Watership Down 15th Jan



A

Alan Holmes

Guest
"MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
>
> John B wrote:
>> Mike K Smith wrote:
>>
>> > John B wrote On 12/08/05 17:16,:
>> >
>> > > Popham is indeed a nice stop - its just up the road from me -
>> > > Whitchurch
>> > > is even closer ;-)
>> > > We often trundle out for a mug of tea and cake.
>> > > It is an airfield with a small and friendly cafe which has the
>> > > control
>> > > 'tower' (a sectioned off desk and some dials) just inside the
>> > > doorway.
>> > >
>> > > There are *very* few restrictions and you can wander around the
>> > > aircraft
>> > > at leisure. A lot of small planes and microlights use it.
>> > >
>> > > Its one of Hampshire's several 'hidden' tea stops, but it seems the
>> > > audaxers have now found it.
>> >
>> > Sounds like a real gem. We pass fairly close to it sometimes, but I've
>> > never thought of popping in for a cuppa. What are their opening hours?
>> > I
>> > presume the answer is more or less 'during daylight'.

>>
>> From early morning 'til teatime
>> http://www.popham-airfield.co.uk/Index.htm
>>
>> Its the home of the Spitfire Club - an aircraft I'm presently designing a
>> book to :)
>>
>> The breakfasts are excellent and the atmosphere really laid back, not at
>> all
>> what you would expect from a private airfield.
>>
>> To whet your appetite:
>> http://www.popham-airfield.co.uk/Cafeteria.htm
>>
>> John B

>
> I'm now doing the RR the week before so should be on for this; would be
> nice to meet up with some other urc'ers even if not doing the 115k, I
> would estimate we'll be there sometime between 1100-1230. I'm pretty
> sure Pam still accepts entries on the line.
>


You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

Alan
 
T

Tim Hall

Guest
On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
<[email protected]> wrote:

>
>"MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>news:[email protected]
>>


>> I'm now doing the RR the week before so should be on for this; would be
>> nice to meet up with some other urc'ers even if not doing the 115k, I
>> would estimate we'll be there sometime between 1100-1230. I'm pretty
>> sure Pam still accepts entries on the line.
>>

>
>You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.



Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph. Martin
might be fast but he's no Sean Yates. And as it happens Sean Yates
posted 22.30 for a 10 mile time trial on New Years Day. That's 26.7mph
of ball busting, eyes out, heart bursting effort.

Anyway AUK rules limit you to a maximum speed of 30 kph.


Tim
 
M

MartinM

Guest
Tim Hall wrote:
> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >
> >"MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >news:[email protected]
> >>

>
> >> I'm now doing the RR the week before so should be on for this; would be
> >> nice to meet up with some other urc'ers even if not doing the 115k, I
> >> would estimate we'll be there sometime between 1100-1230. I'm pretty
> >> sure Pam still accepts entries on the line.
> >>

> >
> >You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

>
>
> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph. Martin
> might be fast but he's no Sean Yates.


well actually I'm neither; I was referring to the peleton's likely ETA
at Popham if anyone wishes to join us.
 
M

MartinM

Guest
Tim Hall wrote:
> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
> >
> >"MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> >news:[email protected]
> >>

>
> >> I'm now doing the RR the week before so should be on for this; would be
> >> nice to meet up with some other urc'ers even if not doing the 115k, I
> >> would estimate we'll be there sometime between 1100-1230. I'm pretty
> >> sure Pam still accepts entries on the line.
> >>

> >
> >You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

>
>
> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph. Martin
> might be fast but he's no Sean Yates.


well I'm neither ATM (see Poor Student thread)
I was referring to the peleton's likely ETA at Popham
 
S

Simon Brooke

Guest
in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
('[email protected]') wrote:

> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

>
> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph.


....which is faster than the Tour de France peloton averages.

--
[email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

;; For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth
;; knowledge increaseth sorrow.." - Ecclesiastes 1:18
 
J

James Annan

Guest
Simon Brooke wrote:

> in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>
>>On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
>><[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>
>>>You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

>>
>>Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph.

>
>
> ...which is faster than the Tour de France peloton averages.
>


Alan's just looking for an excuse to tell us (again) about his
record-breaking feats. Might as well let him get it over with, then
he'll go away again.

<http://groups.google.com/group/uk.transport/msg/14b961fcc2e5e23f?dmode=source>

James
--
James Annan
see web pages for email
http://www.ne.jp/asahi/julesandjames/home/
http://julesandjames.blogspot.com/
 
D

Dave Larrington

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
MartinM ([email protected]) wrote:
>
> John B wrote:
> > Mike K Smith wrote:
> >
> > > John B wrote On 12/08/05 17:16,:
> > >
> > > > Popham is indeed a nice stop - its just up the road from me - Whitchurch
> > > > is even closer ;-)
> > > > We often trundle out for a mug of tea and cake.
> > > > It is an airfield with a small and friendly cafe which has the control
> > > > 'tower' (a sectioned off desk and some dials) just inside the doorway.
> > > >
> > > > There are *very* few restrictions and you can wander around the aircraft
> > > > at leisure. A lot of small planes and microlights use it.
> > > >
> > > > Its one of Hampshire's several 'hidden' tea stops, but it seems the
> > > > audaxers have now found it.
> > >
> > > Sounds like a real gem. We pass fairly close to it sometimes, but I've
> > > never thought of popping in for a cuppa. What are their opening hours? I
> > > presume the answer is more or less 'during daylight'.

> >
> > From early morning 'til teatime
> > http://www.popham-airfield.co.uk/Index.htm
> >
> > Its the home of the Spitfire Club - an aircraft I'm presently designing a
> > book to :)
> >
> > The breakfasts are excellent and the atmosphere really laid back, not at all
> > what you would expect from a private airfield.
> >
> > To whet your appetite:
> > http://www.popham-airfield.co.uk/Cafeteria.htm
> >
> > John B

>
> I'm now doing the RR the week before so should be on for this; would be
> nice to meet up with some other urc'ers even if not doing the 115k, I
> would estimate we'll be there sometime between 1100-1230. I'm pretty
> sure Pam still accepts entries on the line.


My entry is in. But then you knew that, or at least Martin did. Anyone
else doing the Watership Down next Sunday?

--
Dave Larrington - <http://www.legslarry.beerdrinkers.co.uk/>
We had that Maurits C. Escher in to do some building work once. I
haven't been able to leave the house since.
 
A

Alan Holmes

Guest
"Tim Hall" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
> <[email protected]> wrote:
>
>>
>>"MartinM" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>>news:[email protected]
>>>

>
>>> I'm now doing the RR the week before so should be on for this; would be
>>> nice to meet up with some other urc'ers even if not doing the 115k, I
>>> would estimate we'll be there sometime between 1100-1230. I'm pretty
>>> sure Pam still accepts entries on the line.
>>>

>>
>>You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

>
>
> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph. Martin
> might be fast but he's no Sean Yates. And as it happens Sean Yates
> posted 22.30 for a 10 mile time trial on New Years Day. That's 26.7mph
> of ball busting, eyes out, heart bursting effort.


One day, many years ago, I was cycling home from work, taking my time, not
in a hurry, when a car drew up behind me and stayed there for a while, I
began to get a little angry, but the car then drew alongside me, the driver
shouted to me 'you travelling at 30 mph', I was NOT making any real effort
to break the speed limit, just taking my time, so the person talking
'bollocks' is you.

I do wonder whether the bike had anything to do with the fact that I could
cycle at a 'fast' rate, it was quite heavy, not like those which you could
pick up with your little finger.

So, the answer to being able to cycle fast, seems to be, get a heavy bike!

Alan

>
> Anyway AUK rules limit you to a maximum speed of 30 kph.
>
>
> Tim
 
A

Alan Holmes

Guest
"Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]ternal.jasmine.org.uk...
> in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>
>> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>
>>>You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.

>>
>> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph.

>
> ...which is faster than the Tour de France peloton averages.


So, what does that say about the people who join in the race?

Out of interest, when going on a hostelling holiday one year, I left home at
two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel was
closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance, it
was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph, and you should bear in
mind that I had two loaded pannier bags and a full saddle bag, which made
the bike almost impossible to lift as it was so heavy.

Alan

>
> --
> [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/
>
> ;; For in much wisdom is much grief; and he that increaseth
> ;; knowledge increaseth sorrow.." - Ecclesiastes 1:18
 
M

MartinM

Guest
Alan Holmes wrote:
> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
> news:[email protected]
> > in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
> > ('[email protected]') wrote:
> >
> >> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
> >> <[email protected]> wrote:
> >>
> >>>You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.
> >>
> >> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph.

> >
> > ...which is faster than the Tour de France peloton averages.

>
> So, what does that say about the people who join in the race?
>
> Out of interest, when going on a hostelling holiday one year, I left home at
> two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
> arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel was
> closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance, it
> was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph, and you should bear in
> mind that I had two loaded pannier bags and a full saddle bag, which made
> the bike almost impossible to lift as it was so heavy.


did you happen to pass a silver DeLorean on the way? ;-)
 
R

Richard

Guest
MartinM wrote:

>>Out of interest, when going on a hostelling holiday one year, I left home at
>>two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
>>arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel was
>>closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance, it
>>was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph, and you should bear in
>>mind that I had two loaded pannier bags and a full saddle bag, which made
>>the bike almost impossible to lift as it was so heavy.

>
>
> did you happen to pass a silver DeLorean on the way? ;-)


Great Scott!

R.
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
MartinM wrote:
> Alan Holmes wrote:
>> "Simon Brooke" <[email protected]> wrote in message
>> news:[email protected]
>>> in message <[email protected]>, Tim Hall
>>> ('[email protected]') wrote:
>>>
>>>> On Sat, 07 Jan 2006 19:29:32 GMT, "Alan Holmes"
>>>> <[email protected]> wrote:
>>>>
>>>>> You should be able to do 72 miles in about two and a half hours.
>>>>
>>>> Bollocks (tm). 72 miles in two and a half hours is 28.8 mph.
>>>
>>> ...which is faster than the Tour de France peloton averages.

>>
>> So, what does that say about the people who join in the race?
>>
>> Out of interest, when going on a hostelling holiday one year, I left
>> home at two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7
>> o'clock, when I arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone
>> waiting why the ostel was closed, and the anwser wasthat it was
>> 4.50, when I checked the distance, it was 84 miles, which meant I
>> had averaged 29.5 mph, and you should bear in mind that I had two
>> loaded pannier bags and a full saddle bag, which made the bike
>> almost impossible to lift as it was so heavy.

>
> did you happen to pass a silver DeLorean on the way? ;-)


He did, but it accelerated as he was riding past, and disappeared in a puff
of smoke.

--
Ambrose
 
D

David Martin

Guest
Alan Holmes wrote:
>
> One day, many years ago, I was cycling home from work, taking my time, not
> in a hurry, when a car drew up behind me and stayed there for a while, I
> began to get a little angry, but the car then drew alongside me, the driver
> shouted to me 'you travelling at 30 mph', I was NOT making any real effort
> to break the speed limit, just taking my time, so the person talking
> 'bollocks' is you.


Like when I was tailed by a bus in London who toild me I was doing
'nearly 40'. Simple calculation based on cadence, gear and speed
indicated that unbeknownst to me, by back wheel had near doubled in
size.

Then when I stopped to check, it had returned to it's normal size.
Maybe I should patent it..

...d
 
R

Richard

Guest
David Martin wrote:

> Like when I was tailed by a bus in London who toild me I was doing
> 'nearly 40'. Simple calculation based on cadence, gear and speed
> indicated that unbeknownst to me, by back wheel had near doubled in
> size.
>
> Then when I stopped to check, it had returned to it's normal size.
> Maybe I should patent it..


I'm afraid it's already patented, together with the device that causes
lamp batteries to drain of all charge the day before the clocks go back.

R.
 
A

Ambrose Nankivell

Guest
David Martin wrote:
> Alan Holmes wrote:
>>
>> One day, many years ago, I was cycling home from work, taking my
>> time, not in a hurry, when a car drew up behind me and stayed there
>> for a while, I began to get a little angry, but the car then drew
>> alongside me, the driver shouted to me 'you travelling at 30 mph', I
>> was NOT making any real effort to break the speed limit, just taking
>> my time, so the person talking 'bollocks' is you.

>
> Like when I was tailed by a bus in London who toild me I was doing
> 'nearly 40'. Simple calculation based on cadence, gear and speed
> indicated that unbeknownst to me, by back wheel had near doubled in
> size.


One hopes the bus [driver?] misread its speedometer, due to concentrating on
the road instead.

--
Ambrose
 
D

dkahn400

Guest
Alan Holmes wrote:

> Out of interest, when going on a hostelling holiday one year, I left home at
> two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
> arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel was
> closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance, it
> was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph, and you should bear in
> mind that I had two loaded pannier bags and a full saddle bag, which made
> the bike almost impossible to lift as it was so heavy.


You sure you didn't fall asleep on the way, and it was actually 4:50
the next day?

--
Dave...
 
M

Mark McNeill

Guest
Response to Alan Holmes:
> I left home at
> two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
> arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel was
> closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance, it
> was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph


I know what you mean; I had a bike computer like that once.


--
Mark, UK

"There is no man so good, who, were he to submit all his thoughts and
actions to the laws, would not deserve hanging ten times in his life."
 
A

Alan Holmes

Guest
"Mark McNeill" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Response to Alan Holmes:
>> I left home at
>> two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
>> arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel
>> was
>> closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance,
>> it
>> was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph

>
> I know what you mean; I had a bike computer like that once.


This was before the days of computers!

Alan

>
>
> --
> Mark, UK
>
> "There is no man so good, who, were he to submit all his thoughts and
> actions to the laws, would not deserve hanging ten times in his life."
 
A

Alan Holmes

Guest
"dkahn400" <[email protected]> wrote in message
news:[email protected]
> Alan Holmes wrote:
>
>> Out of interest, when going on a hostelling holiday one year, I left home
>> at
>> two o'clock, intending to get to the hostel at about 7 o'clock, when I
>> arrived the hostel was not open, I asked someone waiting why the ostel
>> was
>> closed, and the anwser wasthat it was 4.50, when I checked the distance,
>> it
>> was 84 miles, which meant I had averaged 29.5 mph, and you should bear in
>> mind that I had two loaded pannier bags and a full saddle bag, which made
>> the bike almost impossible to lift as it was so heavy.

>
> You sure you didn't fall asleep on the way, and it was actually 4:50
> the next day?


I sometimes pace cyclists to see what speeds they are travelling at, and
it's surprising how fast some of them travel, it's very common to pace
someone at 25 + mph

But, of course, i cannot be sure my car speedometer is really very accurate!

Alan

>
> --
> Dave...
>
 
M

MartinM

Guest
Alan Holmes wrote:


> I sometimes pace cyclists to see what speeds they are travelling at, and
> it's surprising how fast some of them travel, it's very common to pace
> someone at 25 + mph


FSVO common, the only time I see cyclists riding at that speed is on
TT's

> But, of course, i cannot be sure my car speedometer is really very accurate!


sorry to disappoint you but you did not ever ride anywhere at 29.5 mph
average; think back, reconsider the journey and it will become
apparent.