Wax on fruit

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Scharone, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Scharone

    Scharone Guest

    I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    eating wax!

    Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.

    Just wondering...

    Scharone
     
    Tags:


  2. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 20:30:55 -0600, "Scharone" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    >cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    >just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    >eating wax!
    >
    >Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >
    >Just wondering...
    >
    >Scharone
    >
    >

    Howdy,

    We wash 'em with a little soapy cold water...

    HTH,

    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
  3. Kenneth

    Kenneth Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 20:30:55 -0600, "Scharone" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    >cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    >just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    >eating wax!
    >
    >Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >
    >Just wondering...
    >
    >Scharone
    >
    >

    Howdy,

    We wash 'em with a little soapy cold water...

    HTH,

    --
    Kenneth

    If you email... Please remove the "SPAMLESS."
     
  4. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >"Scharone"
    >
    >I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    >cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    >just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    >eating wax!
    >
    >Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >
    >Just wondering...

    The wax used to coat produce is perfectly safe for human
    consumption (you'd be surprised at how much wax you injest
    in a lifetime from other sources). You can easily remove
    that wax by washing your produce in warm detergent water but
    it's hardly worth the trouble... you should be much more
    concerned about pesticides on produce. The wax coating
    indicates that the produce has been washed before it's
    application.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  5. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    >"Scharone"
    >
    >I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    >cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    >just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    >eating wax!
    >
    >Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >
    >Just wondering...

    The wax used to coat produce is perfectly safe for human
    consumption (you'd be surprised at how much wax you injest
    in a lifetime from other sources). You can easily remove
    that wax by washing your produce in warm detergent water but
    it's hardly worth the trouble... you should be much more
    concerned about pesticides on produce. The wax coating
    indicates that the produce has been washed before it's
    application.

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  6. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Scharone wrote:

    > I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    > that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    > that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit
    > in cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the
    > wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the zest,
    > we are eating wax!

    From the label on some packaged bell peppers (Amerifoods):

    "Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or shellac
    based wax or resin"

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  7. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Scharone wrote:

    > I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    > that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    > that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit
    > in cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the
    > wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the zest,
    > we are eating wax!

    From the label on some packaged bell peppers (Amerifoods):

    "Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or shellac
    based wax or resin"

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  8. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Scharone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I
    : realised that
    it looked so
    : lovely and shiny because of all the wax that covers
    : our citrus
    fruit in the
    : USA. I wash my fruit in cold water, so I'm sure that
    : doesn't
    get rid of the
    : wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the
    : zest, we
    are eating
    : wax!
    :
    : Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried
    : that and
    the lemon
    : seemed as shiny as ever.
    :
    : Just wondering...
    :
    : Scharone
    :
    : ====

    There are a couple of things that you can do...

    Warm, soapy water usually removes it/most of it or you can
    use those fruit & vegetable wash products. "Fit" is one of
    them. I use it and like it. But I use soapy water just as
    much. It's a matter of what's handy and if my hands are
    already wet or not (if they are, I don't want to spash water
    all over the cabinet reaching for the spray stuff...).
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  9. Rick & Cyndi

    Rick & Cyndi Guest

    "Scharone" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    : I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I
    : realised that
    it looked so
    : lovely and shiny because of all the wax that covers
    : our citrus
    fruit in the
    : USA. I wash my fruit in cold water, so I'm sure that
    : doesn't
    get rid of the
    : wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the
    : zest, we
    are eating
    : wax!
    :
    : Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried
    : that and
    the lemon
    : seemed as shiny as ever.
    :
    : Just wondering...
    :
    : Scharone
    :
    : ====

    There are a couple of things that you can do...

    Warm, soapy water usually removes it/most of it or you can
    use those fruit & vegetable wash products. "Fit" is one of
    them. I use it and like it. But I use soapy water just as
    much. It's a matter of what's handy and if my hands are
    already wet or not (if they are, I don't want to spash water
    all over the cabinet reaching for the spray stuff...).
    --
    Cyndi <Remove a "b" to reply
     
  10. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 20:30:55 -0600, "Scharone" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    >cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    >just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    >eating wax!
    >
    >Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.

    A wash or spray of food-grade wax is applied to apples to
    *replace* the natural waxy coating that is lost when the
    apples are washed before shipment and sale. Both the natural
    and applied varieties have something to do with reducing
    oxidation in the interior, I think. Citrus is pretty shiny
    naturally. You *could* scrub with hot water and detergent
    and a stiff brush to scuff up the shine. Cucumbers are about
    the only veg that are sometimes heavily waxed, and I usually
    peel those.
     
  11. Frogleg

    Frogleg Guest

    On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 20:30:55 -0600, "Scharone" <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    >I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit in
    >cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the wax. It
    >just seems yuk to think that along with the zest, we are
    >eating wax!
    >
    >Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.

    A wash or spray of food-grade wax is applied to apples to
    *replace* the natural waxy coating that is lost when the
    apples are washed before shipment and sale. Both the natural
    and applied varieties have something to do with reducing
    oxidation in the interior, I think. Citrus is pretty shiny
    naturally. You *could* scrub with hot water and detergent
    and a stiff brush to scuff up the shine. Cucumbers are about
    the only veg that are sometimes heavily waxed, and I usually
    peel those.
     
  12. Sueb

    Sueb Guest

    "Scharone" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    > that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    > that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit
    > in cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the
    > wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the zest,
    > we are eating wax!
    >
    > Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    > and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >

    I have my own lemon tree. I just pick them and use them so
    there's no wax involved ever.

    but...lemon skin contains a lot of oils. When you wash them,
    the oils come out. You may be washing away the wax, then
    seeing the natural oil.

    Susan B.
     
  13. Sueb

    Sueb Guest

    "Scharone" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    > that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    > that covers our citrus fruit in the USA. I wash my fruit
    > in cold water, so I'm sure that doesn't get rid of the
    > wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the zest,
    > we are eating wax!
    >
    > Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    > and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >

    I have my own lemon tree. I just pick them and use them so
    there's no wax involved ever.

    but...lemon skin contains a lot of oils. When you wash them,
    the oils come out. You may be washing away the wax, then
    seeing the natural oil.

    Susan B.
     
  14. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    > From the label on some packaged bell peppers (Amerifoods):
    >
    >"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or shellac
    >based wax or resin"

    Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).

    -sw
     
  15. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    > From the label on some packaged bell peppers (Amerifoods):
    >
    >"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or shellac
    >based wax or resin"

    Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).

    -sw
     
  16. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    Frogleg wrote in message
    <[email protected]>...
    >On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 20:30:55 -0600, "Scharone"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >>that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >>that covers our citrus fruit in
    the
    >>USA. I wash my fruit in cold water, so I'm sure that
    >>doesn't get rid of
    the
    >>wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the zest,
    >>we are eating wax!
    >>
    >>Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >>and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >
    >A wash or spray of food-grade wax is applied to apples to
    >*replace* the natural waxy coating that is lost when the
    >apples are washed before shipment and sale. Both the
    >natural and applied varieties have something to do with
    >reducing oxidation in the interior, I think. Citrus is
    >pretty shiny naturally. You *could* scrub with hot water
    >and detergent and a stiff brush to scuff up the shine.
    >Cucumbers are about the only veg that are sometimes heavily
    >waxed, and I usually peel those.

    cuckes are one of the few veggies i peel instead of scrub.
    and rutabagas. even the unwaxed organic ones. and the waxed
    ones at the stupidmarket are coated in about an inch and a
    half of wax. yeech!

    --
    Saerah

    TANSTAAFL

    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing
    swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive
    power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some
    farcical aquatic ceremony."
     
  17. Saerah

    Saerah Guest

    Frogleg wrote in message
    <[email protected]>...
    >On Thu, 11 Mar 2004 20:30:55 -0600, "Scharone"
    ><[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>I was about to zest a lemon this evening when I realised
    >>that it looked so lovely and shiny because of all the wax
    >>that covers our citrus fruit in
    the
    >>USA. I wash my fruit in cold water, so I'm sure that
    >>doesn't get rid of
    the
    >>wax. It just seems yuk to think that along with the zest,
    >>we are eating wax!
    >>
    >>Would washing it in hot water get rid of it? I tried that
    >>and the lemon seemed as shiny as ever.
    >
    >A wash or spray of food-grade wax is applied to apples to
    >*replace* the natural waxy coating that is lost when the
    >apples are washed before shipment and sale. Both the
    >natural and applied varieties have something to do with
    >reducing oxidation in the interior, I think. Citrus is
    >pretty shiny naturally. You *could* scrub with hot water
    >and detergent and a stiff brush to scuff up the shine.
    >Cucumbers are about the only veg that are sometimes heavily
    >waxed, and I usually peel those.

    cuckes are one of the few veggies i peel instead of scrub.
    and rutabagas. even the unwaxed organic ones. and the waxed
    ones at the stupidmarket are coated in about an inch and a
    half of wax. yeech!

    --
    Saerah

    TANSTAAFL

    "Strange women lying in ponds distributing
    swords is no basis for a system of government. Supreme executive
    power derives from a mandate from the masses, not from some
    farcical aquatic ceremony."
     
  18. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>From the label on some packaged bell peppers (Amerifoods):
    >>
    >>"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or shellac
    >>based wax or resin"
    >
    >
    > Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).

    Yep. It's made from secretions of the lac insect...

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  19. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>From the label on some packaged bell peppers (Amerifoods):
    >>
    >>"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or shellac
    >>based wax or resin"
    >
    >
    > Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).

    Yep. It's made from secretions of the lac insect...

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  20. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:36:32 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>From the label on some packaged bell peppers
    >>>(Amerifoods):
    >>>
    >>>"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or
    >>>shellac based wax or resin"
    >>
    >> Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).
    >
    >Yep. It's made from secretions of the lac insect...

    Are bugs (and bug byproducts) vegetarian?

    <shrug>

    -sw
     
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