Wax on fruit

Discussion in 'Food and nutrition' started by Scharone, Mar 12, 2004.

  1. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:36:32 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:
    >
    >> On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg
    >> <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>>From the label on some packaged bell peppers
    >>>(Amerifoods):
    >>>
    >>>"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or
    >>>shellac based wax or resin"
    >>
    >> Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).
    >
    >Yep. It's made from secretions of the lac insect...

    Are bugs (and bug byproducts) vegetarian?

    <shrug>

    -sw
     


  2. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:36:32 GMT, Reg
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Steve Wertz wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg
    >>><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>From the label on some packaged bell peppers
    >>>>(Amerifoods):
    >>>
    >>>>"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or
    >>>>shellac based wax or resin"
    >>>
    >>>Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).
    >>
    >>Yep. It's made from secretions of the lac insect...
    >
    >
    > Are bugs (and bug byproducts) vegetarian?
    >
    > <shrug>

    You have to wonder about this. I suppose it could be
    "synthetic" shellac. Doesn't make you feel much better about
    it though, does it?

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  3. Reg

    Reg Guest

    Steve Wertz wrote:

    > On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:36:32 GMT, Reg
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>Steve Wertz wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:15:40 GMT, Reg
    >>><[email protected]> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>>From the label on some packaged bell peppers
    >>>>(Amerifoods):
    >>>
    >>>>"Coated with vegetable, petroleum, beeswax, and/or
    >>>>shellac based wax or resin"
    >>>
    >>>Isn't shellac made from bugs? (and some waxes as well).
    >>
    >>Yep. It's made from secretions of the lac insect...
    >
    >
    > Are bugs (and bug byproducts) vegetarian?
    >
    > <shrug>

    You have to wonder about this. I suppose it could be
    "synthetic" shellac. Doesn't make you feel much better about
    it though, does it?

    --
    Reg email: RegForte (at) (that free MS email service) (dot)
    com
     
  4. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:50:43 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:

    >> Are bugs (and bug byproducts) vegetarian?
    >>
    >> <shrug>
    >
    >You have to wonder about this. I suppose it could be
    >"synthetic" shellac. Doesn't make you feel much better
    >about it though, does it?

    Nyeh. I've eaten plenty of bugs. I'm not a vegetarian,
    though. I'm sure they eat even more bugs than carnivores.

    -sw
     
  5. Steve Wertz

    Steve Wertz Guest

    On Fri, 12 Mar 2004 03:50:43 GMT, Reg <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Steve Wertz wrote:

    >> Are bugs (and bug byproducts) vegetarian?
    >>
    >> <shrug>
    >
    >You have to wonder about this. I suppose it could be
    >"synthetic" shellac. Doesn't make you feel much better
    >about it though, does it?

    Nyeh. I've eaten plenty of bugs. I'm not a vegetarian,
    though. I'm sure they eat even more bugs than carnivores.

    -sw
     
  6. Penmart01

    Penmart01 Guest

    Encyclopædia Britannica

    wax

    any of a class of pliable substances of animal, plant,
    mineral, or synthetic origin that differ from fats in being
    less greasy, harder, and more brittle and in containing
    principally compounds of high molecular weight (e.g., fatty
    acids, alcohols, and saturated hydrocarbons). Waxes share
    certain characteristic physical properties. Many of them
    melt at moderate temperatures
    (i.e., between about 35° and 100° C, or 95° and 212° F) and
    form hard films that can be polished to a high gloss,
    making them ideal for use in a wide array of polishes.
    They do share some of the same properties as fats.
    Waxes and fats, for example, are soluble in the same
    solvents and both leave grease spots on paper.

    Notwithstanding such physical similarities, animal and
    plant waxes differ chemically from petroleum, or
    hydrocarbon, waxes and synthetic waxes. They are esters
    that result from a reaction between fatty acids and certain
    alcohols other than glycerol, either of a group called
    sterols (e.g., cholesterol) or an alcohol containing 12 or
    a larger even number of carbon atoms in a straight chain
    (e.g., cetyl alcohol). The fatty acids found in animal and
    vegetable waxes are almost always saturated. They vary from
    lauric to octatriacontanoic acid (C37H75COOH). Saturated
    alcohols from C12 to C36 have been identified in various
    waxes. Several dihydric (two hydroxyl groups) alcohols have
    been separated, but they do not form a large proportion of
    any wax. Also, several unidentified branched-chain fatty
    acids and alcohols have been found in minor quantities.
    Several cyclic sterols (e.g., cholesterol and analogues)
    make up major portions of wool wax.

    Only a few vegetable waxes are produced in commercial
    quantities. Carnauba wax, which is very hard and is used in
    some high-gloss polishes, is probably the most important of
    these. It is obtained from the surface of the fronds of a
    species of palm tree native to Brazil. A similar wax,
    candelilla wax, is obtained commercially from the surface of
    the candelilla plant, which grows wild in Texas and Mexico.
    Sugarcane wax, which occurs on the surface of sugarcane
    leaves and stalks, is obtainable from the sludges of cane-
    juice processing. Its properties and uses are similar to
    those of carnauba wax, but it is normally dark in colour and
    contains more impurities. Other cuticle waxes occur in trace
    quantities in such vegetable oils as linseed, soybean, corn
    (maize), and sesame. They are undesirable because they may
    precipitate when the oil stands at room temperature, but
    they can be removed by cooling and filtering. Cuticle wax
    accounts for the beautiful gloss of polished apples.

    Beeswax, the most widely distributed and important animal
    wax, is softer than the waxes mentioned and finds little use
    in gloss polishes. It is used, however, for its gliding and
    lubricating properties as well as in waterproofing
    formulations. Wool wax, the main constituent of the fat that
    covers the wool of sheep, is obtained as a by-product in
    scouring raw wool. Its purified form, called lanolin, is
    used as a pharmaceutical or cosmetic base because it is
    easily assimilated by the human skin. Sperm oil and
    spermaceti, both obtained from sperm whales, are liquid at
    ordinary temperatures and are used mainly as lubricants.

    About 90 percent of the wax used for commercial purposes is
    recovered from petroleum by dewaxing lubricating-oil stocks.
    Petroleum wax is generally classified into three principal
    types: paraffin (see paraffin wax), microcrystalline, and
    petrolatum. Paraffin is widely used in candles, crayons, and
    industrial polishes. It is also employed for insulating
    components of electrical equipment and for waterproofing
    wood and certain other materials. Microcrystalline wax is
    used chiefly for coating paper for packaging, and petrolatum
    is employed in the manufacture of medicinal ointments and
    cosmetics. Synthetic wax is derived from ethylene glycol, an
    organic compound commercially produced from ethylene gas. It
    is commonly blended with petroleum waxes to manufacture a
    variety of products.

    "wax" Encyclopædia Britannica from Encyclopædia Britannica
    Premium Service.
    http://www.britannica.com/eb/article?eu=78345 [Accessed
    March 11, 2004].
    ---

    ---= BOYCOTT FRENCH--GERMAN (belgium) =--- ---= Move UNITED
    NATIONS To Paris =--- Sheldon ```````````` "Life would be
    devoid of all meaning were it without tribulation."
     
  7. Scharone

    Scharone Guest

    "sueb" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...

    > I have my own lemon tree. I just pick them and use them so
    > there's no wax involved ever.
    >
    > but...lemon skin contains a lot of oils. When you wash
    > them, the oils come out. You may be washing away the wax,
    > then seeing the natural oil.

    Thanks to everyone who responded -- lots of good
    information here!!

    Scharone
     
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