it eventually.
    >
    > They used a thinner-walled 853 seatmast. It's plenty strong and saves a little bit of weight.
    > Their frames now use a
    > 27.2 post, but even during the days of the 27.4 post on the 1200 and 2200 frames, they would build
    > for 27.2 upon request.
    >
    Does this mean that Waterford is now using a "heavier" seat tube to accomodate 27.2 seat post?
     
  7. Todd Kuzma

    Todd Kuzma Guest

    bfd wrote:

    > "Todd Kuzma" <[email protected]> wrote in message:
    >
    >>Mike wrote:
    >>
    >>>Why they ever went 27.4 we'll never know, but apparently they thought better of it eventually.
    >>>
    >>They used a thinner-walled 853 seatmast. It's plenty strong and saves a little bit of weight.
    >>Their frames now use a
    >>27.2 post, but even during the days of the 27.4 post on the 1200 and 2200 frames, they would build
    >> for 27.2 upon request.
    >>
    > Does this mean that Waterford is now using a "heavier" seat tube to accomodate 27.2 seat post?

    That's my guess. The advantage of saving a small amount weight was likely outweighed by the
    advantage of using a more conventional seatpost size.

    Todd Kuzma Heron Bicycles Tullio's Big Dog Cyclery LaSalle, IL 815-223-1776
    http://www.heronbicycles.com http://www.tullios.com
     
  8. A Muzi

    A Muzi Guest

    > > Mike wrote:
    > > > Why they ever went 27.4 we'll never know, but apparently they thought better of it eventually.

    > "Todd Kuzma" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > > They used a thinner-walled 853 seatmast. It's plenty strong and saves a little bit of weight.
    > > Their frames now use a
    > > 27.2 post, but even during the days of the 27.4 post on the 1200 and 2200 frames, they would
    > > build for 27.2 upon request.

    "bfd" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > Does this mean that Waterford is now using a "heavier" seat tube to accomodate 27.2 seat post?

    "Heavier"? "Standard"? It's all semantics isn't it? For a hundred years or so, a 28.6 outer diamter
    with a 25.4 post was "standard". Among Reynolds and similar frames, 27.2 seatposts have been the
    'standard" gauge for some forty plus years. Tangential to the concurrent discussion about
    "improvements", Waterford's designers were able to shave a few grams with impunity by going to 27.4
    seatposts. Here, we thought that was reasonable. But apparently there was a crowd of whiners such
    that Waterford relented.

    I recall the first time I saw a 27.4 - a BobJackson Lugano time trial bike - and thinking that was a
    clever way to drop a tad of metal. But I was young and impressionable.

    --
    Andrew Muzi http://www.yellowjersey.org Open every day since 1 April 1971
     
  9. Tim McNamara

    Tim McNamara Guest

    A local frame builder states that (in his opinion) seatposts used standard 28.6 mm seat tubes
    *should* be 27.4 mm. His contention is that the seat tube wall thickness is typically .6 mm at the
    top- do the math (28.6 - 1.2 = 27.4), and the seat post *should be* 27.4 mm.

    Why aren't they on most bikes built with standard steel tubing? Because (according to this guy) most
    builders are sloppy and overheat the seat cluster, distorting the metal. They end up only reaming
    the tube to 27.2 to avoid thin spots in the distorted lug/tube.

    His seat tubes always take a 27.4 mm post. In fact, you have to already have a 27.4 mm seatpost or
    buy one from him, because he really hates people cranking down the pinch bolt to make a 27.2 work.
     
  10. Bob Denton

    Bob Denton Guest

    Will a vacuum pump allow me to pump up my tires with a vacuum? That ought to be lighter than
    hydrogen and eliminate the fire hazard.

    Are there any vacuum frame pumps made?

    cya Bob Denton Gulf Stream International Delray Beach, Florida www.sinkthestink.com Manufacturers of
    Sink the Stink
     
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