Weight Loss help



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HellonWheels

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Aug 1, 2003
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Originally posted by SCOOBA STEVE
YOU DONT NEED CARBS. I LOST 40 POUNDS ON THE ATKINS DIET AND STILL TRAINED AND RACED FINE. CARBS KILL

NOT having carbs almost killed me. I bonked once on my exercise bike from not taking in enough carbs, fell off the bike and hit my head on the bed footboard.

I think the Atkins movement is a cult, akin to Scientology. I've never seen people proselytize a form of eating the way they proselytize that.

There is nothing that beats a regular low-fat (NOT no-fat!) eating plan, moderate portions, fresh, healthy food, plenty of complex carbs. Its what all reputable medical professionals and health organizations recommend.
 

Shabby

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Mar 13, 2003
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Originally posted by JAPANic

Tell me one carnivorous animal that has good stamina?

Milk is for cows. Otherwise women would have been given udders.

Lions? Cheetahs?

Women do have udders. They're known as breasts.

Your logic is childish.

Man, ten times smarter than a gorilla. Perhaps they need more sausages?

Why do animals eat herbivores? Becuase they can catch them and they don't have the teeth to fight back.
 

Harrow

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Jun 17, 2003
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Originally posted by JAPANic
If you stop eating carbs you will (should) lose weight.
If you stop eating fat you will (should) lose weight.
If you stop eating protein you will (should) lose weight.
Excellent point, if you stop eating everything you will (may) lose weight. I know a few people who will be delighted to hear that their weight problems have been solved.

Originally posted by JAPANic
All carnivorous animals eat herbivores?
Why?
They are healthier to eat. They have all the good vitamins.
Well if they have all the good vitamins, I think I'll eat them too. Now, where did I put that burger...?

Originally posted by JAPANic
Milk is for cows. Otherwise women would have been given udders.
Isn't milk for mammals, which includes...er.....humans?

Originally posted by JAPANic
I think the secret to having a happy eating life is to have a very fast metabolism...
Hey, you forgot fast cars, fast women and a fast internet connection!

Originally posted by JAPANic
I also read the books on eating for your blood types. There seems to be some sense to this as well....
Good in theory but my local butcher refuses to label his sirloin as blood type 'A' ,'B' and 'O', etc.

Thanks for the laugh. You are an absolute classic. Keep it coming.

Regards,
Harrow.
 

JAPANic

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Aug 11, 2003
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Originally posted by Shabby
Lions? Cheetahs?

Women do have udders. They're known as breasts.

Your logic is childish.

Man, ten times smarter than a gorilla. Perhaps they need more sausages?

Why do animals eat herbivores? Becuase they can catch them and they don't have the teeth to fight back.

Lions and Cheetahs are puffed after 2 minutes on the run. No stamina at all. After eating they have to sleep for 10 hours to digest all the protein.

Your wife may have an udder or two but mine has breasts. Cows milk is for cows!

I'll put my horse against your lion in a race anyday.

Gorillas are dumb, I'll give you that much, but there are plenty of humans around who aren't as smart as a gorilla.
Do you know what is in a sausage? Unless you've made it yourself you have no idea what you are eating...

Not, my childish logic, any of this. It is all fact; and I don't think you can say that any of what I said is not true.

Now I know what a meat head is.... I hope eating sausages isn't some kind of phallic symbol?

I am not a herbivore BTW....:D ;)
 

art_babe

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Jul 23, 2003
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i've been a herbivore for 13 years and i'm fine. True, my iron levels are *slightly* below normal but that may because i'm a woman.

i agree with JAPANic, cow's milk is for cows; milk is bad. Cow's are pumped full of horomones to produce the amount of milk they do, In return, you consume those hormones. Recent studies show that teenage girls are "maturing" earlier than ever before because of the hormones present in cow's milk and beef.

In regards to the Atkin's diet, sure you'll lose weight initially because of cut calories, but once you're off the diet, you'll gain it back. i've seen it happen all too often.

A healthy and balanced lifestyle with training/exercise always works.
 

Miller

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Aug 4, 2003
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That last post contains one of the most ridiculous lines I think I've ever heard: "Milk is for cows. Otherwise women would have been given udders." Obviously, this person is single. Woman have breasts! Same thing!

Also: like it or not, human beings are carnivors. Horses cannot eat steak -- they can't digest it. We can. Get used to it -- humans eat animal protein. That's why we live in organized communities and have language and laws and culture -- precisely because we're not horses.
 

JAPANic

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That's why we live in organized communities and have language and laws and culture -- precisely because we're not horses.

And I thought it had something to do with greed!
Now I know the meaning of life!
Thanks. That beats my line by a mile!


That last post contains one of the most ridiculous lines I think I've ever heard: "Milk is for cows.

You mean 'milk isn't for cows'?. I'm confused!


You should study the history of food..... (simpified here for you).

First were fruits & vegetables.... Over population growth problems caused a lack of naturally available food and hunting was invented (necesity).... Game was not always available so farming was invented..... more fruits, vegetables and then grain. Then animals were farmed. Dairy products came last....
 

marion

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Jun 22, 2003
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you forgot to add.........then over the years the farmers failed to maintain the land to mother natures specs.......

This is why we are needing to take micro nutrients. half the world suffers from grade 2 malnutrition, as for the history of food mmmm very interesting xx
 

2LAP

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Feb 22, 2002
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Originally posted by SCOOBA STEVE
YOU DONT NEED CARBS. I LOST 40 POUNDS ON THE ATKINS DIET AND STILL TRAINED AND RACED FINE. CARBS KILL

Actualy, you would have lost weight due to a reduced calorie intake. This may have been acheived by reducing carbohydrate intake.

The comment 'YOU DON'T NEED CARBS' is factualy incorrect, many people don't realise that they are eating carbs or use the generic 'carbs' to describe simple or complex carbs.

Carbs are essential for exercise and healthy life (within a healthy and balanced diet).

This tread has gone a bit off topic, think its about time it closed.
 

HellonWheels

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Aug 1, 2003
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Originally posted by 2LAP
Actualy, you would have lost weight due to a reduced calorie intake. This may have been acheived by reducing carbohydrate intake.

The comment 'YOU DON'T NEED CARBS' is factualy incorrect, many people don't realise that they are eating carbs or use the generic 'carbs' to describe simple or complex carbs.

Carbs are essential for exercise and healthy life (within a healthy and balanced diet).

This tread has gone a bit off topic, think its about time it closed.

I agree totally about carbs. Incidentally, a gram of carbs has LESS calories than a gram of fat...for those who have an interest in weight loss. Makes more sense to cut the fat, not the (complex) carbs.
 

Renae

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Aug 8, 2003
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I personally tried doing Atkins, after telling people how bad it was for you, I finally gave in an tried it as the promise of quick weight loss intrigued me since I wasn't having any luck other ways. Yes, I did lose weight, yes I did keep it off for a little while (only gained a couple pounds of it back), but I had to stop as after a couple weeks I started to feel horrible (headaches, difficulty sleeping). Now, I have attempted to restart it a couple times, and I can hardly make it 3 days before I start to feel horrible again...it is just not worth it to me to feel that way.
Someone that I work with took up cycling and lost a lot of weight. We always saw her drinking her Pepsi and eating pretty much whatever she wanted, but didn't understand how she was still losing weight. She actually started using the Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Loss Program: http://www.mayoclinic.com/planners/plannergateway.cfm?objectID=C427B613-787D-4AFA-BE20F60BED3A9CC2
It is not the old 'Mayo Clinic Diet' where you eat cabbage or grapefruit all the time. All that it is is making you aware of what you are eating. It tells you how many servings of carbs, proteins, veggies, etc. that you can have per day, and if you want you can print of sheets for each day and write down what you ate and mark off how many servings of whatever you had that day. It is no miracle diet, your not going to lose 10 pounds in two weeks, but she stuck with it and succeeded, and now it is just a way of life for her. I tried it, and am planning on doing it again, as while I did it before I did well (until I went on vacation). You also kind of watch your calorie intake for the day, mine was set for 1200 calories, and I didn't have a problem with that. If you know you are going to go out to dinner, just eat healthier during the day so that you can eat whatever that night.
I know someone that has lost 100+ pounds on the Atkins diet. She is still doing the diet so that she may maintain her weight loss. But, it is a lifelong commitment for her to do that as once she stops the Atkins, she will most likely start to gain it back again. My mom is doing the 'South Beach Diet'. She is doing well on that. I have heard it compared to Atkins, but in all reality, she eats a whole lot healthier that I did when I did Atkins. She doesn't care about the carbs in a food, she cares about the sugars, and she looks at the nutrition information, and if the calories are too high, it really is not worth eating it because just because it doesn't have much for sugar, it still may be high in fat and calories.
 

2LAP

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Feb 22, 2002
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Good post Renae, as you say cut the calories and you will lose weight. Most diets work (because they reduce calorie intake) if you stick to them in the long term. Its just that some diets are healthier than others (these are not usualy the fad diets) and some are better for cycling performance (diets with carbohydrates)!
 

HellonWheels

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Aug 1, 2003
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Originally posted by Renae
I personally tried doing Atkins, after telling people how bad it was for you, I finally gave in an tried it as the promise of quick weight loss intrigued me since I wasn't having any luck other ways. Yes, I did lose weight, yes I did keep it off for a little while (only gained a couple pounds of it back), but I had to stop as after a couple weeks I started to feel horrible (headaches, difficulty sleeping). Now, I have attempted to restart it a couple times, and I can hardly make it 3 days before I start to feel horrible again...it is just not worth it to me to feel that way.
Someone that I work with took up cycling and lost a lot of weight. We always saw her drinking her Pepsi and eating pretty much whatever she wanted, but didn't understand how she was still losing weight. She actually started using the Mayo Clinic Healthy Weight Loss Program: Personally, I don't understand w...f course thats why I'm here on this forum! :)
 

booyah

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Aug 11, 2003
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Originally posted by HellonWheels
And (get this), I wasnt even trying to lose weight (what I mean is, weight loss was not my goal).

This is probably the best comment I've read in this whole thread.

I'm trying to get rid of a bit of weight these days. I'd put on to about 240 over the last four years. Healthy weight for me when I'm fit is around 195-200. I went to Weight Watchers with my wife for a while, and it made me realize I wanted something more than just losing weight. Losing weight wasn't my main goal - getting fit and feeling good was! Weight Watchers is a great system to get a kick-start with, and focuses your mind and body on what is good/bad to eat. Trouble was, they want me to be 185 (ain't gonna happen in this lifetime with my build), and don't take fitness and muscle mass into account too well.

Removing weight targets from my 'lifestyle change' has been the best thing I've ever done. The last four weeks, I've ridden about 400 miles, plus spend about 4 hours in the MTB saddle every Sunday out on a single track somewhere and do a weights program three times a week. I feel great, I'm getting fitter, and the 'weight' is disappearing from the right places - where the fat is! ...and appearing in the right places - where the muscle needs to be.

My current goal is completing my first metric century before Christmas.
 

HellonWheels

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Aug 1, 2003
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Originally posted by booyah
This is probably the best comment I've read in this whole thread.

I'm trying to get rid of a bit of weight these days. I'd put on to about 240 over the last four years. Healthy weight for me when I'm fit is around 195-200. I went to Weight Watchers with my wife for a while, and it made me realize I wanted something more than just losing weight. Losing weight wasn't my main goal - getting fit and feeling good was! Weight Watchers is a great system to get a kick-start with, and focuses your mind and body on what is good/bad to eat. Trouble was, they want me to be 185 (ain't gonna happen in this lifetime with my build), and don't take fitness and muscle mass into account too well.

Removing weight targets from my 'lifestyle change' has been the best thing I've ever done. >>>>

Way to GO! :) THAT is the true secret to lasting weight loss--not making it a goal.

As the Zen saying goes, The more you seek something, the harder it will be to find it. :) When you focus on weight loss, you subconsciously feel deprived, punished, being denied food for being "bad" in terms of weight gain.

When you focus on being healthy and energetic, you don't feel like you are being punished...because you are not doing anything different than what many thin people do. I am very proud of the fact that not once have I ever gone on any weight loss diet...not Weight Watchers, Atkins, none of them. To me that is a sign of willpower...because I tend to see weight loss dieters as weakminded people (a lot of that has to do with my childhood growing up with a mother who was really emotionally torn apart by the guilt WW used to pile on their members.) The diet industry is a SHAM and a moneymaking racket. HEALTHY eating and exercise is the only thing that works because it is a lifestyle change. And its FREE!
 

MEAUX

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Jul 24, 2003
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There is an answer, one must always follow the simple rule of the amount of calories going in should not exceed the amount of calories going out, how do you do this? Exersice and not diet but eat healthy. It takes a ave. person approx. 1 year to gain 15 pounds so it will take an ave person to loss that in about 6 months, with exercise and healthy eating. JUST KEEP WORKING HARD AT IT!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
 

serottarider

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Jul 11, 2003
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Our ancestors, for many hundreds of thousands of years until the relatively recent past, were hunter-gatherers. Their diet was a mixture of scavenged and/or hunted insects, reptiles, fish, animals and fowl, plus seasonal roots, herbs, berries and foliage. While they may have eaten some grain based foods they certainly didn't eat much of it, and what they did eat was highly seasonal. Grain simply wasn't available all the time. They didn't eat a lot of dairy food either - it was probably quite challenging to try to milk an aurochs.

Agriculture appeared relatively recently - some time around 7,000 - 8,000 years ago - which is far too short a time for our species as a whole to adapt to such a radical dietary change. Evolution just doesn't work that fast.

Archeological evidence clearly shows the adverse effect on the human population of the effects of the "Neolithic revolution" - the introduction of agriculture. A significant reduction in height, loss of bone density and tooth decay appear at the same time as agro-foods were introduced into the human diet. We've seen the same efects in more recent times on the Inuit, the Kalahari bushmen and the Native American population. Significantly among the latter are the Pima, Hopi and Navajo, among whom the rates of diabetes are staggering.

The fact is that our evolutionary physiology has not as yet caught up with our genetic heritage. We are, from an evolutionary viewpoint, stone age men and women in 21st century clothing.

It's significant that, in spite of the supposedly healthy grain-based food pyramid touted by the current American government and its obedient nutritionists, the American population today has a higher rate of obesity, notably in the juvenile population, than at any time in recorded history. Maybe the fact that America is a huge grain-producing nation has something to do with it. Europe has the same issues.

It's refined carbs that are doing the damage. White bread, polished rice, high fructose corn syrup and the other high-glycemic refined junk in the "civilized" diet all serve to stress the pancreas and other elements of the various human energy-producing mechanisms. Trans fats are another evil.

Satiety isn't happening as it's supposed to because the lack of fiber and the lack of "natural" fats in the modern diet mean that the "I'm full" message we are supposed to generate just doesn't happen soon enough and so we tend to overeat. We're designed that way. The lack of exercise, significantly in the juvenile population as well as nationally, exacerbates this sad state of affairs and compounds the rush towards a fat industrialized world.

You can't mess with nature - it always bites back.

Each of us has to make his or her own dietary choices. We aren't a one-size-fits-all species. There are many individual populations, each with their own idiosyncracies. Certain ethnic groups have a higher rate of lactose intolerance, for instance, while others are sensitive to the nightshades - potato, peppers, tomatoes, eggplant et al. Some populations handle refined carbohydrates better than others.

You may personally handle refined carbohydrate fairly well. I don't, and there are many others out there with the same problem. Like I said, one size doesn't fit everyone.

The bottom line, however, is that the human body needs food. If we eat more than we use we gain weight. If we eat less we'll lose weight. It's all about doing the math and making good dietary choices......
 

Phil Whirley

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Aug 15, 2003
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RSalazar,

Several years ago I rode the MS150 from Houston to Austin after years of not riding. I am 6'0" and weighed (at that time) 275lbs at the age of 45. In my twenties I had been a very strong club rider (150-200 miles per week), but as you can tell, I was no longer fit.

First, start stretching now. This will help you avoid injury, regardless of how overweight you are. The ride is a lot of fun, even at a slow pace, if you don't injure yourself.

Second, pick the diet method you want to use and stick with it. I chose Adkins and have been very pleased with my success. It's been around for 30 years, so it hardly qualifies as a "fad" diet anymore. However, if you can get the low-fat diet to work for you, that's probably even better. The trick is to find the one that you can stick with! Find a group to support you.

Third, plan your food ahead of time. For example, in the morning, map out *exactly* what you're going to eat that day and write it down. Make sure you have access to it. Don't ever get caught hungry without knowing what you're planning to eat.

Fourth, write it all down. If you keep a food diary, you are much more likely to stick with the diet. I use BalanceLog by HealthETech (www.healthetech.com) on my PDA to log my food intake.

Fifth, spend as much time in the saddle as you can between now and the ride, but DON'T try to push too hard. Concentrate on spending time in the saddle, not riding fast. You want to gradually build up stamina, not hurt yourself. The more time your butt has to get used to the saddle, the more fun the trip will be. Make sure you invest in some good padded gel shorts and a good gel saddle. Also get some good gel gloves. It will make a difference.

Lastly, don't get hung up about a weight-loss goal. Don't try to be trim and fit by the time you do the big ride. Concentrate instead on how much better you feel every day as you eat properly. You want the weight to come off slowly as you establish long-term patterns of proper eating.

BTW, if you are riding the MS150 from Houston to Austin, it's really 180 miles!
 
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