Waterproof gear.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by John Smith, Jun 6, 2003.

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  1. John Smith

    John Smith Guest

    After getting absolutely p***** wet through on the way to work this morning, I have decided that I
    have to invest in the following:

    A) A decent pair of waterproof cycling shoes/mtb trainers
    B) A pair of waterproof/breathable trousers.

    So, seeing as there seems to be quite a few helpful people in this ng, I thought I would turn to you
    all for recommendations!

    Cheers, John
     
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  2. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    John Smith wrote:
    > After getting absolutely p***** wet through on the way to work this morning, I have decided that I
    > have to invest in the following:
    >
    > A) A decent pair of waterproof cycling shoes/mtb trainers

    I actually like Shimano SD60s in the wet. They're not at *all* waterproof, being sandals, but after
    my feet get wet they dry straight back out. Obviously this entails no socks and isn't terribly
    practical in the winter, but I find it much easier than trying to keep everything dry in a downpour.

    Actual waterproof ones, Shimano do something like walking boots which will keep out the water but
    like most waterproof stuff will keep things cooking in warmer weather. But great in winter.

    Another option is waterproof socks, such as Sealskinz, and though they'll keep your feet *dry* they
    won't necessarily be warm in winter if the shoe is soaked through. To stop that, neoprene overshioes
    work pretty well.

    > B) A pair of waterproof/breathable trousers.
    >
    > So, seeing as there seems to be quite a few helpful people in this ng, I thought I would turn to
    > you all for recommendations!

    Nothing "breathable" is breathable enough IME, so unless it's really chucking it down I don't bother
    (tracksters dry out really fast). When it is stair-rods and I want to turn up dry I use a pair of
    Mountain Equipment's "Drilite Plus" overtrousers with full side zips. They're light and stow easily.

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  3. Tim Woodall

    Tim Woodall Guest

    On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 11:48:39 +0000 (UTC), John Smith <[email protected]> wrote:
    > After getting absolutely p***** wet through on the way to work this morning, I have decided that I
    > have to invest in the following:
    >
    > A) A decent pair of waterproof cycling shoes/mtb trainers
    I use neoprene overshoes. They seem to keep my shoes dry.

    > B) A pair of waterproof/breathable trousers.
    >
    At this time of year I use lycra cycling shorts. In very heavy rain I will make sure my socks are
    pushed down as far as possible as they tend to wick water into my shoes.

    Regards,

    Tim.

    p.s. It was nice and cool with a very light drizzle for me this morning. I was actually less wet
    (with sweat) than I often am :-D

    --
    God said, "div D = rho, div B = 0, curl E = - @B/@t, curl H = J + @D/@t," and there was light.

    http://tjw.hn.org/ http://www.locofungus.btinternet.co.uk/
     
  4. Paul Kelly

    Paul Kelly Guest

    "Tim Woodall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >
    > At this time of year I use lycra cycling shorts. In very heavy rain I will make sure my socks are
    > pushed down as far as possible as they tend to wick water into my shoes.

    Reminds me of the fist time i wore my Crissie present Sealskin waterproof socks. Wore them over my
    stirrup footed long lycra legs. Doh! Got home and poured half a pint of water out of each sock!

    pk
     
  5. Jim Price

    Jim Price Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > John Smith wrote:
    >
    >> After getting absolutely p***** wet through on the way to work this morning, I have decided that
    >> I have to invest in the following:
    >>
    >> A) A decent pair of waterproof cycling shoes/mtb trainers

    > Actual waterproof ones, Shimano do something like walking boots which will keep out the water but
    > like most waterproof stuff will keep things cooking in warmer weather. But great in winter.

    That'll be the FR80's. I've got a pair, but they are only as good as whatever stops the water
    running down your legs from getting into them. I don't actually find them too hot in summer, though.

    >> B) A pair of waterproof/breathable trousers.
    >>
    > Nothing "breathable" is breathable enough IME
    I'd agree with that. I just use cheap nylon overtrousers with mesh lining, and I've added fasteners
    so I can wrap them around the top of my shoes. I've never tried the overshoes.

    Jim Price
     
  6. Frank

    Frank Guest

    "Peter Clinch" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
    > John Smith wrote:
    > > After getting absolutely p***** wet through on the way to work this
    morning,
    > > I have decided that I have to invest in the following:
    > >
    > > A) A decent pair of waterproof cycling shoes/mtb trainers
    >
    > I actually like Shimano SD60s in the wet. They're not at *all* waterproof, being sandals, but
    > after my feet get wet they dry straight back out. Obviously this entails no socks and isn't
    > terribly practical in the winter, but I find it much easier than trying to keep everything dry in
    > a downpour.
    >
    > Actual waterproof ones, Shimano do something like walking boots which will keep out the water but
    > like most waterproof stuff will keep things cooking in warmer weather. But great in winter.
    >
    SD60's with neoprene overshoes are fine in winter. A little cold to walk in when the snow was
    stinging my eyes too much to ride but fine for riding.
     
  7. Will Plummer

    Will Plummer Guest

    I wouldn`t bother - as previously posted, most "breathable" stuff just isn`t up to the job and
    you`ll be just as wet from sweat condensing on the inside as you would be if you just wore your
    regular gear.

    Best get something that dries quick while you are at work and pack a dry set of clothes on the rack.
    Towel too.

    You will get wet. Learn to love it (in the summer anyway!).

    If it`s really sheeting down - get a bus/cab - you`ll still be well ahead financially of those who
    drive in every day.
     
  8. On Fri, 6 Jun 2003 11:48:39 +0000 (UTC), "John Smith" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >After getting absolutely p***** wet through on the way to work this morning, I have decided that I
    >have to invest in the following:
    >
    >A) A decent pair of waterproof cycling shoes/mtb trainers
    >B) A pair of waterproof/breathable trousers.
    >
    >So, seeing as there seems to be quite a few helpful people in this ng, I thought I would turn to
    >you all for recommendations!
    >
    >Cheers, John
    >
    >

    If you're a lycra commuter don't bother with waterproofs; take a towel. Alternatively if you, like
    me, ride in working garb then there's plenty available that does duty for short commutes.

    I've got an old Sprayway mountaineering jacket with capacious hood. Just need to be a bit wary when
    turning head to look around; there's the danger of getting a less than panoramic view of the
    interior of the hood. Legs get covered by Altura trousers and shoes with Altura over-shoes. I forget
    the exact lines but, IME, Altura's pretty good.

    For 4 or 5 miles this lot (+ gloves) will keep you bone dry in even the most torrential downpours.
    Much above 7 miles and water starts to find it's way in and the limitations of breathability
    become apparent.

    Incidentally, while breathable fabrics have their limits they are much better than the
    non-breathable stuff. Whenever I resort to the old stuff I really notice the boil-in-the-bag effect
    kicking in.

    The only issue I have with this set up is that it's a tad on the bulky side - particularly
    the jacket.
     
  9. Andymorris

    Andymorris Guest

    [Not Responding] wrote:
    > If you're a lycra commuter don't bother with waterproofs; take a towel.

    I do this with a travel towel I got from a Rohan shop "LifeVenture TrekTowel" It was pricy, around
    £25, but its very big, folds down to about 8" * 3" * 1", dries me very well, and dries itself when
    hung in the coat cupboard at work.

    --
    Andy Morris

    AndyAtJinkasDotFreeserve.Co.UK

    Love this: Put an end to Outlook Express's messy quotes
    http://home.in.tum.de/~jain/software/oe-quotefix/
     
  10. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    [Not Responding] wrote:
    :> If you're a lycra commuter don't bother with waterproofs; take a towel.

    I think it just depends how long your commute is.

    For riding to work (2 miles) I wear whatever I'm wearing at work that day (anything from jeans +
    t-shirt to a suit). If it's wet I have a cheapish Endura yellow/fluro jacket (60 squid) and some
    very cheap waterproof trousers from Millets.

    I either wear boots or (if I have to wear smart shoes) take them in the bag.

    That keeps me dry for the ride to work.

    OTOH, for "proper" rides, I never wear waterproof bottoms. I have a Gore PacLite jacket. It fits
    into a jersey pocket, is completely waterproof, weighs nothing and breathes excellently. It also
    cost 160 squids....

    So if your commute is long enough for you to bother wearing "proper" cycling gear (lycra shorts etc)
    then your choice of waterproofs will be rather different.

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org Power is delightful. Absolute power is absolutely delightful -
    Lord Lester
     
  11. .

    . Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Arthur Clune <[email protected]> writes
    >: [Not Responding] wrote:
    >:> If you're a lycra commuter don't bother with waterproofs; take a towel.
    >
    >I think it just depends how long your commute is.
    >
    >For riding to work (2 miles) I wear whatever I'm wearing at work that day (anything from jeans +
    >t-shirt to a suit). If it's wet I have a cheapish Endura yellow/fluro jacket (60 squid) and some
    >very cheap waterproof trousers from Millets.

    You forgot to mention the shorts!
    >
    >I either wear boots or (if I have to wear smart shoes) take them in the bag.
    >
    >That keeps me dry for the ride to work.
    >
    >OTOH, for "proper" rides, I never wear waterproof bottoms. I have a Gore PacLite jacket. It fits
    >into a jersey pocket, is completely waterproof, weighs nothing and breathes excellently. It also
    >cost 160 squids....
    >
    >So if your commute is long enough for you to bother wearing "proper" cycling gear (lycra shorts
    >etc) then your choice of waterproofs will be rather different.
    >
    Sam In Cyberspace no-one can hear you scream...
     
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