Weight loss and loss of power

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by awilki01, Dec 7, 2011.

  1. awilki01

    awilki01 New Member

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    Hey everyone. Being that I'm quite overweight - 5' 10" at 196 lbs - I had decided a month ago after my last A priority event to start focusing on weight loss during the off-season. I was fine until recently. I've been doing mainly Zone 3 rides and SS intervals in an attempt to maintain (or maybe increase) my FTP during the off-season. And, I don't have the hours required to get any benefit out of Zone 2 riding. My SS intervals feel like full out threshold intervals now. Zone 3 after a good solid 30 minutes start getting super tough. My heart rate is higher than it normally was before I started the caloric reduction as well. I have nothing left it seems. My legs just feel like logs now. I've been keeping a decent track of my calories and am only aiming for a 500 calorie/day deficit. I've lost about 10 pounds in roughly 6 weeks. My goal is to get down to 165-170 lbs. If I don't make it before a big event next year, I will just deal with the weight I'm at about 8-12 weeks prior to the event. I know during the hard training, nutrition and caloric balance is absolutely key.

    I was told that one could maintain performance (or even increase it) with a 500 calorie/day deficit, but my power meter is telling me something different. What is your experience with this?

    I guess I will just suck it up and keep at the SS intervals and Zone 3 rides the best I can. I may have to back off a little on the intensity at times.
     
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  2. geebe

    geebe New Member

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    I will say that losing weight and maintaining performance is hard to do, but not impossible. I did it a few years ago. Lost about 15lbs while doing a lot of Z3/4 work. What I found was that the proper amount of carbohydrates and the proper timing of them was essential. Like all the literature says, you should make sure you eat within 15 minutes of getting off the bike. For me it is a chocolate soy milk and a bagel or a cup of pasta/rice. That seems to work for me. Then, about an hour afterwards I eat a regular meal, which for me usually coincides with lunch or dinner. I have read that the human body can only process about 300 calories/hr so your directly-after ride meal should be kept to around that amount. I am no nutritionist however. On longer rides 2+ hours, I also found that to be able to repeat a good performance I needed to make sure I ate or consumed a sports-drink on the bike. Again, since you can't process more that 300 calories/hr, there is no need to exceed that. Many people on this forum are much more experienced than me, so I may need to be corrected.
    For me, I also became aware of how much snacking I did and it took discipline to eat only at meal times or directly after rides. It took about 3 weeks to get used to not snacking all the time. I also became aware of portion size and eating good food rather than crap. Your body needs calories but pay attention to the calorie counter on your powermeter and the time at which you consume those calories.
    I'll tell you what, staying with the strong riders on the climbs feels a whole lot better than that food ever did!
    Hope this helps.
     
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  3. Jman

    Jman New Member

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    I'm no expert but you may want to check out the free webinar from Training Peaks "5 Stages To Achieving Optimum Body Composition".
     
  4. geneseo

    geneseo New Member

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    fantastic book

    http://www.amazon.com/Racing-Weight-Lean-Peak-Performance/dp/1934030511/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1323435737&sr=8-1

    A question I would have for you is if you are eating while on the bike. I've personally experienced that this is the most key item. I used to think that I needed to be restrictive on the bike and the exact opposite is true. Eat on the bike, and get in the best workout possible. Restrict when off the bike. I'm even using a sports drink or my one hour trainer rides (SST/LT intervals).

    What I've found is that eating on the bike leaves me feeling great through my workout and actually decreases my hunger throughout the rest of the day. Not eating on the bike leaves me tired during my workout and puts me in a hole where I'm hungry through the rest of the day and messes up my recovery.

    Since October I've lost 12 pounds (I'm 6'2" and went from 193 to 181) and have only seen my performance go up.
     
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  5. dhk2

    dhk2 Active Member

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    Your story is familar to me. 500 kcal/day deficit has been widely quoted, but not sure it really has a scientific basis. At any rate, if you've lost 10 lbs in 6 weeks, you've likely exceeded that. Consider that if 3600 kcals deficit "equals" one lb lost, your 10 lb loss in 6 weeks represents 6000 kcals/week, or 850 kcals/day. With that kind of restriction, no surprise your running low on energy.

    If you want to continue hard training, suggest you try adding a 250 kcal serving of quality carbs at least 90 minutes before your ride. Oatmeal, whole grain cereals, bread, pasta should be the ticket. Then, while you're training, take another 100 kcals of sport drink or bike snacks with water.

    But it's OK if your training suffers a bit now. If you succeed with the rapid weight loss during off season, you'll have plenty of time to resume hard training and be flying uphills in the spring.
     
  6. awilki01

    awilki01 New Member

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    First off! Thanks everyone!!! I will take a look at that webinar and book.

    I think that is my issue - not taking in calories before or during the ride. When I was at my former weight of 206 - 207 and training hard for my time trial, I made sure to fuel up on the ride at around 250-300 calories/hour. I was religious about a recovery drink and meal. I didn't care to lose weight then. My focus was on performance. Now, maybe I have made a bad decision in trying to restrict too much - no fueling on rides and not much in the way of recovery. I think I have worked my way into a performance black hole in doing this. I will make a point to make sure I start refueling during the ride to see if that helps. I will also work in a recovery drink and focus on restricting calories off the bike.

    @dhk2, you caught me. After I posted, I realized that based on my weight loss over the 6 weeks, I'm probably over the 500 calorie/day deficit without realizing it. Maybe my BMR is higher than what my app says it is - based on a higher fitness level.
     
  7. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    I find that it's not lots of exercise of being skimpy on the food intake that determines the most whether I shed weight and keep fairly fresh - it's getting more sleep.

    If you up the cals out (stress) and reduce the cals in (stress) you need to offset with more sleep.
     
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  8. Crooks

    Crooks New Member

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    My trainer says that the excessive calories of my body becomes the abs and wings and the fat finally comes to the wings and abs.Is this true ?
     
  9. Phil85207

    Phil85207 New Member

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    One thing you may try is a visit to the doctor for some blood work. I had just about the same thing happen to my as you did (loosing strength) and could not figure the reason. I went to the doctor on another issue and mentioned my lack of cycling power to him and he ordered some blood work. It turns out that my thyroid got lazy on me and all kinds of things happen after that. It's just a thought but your issue could be unrelated the the workouts like mine was. Good luck.
     
  10. awilki01

    awilki01 New Member

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    Thanks. I found my issue to be trying to limit calories before, during, and after a training session. I took geneseo's advice and began taking in calories as I normally would prior to, during, and after training sessions. I watch the intake at other times to maintain that 500 calorie deficit/day. All is well now. Now, I just need to regain the progress I lost over the Christmas break.
     
  11. Not Sure

    Not Sure New Member

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    If it took 15 yrs to get your body into it's current state, it may take 5 or 10 to get it out.

    If you try to change your body too fast, and/ or, through artificial means, it will negatively effect your physical fitness.

    If your body composition continues to be an issue even as you're following your scientific training plan, you may have issues other than diet and exercise.

    What the hell is that photo of a pile of gadgets doing next to this topic? It should be someone standing in front of a mirror staring at theirself.
     
  12. Tyler520

    Tyler520 New Member

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    I am by no means an expert, but I am share my personal experience.

    In a little over a year, I dropped 60 pounds riding a zone 3 regimen - from 250 pounds, to 190 - in about a year and a half.

    Obviously, a lot of the guys on this board are in a different situation - competitive riders who ride several hours a day.

    But in my opinion, a regimen for me which was intended to shed fat and just stay in decent shape, versus someone already in great shape, who wants to compete better, will be greatly different.

    In my case, I decided to cut carbs, and increase lean protein and green leafy veg. Sure, carbs give you short bursts of energy, which is great for a competitive cyclist, but protein was better for someone in my position who just needed a good source of energy to get through the day, and also needed to change my eating habits. My regimen consisted of 1 - 1.5 hour rides every morning. I made sure to keep well-hydrated during rides, and throughout the day to quell hunger. For the first few weeks, It was hard to keep motivated, because I felt sapped of energy, but it wasn't long until I felt more energetic throughout the day, and that my cycling routine was necessary to get my going in the mornings.

    ...and of course, there is a psychological factor - if you go about it every day thinking that it is a chore and/or burden,, then you'll never escape the psychological rut
     
  13. yurikahanachi

    yurikahanachi New Member

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    You definitely need some supplements to boost up your energy
     
  14. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

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    Based on what?
     
  15. swampy1970

    swampy1970 Well-Known Member

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    ... information given to him by the guy at GNC that sold him a $54 bottle of vitamins.
     
  16. deanbar

    deanbar New Member

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    Look for the Perfect 10 Diet book on Amazon.com -- balance your diet and hormones. Guy makes a lot of sense.
     
  17. bulaboy

    bulaboy New Member

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    Interesting topic. I've been running into the same issue. I've been restricting calories for 3 weeks now and my trainer rides are done at about the same wattage but rpe and HR are going up. Especially HR. Someone has already mentioned the timing of your caloric intake and that c/b it. I'm going to try to get more calories prior to and during wo's and see if that makes a diff. Another thing that I believe must also play a role is the quality of your food. If the volume is down then the nutrient value needs to go up. It becomes more important to eat nutrient dense foods. Pasta has lots of carbohydrate but is nutrient poor. Added fats in the form of salad dressing or mayo on your sandwich has 9 cals per gram but little or no nutrients. Where are the calories being cut? You can't eliminate the salads and keep the ice cream if you are asking your body to perform at a high level. Your percentage of leafy greens and fruits needs to go up when total calories goes down. My 2 cents.
     
  18. will loose

    will loose New Member

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    I am not a hard core cyclist i am just getting back into it but i am a life long athlete and weight lifter and also a diabetic. You might want to try some whole grain carbs before training brown rice, 10 grain breads ,whole grain pastas . Carbs that are not complex ( pretty much anytihing that is white ) will break down and spike 3 time faster than a whole grain or complex carbs .
     
  19. awilki01

    awilki01 New Member

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    Indoor trainer rides and RPE/HR increase could be attributed to lack of cooling. Get some good fans and try again.
     
  20. awilki01

    awilki01 New Member

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    I have a hunch I may be intolerant of gluten. I'm still testing that theory. But, when I eat whole wheat pasta, well.....er, my wife doesn't want to be anywhere around me. Beano helps alot.
     
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