Weather be damned, I _CAN_ ride!

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Rick Onanian, Feb 7, 2004.

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  1. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    I thought all you icky-weather riders were nuts.

    I was wrong!

    I rode today. Many of you will call this mild, not unpleasant weather. This was pushing it for me;
    the worst I've ever ridden before was warm, light rain.

    I must say: It was GREAT!

    43 degrees f. Snow and slush everywhere. Road covered in deep salt-water puddles and sections of
    slush. I've been itching to ride, and bitching about the weather.

    :Summary: With all the problems [listed below], it's amazing how much fun I had, how much I enjoyed
    the ride, and how much I now like the bike. Weather be damned! Terribly beat beater be damned! Wet
    ankles be damned! I can ride, damn it!

    I may even do it again in worse weather than this.

    :The ride: Probably 10 miles. Probably an hour. I didn't keep track. I don't know how fast I went,
    and I didn't care. I was riding, numbers and weather be damned! Woohoo!

    I saw one person with a snowblower attachment on his lawn tractor throwing the slush off his
    driveway. I saw a few shoveling.

    On the way home, a guy with a snowplow blew past me. Other drivers gave me more room and less speed.

    :The clothes: Long johns. Bike shorts. Noisy, water-resistant pants with yellow reflective ankle
    things to keep the baggy pants from getting in the chainrings. Two layers thick of wicking shirts.
    Noisy, water-resistant jacket. Thin, lightly insulated winter gloves with that same noisy, water-
    resistant material outside (what is that stuff, anyway?). Thin fleecey balaclava, bought Thursday;
    great even in the wind, and sufficient for probably another 5 or 10 degrees down. My mountain biking
    SPD boots.

    Okay, I just checked that material: The jacket is nylon. The pants are polyester. How do they make
    it crunchy and noisy and hard and nearly abrasive, and importantly, water-resistant? Different weave
    than the normal soft, quiet versions?

    Attention Rhode Islanders and anybody with a The Sports Authority store around: Balaclavas on sale
    cheap at The Sports Authority. $7 for the thin one, thicker ones for something like $10 and $15;
    they're marked two or three times their actual price. Find them in the snowboarding department.

    :The bike: I spent a half-hour un-seizing some of the seized parts of a beater: an ancient Windsor
    "International" (I think) that I've been considering making into a fixie, whose very nice stem
    shifters I would then use on another bike that needs them.

    I have decided that, as terrible as the condition is, I like this bike. The front derailer is sprung
    backwards, so when I push both shifters all the way in the same direction, I get the highest or
    lowest combination I can get -- except that the derailer adjustment screws were seized and I
    couldn't adjust them well. No top gear in the rear -- good, because the rear tire was NG, the road
    was wet, and I wasn't used to the cold wind. The front doesn't shift into the big ring very well, or
    very often. That backwards front derailer is cool; if only I could adjust it -- I snapped both
    screws on it. I'll get them out another day.

    Oh yes, the rear tire. Very rotted, didn't seem prudent to add too much air. It lost air pretty
    quickly anyway. When I finally decided to turn around and head home, I figured I pump it up a bit;
    that's when my pump broke, and let out what was left in the tire while it was at it. Luckily, I had
    a CO2 inflater in my backpack, and it was mostly downhill going home, so I put the contents of a 16g
    cartridge in it and rode it home.

    The freewheel was not freewheeling. I thought maybe I could test the theory of a fixed gear being
    sure to break a derailer-style tensioner. However, the WD-40 that I sprayed liberally into the
    freewheel must have found it's target shortly after I left the driveway.

    The rear wheel had at least one centimeter of lateral run-out. When I hurriedly attempted to true
    it, with it's seized nipples, I broke two spokes, both on the side that exacerbated the problem. I
    ended up with two spokes gone, the same lateral run-out, and now I think a flat spot on the rim. It
    was a little bumpy, once per revolution...

    As a result, I left the rear brake nearly useless for being so open. I did replace the missing pad,
    though; even so, it wasn't useful on the road.

    The front end was squirrely; it kept wanting to turn back and forth a few degrees; I think it's the
    headset, and also the cause of: I found out that it was pulling left. Either the frame or fork is
    bent, or the headset is beat. The headset feels a bit notchy, especially if I turn it left.

    The handlebars had this terrible, completely unpadded thin cloth tape on them. It didn't cover
    the non-aero brake levers, nor did they have rubber hoods; I still found them a reasonable place
    to hold on.

    The saddle was a bit hard, but more importantly, was not tightly attached, and tilted
    forward/backward whenever I shifted my weight. It'll probably be not-so-bad if I secure it and raise
    it an inch.

    Once the lube worked it's way in, the rear derailer and chain worked surprisingly nicely.

    I put my favorite cheapo SPD pedals on. Gotta have the pedals!

    I put two extra-cheap clamp-on fenders, bought for $5/each at Building #19 (a semi-local deep-
    discount liquidation chain). I was surprised how well they worked. I clamped one on the seatpost, as
    they're intended to do, and even way higher than the tire, it did it's job well enough. I clamped
    the other one on the head tube, between the downtube and top tube, and was shocked to find it did
    the job too, again with the tire far away.

    I didn't bother testing the QR levers before I left, and luckily, never needed to find out if
    they're any good.
     
    Tags:


  2. Q.

    Q. Guest

    <snip>
    > Attention Rhode Islanders and anybody with a The Sports Authority store around: Balaclavas on sale
    > cheap at The Sports Authority. $7 for the thin one, thicker ones for something like $10 and $15;
    > they're marked two or three times their actual price. Find them in the snowboarding department.

    Hunting clothing is usually cheep this time of the year as well. Rhode Island's archery season is
    from October 1st to January 31st and of course there are clearance sales on anything that's left
    over. Nice winter clothing if you don't mind camo. Archery clothing tends to be very quiet as well
    ... I know that bugs ya (c: Don't want to spook the deer when drawing a bow.

    C.Q.C.
     
  3. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > I thought all you icky-weather riders were nuts.
    >
    > I was wrong!
    >
    > I rode today. Many of you will call this mild, not unpleasant weather. This was pushing it for me;
    > the worst I've ever ridden before was warm, light rain.
    >
    > I must say: It was GREAT!

    Welcome to the winter riding club!

    ...

    > Okay, I just checked that material: The jacket is nylon. The pants are polyester. How do they make
    > it crunchy and noisy and hard and nearly abrasive, and importantly, water-resistant? Different
    > weave than the normal soft, quiet versions?

    Tight weave and thicker fibers, often with some kind of coating on them.

    ...

    > I have decided that, as terrible as the condition is, I like this

    I'm glad it's working for you, but don't spend more money on it than it's end condition
    will be worth!

    ....

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  4. >I thought all you icky-weather riders were nuts.

    >I was wrong!

    No, you were right the first time.

    --

    _______________________ALL AMIGA IN MY MIND_______________________ ------------------"Buddy Holly,
    the Texas Elvis"------------------
    __________306.350.357.38>>[email protected]__________
     
  5. Zoot Katz

    Zoot Katz Guest

    Sat, 07 Feb 2004 22:06:02 -0500, <[email protected]>,
    "Eric S. Sande" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >>I thought all you icky-weather riders were nuts.
    >
    >>I was wrong!
    >
    >No, you were right the first time.

    We're all Brazilians on this bus. . . uhh, bike.
    --
    zk
     
  6. Dane Jackson

    Dane Jackson Guest

    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote:
    > I thought all you icky-weather riders were nuts.

    > I was wrong!

    > I rode today. Many of you will call this mild, not unpleasant weather. This was pushing it for me;
    > the worst I've ever ridden before was warm, light rain.

    > I must say: It was GREAT!

    One of us! One of us! One of us!

    --
    Dane Jackson - z u v e m b i @ u n i x b i g o t s . o r g "Judges, as a class, display, in the
    matter of arranging alimony, that reckless generosity which is found only in men who are giving away
    someone else's cash." -P. G. Wodehouse
     
  7. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 20:09:42 -0500, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >> I have decided that, as terrible as the condition is, I like this
    >
    >I'm glad it's working for you, but don't spend more money on it than it's end condition will
    >be worth!

    I wouldn't need to spend money on it; I can just cannibalize other beaters. You saw part of my
    collection.. ;)
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  8. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > On Sat, 7 Feb 2004 20:09:42 -0500, David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    > >> I have decided that, as terrible as the condition is, I like this
    > >
    > >I'm glad it's working for you, but don't spend more money on it than it's end condition will
    > >be worth!
    >
    > I wouldn't need to spend money on it; I can just cannibalize other beaters. You saw part of my
    > collection.. ;)

    As long as you're cannibalizing and not buying, then go ahead and make any kind of Frankenbike
    you feel like <GGG>. Like putting those beautiful stem shifters on your newly tripleized road
    bike <G,D&R>.

    > --
    > Rick Onanian

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  9. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Mon, 9 Feb 2004 15:12:57 -0500, David Kerber
    <[email protected]_ids.net> wrote:
    >> I wouldn't need to spend money on it; I can just cannibalize other beaters. You saw part of my
    >> collection.. ;)
    >
    >As long as you're cannibalizing and not buying, then go ahead and make any kind of Frankenbike
    >you feel like <GGG>. Like putting those beautiful stem shifters on your newly tripleized road
    >bike <G,D&R>.

    No way Jose! I like my STI, thank you. For the Peugeot, however, which lacks STI...the Peugeot might
    get those stem shifters when the Windsor goes away.
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  10. Tanya Quinn

    Tanya Quinn Guest

    Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > 43 degrees f. Snow and slush everywhere. Road covered in deep salt-water puddles and sections of
    > slush. I've been itching to ride, and bitching about the weather.
    <snip>
    > stuff, anyway?). Thin fleecey balaclava, bought Thursday; great even in the wind, and sufficient
    > for probably another 5 or 10 degrees down. My mountain biking SPD boots.

    A balaclava at a balmy 6 degrees celsius? 6 in the winter up here in the great white north :) would
    be good cause to break out into tights, a t-shirt and light jacket.
     
  11. How many lunatics did I see riding today with bare legs? What is up with these people? It was 38 F
    on the way in, and 42 F on the way back. This is not knickers/shorts weather, people, even if the
    sun is shining in the afternoon.

    --
    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky
    Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com

    Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    New CD coming out this month! See: http://www.tiferet.net

    "To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner
    was you."
     
  12. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On 9 Feb 2004 16:24:41 -0800, [email protected] (Tanya Quinn)
    wrote:
    >A balaclava at a balmy 6 degrees celsius? 6 in the winter up here in the great white north :) would
    >be good cause to break out into tights, a t-shirt and light jacket.

    Well, lots of wind, lots of downhill, and I'm new to riding imperfect weather...
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  13. Mark Hickey

    Mark Hickey Guest

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >How many lunatics did I see riding today with bare legs? What is up with these people? It was 38 F
    >on the way in, and 42 F on the way back. This is not knickers/shorts weather, people, even if the
    >sun is shining in the afternoon.

    I don't wear leg warmers or tights until it's well below freezing... just don't need to I guess.
    By the time I've been out long enough for my legs to get cold, they're generating enough heat to
    stay warm.

    Personally I'm more amazed by the riders who will be riding in long tights, fleece, wind jackets,
    full fingered gloves and balaclavas when it's 50 (10C). I would spontaneously combust if I did that.

    Mark Hickey Habanero Cycles http://www.habcycles.com Home of the $695 ti frame
     
  14. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >How many lunatics did I see riding today with bare legs? What is up with these people? It was 38
    > >F on the way in, and 42 F on the way back. This is not knickers/shorts weather, people, even if
    > >the sun is shining in the afternoon.
    >
    > I don't wear leg warmers or tights until it's well below freezing... just don't need to I guess.
    > By the time I've been out long enough for my legs to get cold, they're generating enough heat to
    > stay warm.
    >
    > Personally I'm more amazed by the riders who will be riding in long tights, fleece, wind
    > jackets, full fingered gloves and balaclavas when it's 50 (10C). I would spontaneously combust
    > if I did that.

    I'll sometimes wear thin tights at that temp, especially if it's windy and not sunny, but otherwise
    I agree with you. Definitely no jacket or balaclava. I was out Sunday in 25F (-4C) with windfront
    tights, a turtleneck and a light windbreaker, and found that I had to unzip the windbreaker part way
    to keep from overheating.

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  15. Rick, if you live somwhere where it's still in the forties then you can ride all year long! I'm in
    Chicago, and lots of people commute daily. We even had a great turnout at a Critical Mass ride when
    it was 0F!

    Eschew the balaclava! You will generate too much heat! The more you ride the more you become
    acclimated to cold weather.

    "Tanya Quinn" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Rick Onanian <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > > 43 degrees f. Snow and slush everywhere. Road covered in deep salt-water puddles and sections of
    > > slush. I've been itching to ride, and bitching about the weather.
    > <snip>
    > > stuff, anyway?). Thin fleecey balaclava, bought Thursday; great even in the wind, and sufficient
    > > for probably another 5 or 10 degrees down. My mountain biking SPD boots.
    >
    > A balaclava at a balmy 6 degrees celsius? 6 in the winter up here in the great white north :)
    > would be good cause to break out into tights, a t-shirt and light jacket.
     
  16. Steve Knight

    Steve Knight Guest

    On Tue, 10 Feb 2004 07:39:19 -0700, Mark Hickey <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I don't wear leg warmers or tights until it's well below freezing... just don't need to I guess.
    >By the time I've been out long enough for my legs to get cold, they're generating enough heat to
    >stay warm.

    they may not feel cold but it is really hard on your knees. and when you get older your sure going
    to notice the problems. I wear tights when it is below 60. I don't need them for warmth but I sure
    don't want knee problems.

    --
    Knight-Toolworks & Custom Planes Custom made wooden planes at reasonable prices See http://www.knight-
    toolworks.com For prices and ordering instructions.
     
  17. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]_s02>,
    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> writes:
    > How many lunatics did I see riding today with bare legs? What is up with these people?

    Bike tan maintenance maybe? I could use some, myself. Mine changes through the seasons like phases
    of the moon.

    > It was 38 F on the way in, and 42 F on the way back. This is not knickers/shorts weather, people,
    > even if the sun is shining in the afternoon.

    I'm getting impatient to switch back to fingerless gloves. Full-finger gloves are such
    encumberances. But, it beats cold, sore fingernails.

    Yesterday was fairly nice here. I did a little jaunt up to New Brighton Park; there was big,
    ominous, dirty-dark cloud in the middle of the sky, with lots of clear blue around the horizon, and
    clouds half-way down the North Shore mountains. It was cool enough to be a 4 nose-blow ride
    (could/should have been more).

    Funny thing was, when I got to the park, just about each bench was occupied by a rider who had the
    same notion of going there. Maybe some sort of cyclist migrating instinct was going on. Didn't see
    any bare knees there, though. I had the ulterior motive of riding through the harbour (which is a
    federal jurisdiction) to see if I'd get kicked out, but I shined that idea on after imagining myself
    being detained and then deported to somewhere nasty.

    It's really pretty out today. I think I might mow the front lawn. The grass is starting to grow
    again. I've got snowdrops in full bloom, and the daffs are shooting up. There's some dandelions to
    dig up out there, too. BTW -- the early spring dandelions are the good ones for making wine.

    cheers, Tom
    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  18. David Kerber

    David Kerber Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...

    ...

    > Funny thing was, when I got to the park, just about each bench was occupied by a rider who had the
    > same notion of going there. Maybe some sort of cyclist migrating instinct was going on. Didn't see
    > any bare knees there, though. I had the ulterior motive of riding through the harbour (which is a
    > federal jurisdiction) to see if I'd get kicked out, but I shined that idea on after imagining
    > myself being detained and then deported to somewhere nasty.

    They can't deport you if you're a citizen; send you to a nasty jail somewhere else in the country,
    but not deport you.

    ....

    --
    Dave Kerber Fight spam: remove the ns_ from the return address before replying!

    REAL programmers write self-modifying code.
     
  19. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    David Kerber <[email protected]_ids.net> writes:

    > They can't deport you if you're a citizen; send you to a nasty jail somewhere else in the country,
    > but not deport you.

    I'm writing from Canada, where the gov't can pretty well do whatever it damn well pleases.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  20. Kaputnik

    Kaputnik Guest

    Well, some people really do seem not to feel the cold. I've seen enough people (not just bicyclists)
    over the years wearing shorts when the temp is below freezing that it no longer surprises me. My
    legs would fall off, but I can't believe that all of these people are just showing off.

    Not sure what the coldest temp is at which I've seen bicyclists wearing shorts, but it was certainly
    below my comfort level.

    "Claire Petersky" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]_s02>...
    > How many lunatics did I see riding today with bare legs? What is up with these people? It was 38 F
    > on the way in, and 42 F on the way back. This is not knickers/shorts weather, people, even if the
    > sun is shining in the afternoon.
    >
    >
    > --
    > Warm Regards,
    >
    > Claire Petersky Please replace earthlink for mouse-potato and .net for .com
    >
    > Home of the meditative cyclist: http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm
    >
    > New CD coming out this month! See: http://www.tiferet.net
    >
    > "To forgive is to set the prisoner free and then discover the prisoner was you."
     
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