Weight limit on bikes?



D

Daniel

Guest
Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand bikes.
OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike that
after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped" the shop
were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace) all the
spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and not the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235 pounds
and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the sidewalks in a nearby city that has lots to
explore and see especially their old mansions. I am not one to ride up or down curbs, nor abuse my
bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.

Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
is there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
model bike?

Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)

Dan
 
P

Paul Southworth

Guest
In article <[email protected]>,
Daniel <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom> wrote:
>Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
>bikes. OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike
>that after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped"
>the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace)
>all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and not the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235
>pounds and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the sidewalks in a nearby city that has lots
>to explore and see especially their old mansions. I am not one to ride up or down curbs, nor abuse
>my bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.
>
>Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
>Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
>for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
>is there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
>model bike?
>
>Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)
>

What you need is not a new bike but a new wheel built by an expert who can both recommend the proper
components and build and stress relieve it properly. Assuming the spokes were good quality, what was
deficient was probably the labor.

Ask a local bike club where to find an expert wheelbuilder who has a good track record of building
wheels for demanding riders. Buy the wheel they recommend for you. Use large tires and check
inflation pressure before each ride.

Inexpensive mass-produced bikes often have poor quality wheels. You do get better parts on more
expensive bikes, but a good hand-built wheel, really tight, with lots of spokes, will be superior to
any reasonably priced factory wheel.

--Paul
 

Cipher

New Member
Sep 7, 2002
782
2
18
Originally posted by Daniel
Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand bikes.
OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike that
after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped" the shop
were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace) all the
spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and not the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235 pounds
and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the sidewalks in a nearby city that has lots to
explore and see especially their old mansions. I am not one to ride up or down curbs, nor abuse my
bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.

Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
is there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
model bike?

Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)

Dan

I don't believe anything would really change from one bike manufacturer to the next, I think it's really a matter of spoke guage and count for starters. For your size I think you would want 14 ga. with a 32 spoke count. I would also go with the largest rear tire you can fit (38mm) and still maintain brake and chain stay clearance. Good Luck.
 

Cipher

New Member
Sep 7, 2002
782
2
18
I should add a 32 spoke count should be considered minimum, or maybe a rim with a 36 spoke count.
 
R

Rick Onanian

Guest
On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 17:22:13 -0500, "Daniel" <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom>
wrote:
>Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand bikes. OR
>maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike that after
>2 years of use started the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235 pounds and ride mostly on bike down
>curbs, nor abuse my bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.

I'm 210 pounds and have 500 miles on my Giant TCR2 without a single spoke broken. I ride it on
roads, sometimes pretty rough roads, and occasionally find myself on a dirt road. It came with Mavic
CXP-21 rims and Shimano 105 hubs. I run my 700x23c tires at 125psi.

>Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company

No. The bike shop that assembled the bike should have given proper attention to the wheel.

Question for bike shop owners/workers: Do the bikes come with the wheels pre-built? If so, do you
re-tension and stress relieve them?

>or maybe I should try some other companies products? Gary Fisher or Trek?

That won't help. Try a different bike shop, if you really want to replace the whole bike; else,
replace or repair the wheels (properly).

Get the book "The Bicycle Wheel" by Jobst Brandt. After reading it, you'll be able to make your
wheels very strong just by properly tensioning and "stress relieving" them.

>Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350 for my Cypress DX Cross
>Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all, is

In general, no. More expensive bikes tend to be made to save weight, although the materials and
workmanship may be better.
--
Rick Onanian
 
F

Frank Knox

Guest
"Daniel" <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
> bikes. OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike
> that after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped"
> the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace)
> all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and
not
> the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235 pounds and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the
> sidewalks in a nearby city that has lots to explore and see especially their old mansions. I am
> not one to ride up or down curbs, nor abuse my bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.
>
> Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
> Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
> for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
is
> there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
> model bike?
>
> Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)
>
> Dan
>
Get advice from the experts. If you are really interested in learning buy Jobst Brandt's book The
Bicycle Wheel. Or, Go here: http://www.sheldonbrown.com/wheels/ Or here:
http://www.peterwhitecycles.com/Wheels.asp
 
P

Paulus

Guest
Here in Australia Giant has a bad rep when it comes to the wheels it provides on it bikes. I break a
spoke on my Giant ATX every other ride (i'm 81 kg and am a notorious soke breaker on bith mtn and
road bikes for some reason - usually when I go around corners or start a sprint).

Anyway, my brother got his mountain bike's wheels rebuilt for free as he complained to Giant that
the wheels they provided him on his mountain bike did not live up to what they were inteded for (ie
work without snapping spokes left right and centre!).

Cheers

"Daniel" <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom> wrote in message news:[email protected]...
> Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
> bikes. OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike
> that after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped"
> the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace)
> all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and
not
> the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235 pounds and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the
> sidewalks in a nearby city that has lots to explore and see especially their old mansions. I am
> not one to ride up or down curbs, nor abuse my bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.
>
> Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
> Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
> for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
is
> there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
> model bike?
>
> Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)
>
> Dan
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
daniel-<< Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
bikes. >><BR><BR> << The first time one "popped" the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it.
Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace) all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes
and not the labor >><BR><BR> << Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try
some other companies products? Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to
daily use? >><BR><BR>

This is a symptom of the bike shop doing a poor job in assembly of the bike when new. Seldom
does a bike shop do anything but slap these things together(not just yours, but most all of
the bikes in boxes), and don't do things like taking the tires off and actually truing,
rounding, tensioning and STRESS RELIEVING the wheels. Most service managers are clueless and
can't understand why new-ish bikes come back so often with problems. If they would spend the
time at the beginning they would save time(and $$) in the long run. Another problem is the
assemblers are generally at the low end of the wrenching food chain and may not be able to
do things like properly service a wheel.

Have the bike shop, and a good wheelbuilder, properly service your wheels. Cheap components
can last for years if properly serviced when new.

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
Q

Qui Si Parla Ca

Guest
cipher-<< I think it's really a matter of spoke guage and count for starters. For your size I think
you would want 14 ga. with a 32 spoke count. >><BR><BR>

36 hole, 14/15 spokes, a proper rim and good build.

Peter Chisholm Vecchio's Bicicletteria 1833 Pearl St. Boulder, CO, 80302
(303)440-3535 http://www.vecchios.com "Ruote convenzionali costruite eccezionalmente bene"
 
D

dsr

Guest
On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 17:22:13 -0500, "Daniel" <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom>
wrote:

>Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
>bikes. OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike
>that after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped"
>the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace)
>all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and not the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235
>pounds and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the sidewalks in a nearby city that has lots
>to explore and see especially their old mansions. I am not one to ride up or down curbs, nor abuse
>my bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.
>
>Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
>Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
>for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
>is there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
>model bike?
>
>Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)
>
>Dan
>

The machine laced spokes on the rear of my old Schwinn started breaking after about 10,000 miles. I
rebuilt the wheel lacing the spokes so that I could adjust the tension by tone. Got them real tight
like the original factory laced spokes on the front wheel. One of the new spokes broke after only a
week so I backed off the tension a little and everything is fine now 2000 miles with no problems.

I rode an old beach cruiser once that had spokes so loose the bottom of the rim flopped around like
the Galloping Gurdy bridge! I really believe some wheels come with spokes that are too tight though.

My solution was to start with the spokes of the rear wheel a little duller in tone than the front,
but with an even tone for all spokes. If the wheel did not stay in true I would tighten two spokes
an eighth of a turn opposite the bulge {use the brake pad as a guide). I did this a couple of times
raising the spoke tension a little each time the wheel needed truing. The spokes reached a tension
where truing was no longer needed and I have had no more broken spokes.

You can't expect a bike shop to spend that much time futzing around. My LBS told me I needed to buy
a double rim. This probably would have made the spoke tension a little less critical but was not a
compromise I wished to make.
 
P

Peter Cole

Guest
"Daniel" <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom> wrote in message
news:[email protected]...
> Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
> bikes. OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike
> that after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped"
> the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace)
> all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and not the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight
> 235 pounds and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the sidewalks in a nearby city that has
> lots to explore and see especially their old mansions. I am not one to ride up or down curbs, nor
> abuse my bike. I only rode it 670 miles last year.
>
> Anyway, should I curse the Giant bike company or maybe I should try some other companies products?
> Gary Fisher or Trek? Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350
> for my Cypress DX Cross Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all,
> is there anyone out there that is my weight that has had good luck with a particular brand or
> model bike?
>
> Comments, ideas, suggestions and wise ass remarks welcome :)

Breaking spokes maybe means that you got a bad batch of spokes (or crappy brand), but it's much
more likely you just got a badly built wheel. Shops should tweak up wheels before they sell bikes,
but most seem not to. You could learn how to do it yourself (pretty easy) or find a shop that
knows how. Even a cheap mail-order $50 wheel set will give years of service for someone your size
if set up right. I'm 6'10, 235, and have successfully ridden a lot of cheap wheels for a long
time, on & off road.

To learn to tweak wheels yourself, check the rec.bicycles.tech FAQ, Sheldon Brown's web site, and
maybe buy Jobst Brandt's book (if you're really curious).
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 17:22:13 -0500, "Daniel" <dcxdanATwowwayDOTcom>
may have said:

>Hi, Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand
>bikes. OR maybe I am just too much of a man to ride their bikes:) I have a Giant Cypress DX bike
>that after 2 years of use started breaking spokes on the rear wheel. The first time one "popped"
>the shop were I bought the bike from replaced it. Then next time they decided to replace (re-lace)
>all the spokes, but just charged me for the spokes and not the labor. I am 6'2" tall and weight 235
>pounds and ride mostly on bike trails, but also ride the sidewalks...

Wait and see if the spokes continue to break. If they don't, then put it down to high-speed machine
assembly of the wheel (which seldom includes proper stress relieving) and ride on. If the failures
resume, then there's a problem...but I'm betting that they won't.

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
W

Werehatrack

Guest
On Fri, 20 Feb 2004 18:35:08 -0500, Rick Onanian <[email protected]>
may have said:

>Question for bike shop owners/workers: Do the bikes come with the wheels pre-built? If so, do you
>re-tension and stress relieve them?

I am not a bike shop owner or worker, but I know that some wheels come pre-built. On the other hand,
in the opinion of the guy at the nearest lbs whose advice I trust, none can be used without stress
relief, some truing and tensioning.

>>Will a more expensive bike hold up better to daily use? I spent about $350 for my Cypress DX Cross
>>Comfort bike. Do you get a more rugged bike for more money? last of all, is
>
>In general, no. More expensive bikes tend to be made to save weight, although the materials and
>workmanship may be better.

More expensive bikes may be more economical to repair at times. If the big chainring on an mtb gets
dinged on a cheap bike with non-removable sprockets, it's going to be necessary to replace the
entire crankset, for example. And this does not even begin to address the issue of the cost of
frustration with malperformance of cheap components on the lowest-price bikes.

OTOH, there is a lot less added utility when going from a $400 bike to an $800 bike than there is
when comparing a $200 bike to a $400 bike. There is a point of diminishing returns, and for me, it
is around $500. Your needs and experience may vary.

--
My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
 
X

x

Guest
RE/
>Just wanted to ask if anyone else has had problems with broken rear spokes on Giant brand bikes.

Has your chain ever slipped off the biggest cog into the space between spokes and cog? That can set
the stage for later breakages.
--
PeteCresswell