Wednesday in the Lakes

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Tony Simpkins, Feb 19, 2004.

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  2. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

  3. Mike Mason

    Mike Mason Guest

    Same day.

    Ah the joys of half term holiday.

    Mental aberration. Went for a walk up Scafell Pike. Lots of people around not really dressed for the
    weather (cold and sunny with a dusting of snow from Lingmell Col up) and mums and dads taking their
    children for a walk to the top.

    Best laugh of the day. Loud voice on Scafell Pike telling someone over their mobile that he wasn't
    anywhere near a fax machine.

    Good walk though, route was Lingmell, Scafell Pike, Broad Crag, Ill Crag (first time I've been
    there, good view of Scafell Pike from the top), Great End and then down over Seathwaite Fell. Rather
    nice area this, no path as such, very quite and peaceful until I dropped down onto the path from
    Styhead to Stockley Bridge. Crossed the stream and went down the far bank for a look at Taylorgill
    Force and then back to Seathwaite. Nice day out despite the crowds.

    Mike Mason

    "Tony Simpkins" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Wonderful weather in the Lakes yesterday. Beetham Cottage to Place Fell via Hayeswater, Rest Dodd,
    > Angle Tarn and back along the lake. http://www.simpkins57.freeserve.co.uk/pan01-72dpi-800w.jpg Ah
    > ... the joys of retirement. Tony Simpkins
     
  4. Roger

    Roger Guest

    The message <[email protected]>
    from "Tony Simpkins" <[email protected]> contains these words:

    > Wonderful weather in the Lakes yesterday.

    And maybe today (Friday) as well at least in central Lakeland but where I was on the fringe there
    was more cloud and the cold wind did for my bad knee. First walk in over 2 months and sadly last
    years fitness has disappeared as well.

    > Ah ... the joys of retirement.

    Yes, although bits are more likely to fail in service than when we were younger.

    I picked what I thought would be an easy walk as well. The Bannisdale Horseshoe out of Wainwrights
    Outlying Fells. 11.5 miles and 2000 feet of ascent with a guide time of 7 hours. I logged 11.1 miles
    and 3000 feet of ascent but only took 4 hours 40 minutes so am not at all sure I should be
    attempting these geriatric walks at my age.

    Incidentally although it felt all of 3000 feet of ascent to me my rather ancient map seems closer to
    Wainwright with perhaps 2250 feet of ascent. The profile in Ozi doesn't look obviously wrong and I
    did notice a number of minor ups and downs not at all visible on the map so the discrepancy might
    not be down to the Summit seeing hills that aren't there.

    --

    Roger
     
  5. Fran

    Fran Guest

    [email protected] said...
    > Best laugh of the day. Loud voice on Scafell Pike telling someone over their mobile that he wasn't
    > anywhere near a fax machine.
    >
    Well, really. You just can't get the mountains these days, can you. Fancy not having a fax machine
    there for those who might need it.
    --
    Fran If you need my email address please ask.
     
  6. Blippie

    Blippie Guest

    >Best laugh of the day. Loud voice on Scafell Pike telling someone over
    their
    >mobile that he wasn't anywhere near a fax machine.

    Hanging is too good for them!

    Cheers

    Blippie
    --
    Visit the alt.aviation.safety FAQ online at www.blippie.org.uk
     
  7. Richard C

    Richard C Guest

    "Blippie" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > >Best laugh of the day. Loud voice on Scafell Pike telling someone over
    > their
    > >mobile that he wasn't anywhere near a fax machine.
    >
    > Hanging is too good for them!
    >
    > Cheers
    >
    > Blippie

    They have mobile-phone-free cariages on trains so what about mobile-phone-free hills? The whole
    point of being out is that people can't phone you up. I take my phone with me into the hills (for
    emergencies) but it's always switched off.
     
  8. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article
    <[email protected]>, Richard C
    <[email protected]> writes
    >They have mobile-phone-free cariages on trains so what
    >about mobile-phone-free hills? The whole point of being
    >out is that people can't phone you up. I take my phone
    >with me into the hills (for emergencies) but it's always
    >switched off.

    What's the problem? Either leave the phone "on" in
    "discreet" mode if you don't want to disturb the other
    walkers or sheep, or leave it turned off and use it only for
    your own purposes.

    While you're at it - why not mobile free restaurants, or
    toilets, or shopping queues?

    One guy in ASDA's toilet should have had a "hands-
    free" set up!
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  9. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

  10. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Paul Rooney <[email protected]> writes
    >But it can add to the excitement. My mate got a phone call
    >while we were crossing the tricky bit on Sharp Edge in a
    >strong wind.
    Where's your sense of narrative? " ............on Sharp Edge
    in a keen wind." would have been better :)
    :)
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
  11. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On 27 Feb 2004 12:36:50 -0800, [email protected] (Richard C)
    wrote:

    > The whole point of being out is that people can't
    > phone you up.

    Eh? That's not why I go out. I can see that this might apply
    to the maritally (relationally?) challenged, but I enjoy
    chatting to the wife from a summit - usually about food. Or
    travelling-home plans. Or stopping-out plans. Unless she
    happens to be with me, in which case I don't phone her.

    --

    Paul

    My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003):

    http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
     
  12. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Sat, 20 Mar 2004 23:55:51 +0000, Paul Rooney wrote:

    > Or stopping-out plans.

    I thought that "just happened".....
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the
    "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  13. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "Paul Rooney" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > On 27 Feb 2004 12:36:50 -0800, [email protected]
    > (Richard C) wrote:
    >
    > > The whole point of being out is that people can't phone
    > > you up.

    News to me.

    But I'm not surprised this thread has reappeared for the n-
    th time since about 1994. It just won't die.

    > Eh? That's not why I go out.

    I quite like the fact that I can feel free to go out,
    knowing that if am needed somewhere I can easily be
    contacted.

    > I can see that this might apply to the maritally
    > (relationally?) challenged, but I enjoy chatting to the
    > wife from a summit - usually about food.

    To each their own.

    > Or travelling-home plans. Or stopping-out plans.

    Flexibility in other words.

    > Unless she happens to be with me, in which case I don't
    > phone her.

    You text her instead, right?
    --
    Mark South - Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net
    <<Tiens! Ce poulet a une grenade!
     
  14. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "W. D. Grey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article
    > <[email protected]>, Richard
    > C <[email protected]> writes
    > >They have mobile-phone-free cariages on trains so what
    > >about mobile-phone-free hills? The whole point of being
    > >out is that people can't phone you up. I take my phone
    > >with me into the hills (for emergencies) but it's always
    > >switched off.

    That's your right and privilege.

    > What's the problem? Either leave the phone "on" in
    > "discreet" mode if you don't want to disturb the other
    > walkers or sheep, or leave it turned off and use it only
    > for your own purposes.

    Or use vibrate mode and only speak normally into it. Or
    perhaps we should have "No Talking" signs on the hills. ISTR
    that Wainwright would have preferred this.

    > While you're at it - why not mobile free restaurants, or
    > toilets, or shopping queues?

    What we'd all like is loudmouth-free zones. Banning mobile
    phones doesn't help with that, the loudmouths just bring a
    friend and one has to listen to both sides of the
    conversation.

    > One guy in ASDA's toilet should have had a "hands-
    > free" set up!

    Or a better guidance system. GPS?
    --
    Mark South - Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net
    <<Tiens! Ce poulet a une grenade!
     
  15. Paul Rooney wrote:

    >> The whole point of being out is that people can't phone
    >> you up.
    >
    > Eh? That's not why I go out.

    It's one of the reasons why I go out - to get away from it
    all. Kinda spoils the illusion of wilderness if you have
    people phoning you up all time. The solitude is a major part
    of the appeal for me. I don't get lonely in the hills, quite
    the contrary, a few days of total peace and quiet is
    incredibly relaxing. Phone calls would be an unwelcome
    intrusion into the solitude. The mere knowledge that the
    phone might ring at any time would bother me. I love being
    out of contact.

    Now that I've got a mobile I will take it with me, but it
    will be turned off for the duration, unless there's a
    specific reason why I'd need to leave it on.

    Paul
    --
    http://www.wilderness-wales.co.uk
    http://www.wildwales.fsnet.co.uk
    http://www.photosig.com/go/users/userphotos?id=118749
     
  16. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2004 10:54:55 +0000, Phil Cook
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >On Sat, 20 Mar 2004 23:55:51 +0000, Paul Rooney wrote:
    >
    >> Or stopping-out plans.
    >
    >I thought that "just happened".....

    It's been known to happen by prior arrangement too (-:

    --

    Paul

    My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003):

    http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
     
  17. Paul Rooney

    Paul Rooney Guest

    On Sun, 21 Mar 2004 14:45:53 -0000, "Paul Saunders"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >It's one of the reasons why I go out - to get away from it
    >all. Kinda spoils the illusion of wilderness if you have
    >people phoning you up all time.

    But it can add to the excitement. My mate got a phone call
    while we were crossing the tricky bit on Sharp Edge in a
    strong wind.

    --

    Paul

    My Lake District walking site (updated 29th September 2003):

    http://paulrooney.netfirms.com
     
  18. Dave Pickles

    Dave Pickles Guest

    Paul Rooney wrote:

    > But it can add to the excitement. My mate got a phone call
    > while we were crossing the tricky bit on Sharp Edge in a
    > strong wind.

    "I'M IN THE. . ."

    v

    v

    v

    v

    v

    usual gulley.
    --
    Dave
     
  19. Mark South

    Mark South Guest

    "W. D. Grey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > In article <[email protected]>, Mark South
    > <[email protected]> writes
    > >But I'm not surprised this thread has reappeared for the
    > >n-th time since about 1994. It just won't die.
    >
    > Don't knock it - it makes a change from Canon 300 D et al.

    Any minute now the two topics will combine and we'll start
    hearing demands that photography be banned on the hills
    because so many walkers have their enjoyment of a day out
    ruined by the sound of mirror slap fro reflex cameras.
    --
    Mark South - Citizen of the World, Denizen of the Net
    <<Tiens! Ce poulet a une grenade!
     
  20. W. D. Grey

    W. D. Grey Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Mark South
    <[email protected]> writes
    >"W. D. Grey" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    >news:[email protected]...
    >> In article <[email protected]>, Mark South
    >> <[email protected]> writes
    >> >But I'm not surprised this thread has reappeared for the
    >> >n-th time since about 1994. It just won't die.
    >>
    >> Don't knock it - it makes a change from Canon 300 D et
    >> al.
    >
    >Any minute now the two topics will combine and we'll start
    >hearing demands that photography be banned on the hills
    >because so many walkers have their enjoyment of a day out
    >ruined by the sound of mirror slap fro reflex cameras.

    Let sleeping dogs lie eh :)
    --
    Bill Grey http://www.billboy.co.uk
     
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