Weight Loss help

Discussion in 'Health Nutrition and Supplements' started by rsalazar, Jul 12, 2003.

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  1. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Something that differs between fat and carbohydrate metabolism is the rate at which energy can be supplied. Energy is supplied at a very slow rate while carbohydrate at a faster rate. When you have the bonk you slow down to the speed at which energy can be supplied by fat.

    Obviously, if you ride slowly enough you could go on forever without eating carbohydrate as the rate of carbohydrate use would be quite slow and so can have endurance without being glycogen loaded. On the other hand, higher intensities require energy from carbohydrates and fat to fuel the muscular contractions so quickly lead to glycogen depletion and the knock.

    Without carbohydrate in the diet the body simply can't perform at these higher intenisties for very long or on repeated days. The need for carbohydrate in exercise performance has never been questioned; unlike the questions about the role of CHO during weight loss and health (i.e. the basis of the Atkins diet).

    Sorry for the simple reply (I have just come in from training) I can expand if you wish.
     


  2. Ellenz

    Ellenz New Member

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    Thanks so much! I will keep that in mind. No harm was intended.
     
  3. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    :) No probs, you can join my team in the promotion of carbohydrates.
     
  4. SoCalCruising

    SoCalCruising New Member

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    It's been a long time since I sat for exercise phys., but I did do grad-level work in that area. As I recall, one of the results of the "training effect" was a shift to higher usage of fats as an energy substrate while at rest, thus allowing the body to conserve carbs for the bout of work. I have always used this in dietary "strategy". When I want to lose fat, I exercise hard (aerobically) and reduce fat intake. It is comforting to think that I am burning more fat while typing this than I would if I wasn't training. Before you comment, I realize that the lowering of calories is ultimately responsible for the weight loss. What I said was that it is comforting to know that I am "liberating" fats from storage with this strategy.

    I am generally, as you may guess, on the side of a low-fat, roughly 60/40 carb/protein split diet. It just melts fat for me. Others may well be different. In fact I know they are. My son-in-law can eat huge amounts and stay thin, while his wife (my daughter) works her butt off and gains weight by looking at food (a bit of an exaggeration).

    I'd really like to add that there has been little (but some) talk about ruffage and its importance in the diet. Last I looked, long transit times in the gut were associated with colon desease, specifically colon cancer, while high motility rates had the opposite correlation. Ruffage aids motility, when combined with copious amounts of water. Anyone on a low-carb diet, without supplimemts (e.g., wheat bran), will be challenged to eat enough ruffage. High ruffage diets also reduce the gut's efficiency of digestion (from something like 97% for most folks, to 5-6% or so less, on average). So, I believe that a well-rounded diet should be recommended, and one that includes adequate amounts of ruffage (i.e., resulting in 18-24 hr. transit times for ingested foods).
     
  5. blocka

    blocka New Member

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    I would simply add that if you read through all of these posts you will find directly conflicting advice. To me, the bottom line is that each person is different, and hard and fast rules are destined to be broken. However, as a general guideline, if you put in a great deal more energy than you burn, some of it will stay with you in the form of excess weight. If you burn more than you take in, you will lose some of that excess weight.

    Personally, I also find that eating anything and everything in moderation helps as does drinking a fair amount of water each day. But that is just me.
     
  6. 531

    531 New Member

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    a body building diet from the twenties that i have had good results goes something like this;


    -lots of low fat carbs before training
    -frequent small meals for ease of digestion and increased motabolism
    -mostly non meat for fast digestion so that you can get training

    which looks like;

    -porridge and fruit for breaky
    -rice and legumes with lots of vegies for lunch
    -fruit juice and nofat milk by the litre

    you will develop methods of storing food with you. avoid being hungry, always eat and always eat withing 20 minutes of training. this will really get you going, you'll notice a difference in training performance.

    at the end of the day when your training is finnished and sleep is approaching the program changes to;

    -protein rich food for muscle repair
    -no carbohydrates for glycogen depletion
    -heavy green vegies for pranic energy (wide eyed and bushy tailed)
    -fruit juice and nofat milk by the litre

    which looks like;

    -steak (salmon, portahouse, chicken fillet, etc...)
    -huge plate of vegies

    this will feel strange at first having meat and no rice or pasta. you might feel really hungry after a normal portion. increase the amount but resist the tempation to eat carbs. this is the secret to getting super lean. all day you have been carb loading and burning energy in training so your motabolism is sky high. at night you fuel up with protein and iron and stop the supply of glycogen. while you sleep your raging motabolism eats all the energy in your system and nothing turns to fat.

    the more strict you are the better it works and it's a diet that is sustainable. to get leaner make the changeover from carbs to protein sooner. depending on your training timetable, 6pm might be a good time to change. to get leaner you might bring it back to 5pm. that one hour makes a big difference to your results and to how much energy you have in that part of the day so figure it out first.

    if you have a big competion the following day continue to carb load into the evening and your body will store energy for the next day.
     
  7. 2LAP

    2LAP New Member

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    Thread closed due to its length.

    If you have any opinions or unanswered questions on this topic please post them in a new thread.
     
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