Weightweenieness

Discussion in 'Recumbent bicycles' started by Mikael Seierup, Oct 16, 2003.

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  1. Just did the math on my VK1 -> VK2 frameswap.

    If I splurge for a new fork with carbonsteerer while I'm there I will save... wait for it... 730
    grammes! Yay! (If the weight of 2300 g for the VK2 frame is correct.)

    Also by switching to an offset fork with a caliper brake there should be ~250 grammes to loose.
    (Drumbrakehub 760 g. Shimano 105 hub and caliper: 501 g.)

    So 11-11.5 kg should be within reach. Go me!

    Then theres small stuff like swapping my toolcollection for a compact multitool. Lightened the load
    a bit. Stelvios instead of S-Licks maybe if durability and comfort is not compromised too much. I
    like riding the odd gravelroad.

    Mikael
     
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  2. Cletus Lee

    Cletus Lee Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Then theres small stuff like swapping my toolcollection for a compact multitool. Lightened the
    > load a bit. Stelvios instead of S-Licks maybe if durability and comfort is not compromised too
    > much. I like riding the odd gravelroad.
    >

    I don't like riding the 'odd gravelroad'. I don't know if tire weight has anything to do with it or
    having a larger ground patch, but I can see a speed difference on my Voyager when shod with Stelvios
    vs. S-Licks. Not much mind you but perhaps 1.0 kph average in 75-80 km. This is a speed penalty I am
    willing to pay if very much of my regular routine involves the 'odd gravelroad'.

    Of course those fortunate to have two bikes can opt for different tires/bike for different trips.

    And different tool kits. My tool kit for touring is very different than the one I carry on my daily
    commute about town,

    --

    Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  3. "Cletus Lee" skrev

    > I don't like riding the 'odd gravelroad'. I don't know if tire weight has anything to do with it
    > or having a larger ground patch, but I can see a speed difference on my Voyager when shod with
    > Stelvios vs. S-Licks. Not much mind you but perhaps 1.0 kph average in 75-80 km. This is a speed
    > penalty I am willing to pay if very much of my regular routine involves the 'odd gravelroad'.

    Well the Stelvios are for the annual championship unless I go to some of the other races. S-Licks
    are not too hot for gravelroads either unless I slow down but usually I take them to enjoy the
    forest or what have you so no problem there. I did put a wide lowpressure tire on the front of the
    old Evita-2 once instead of the S-Licks ( 20 x 1.75 40 psi Chen Shing if memory serves me correctly)
    and this improved grip and speed on gravel measurably.

    If I freak totally I still got the TE-clone set up with a wide lo-pres front and a knobby rear I
    used at the hillclimb in Sweden. Should serve me well come winter. Right now we're just coming to
    the end of a period with a stationary highpressure system. Been blue skies and sunny with fairly
    light wind all week. Temps around 9-12 Celcius and glorious yellow and red colors on the trees. Will
    snap a pic tomorrow if I remember.

    Mikael
     
  4. L.A.

    L.A. Guest

    or different wheelsets. Lon

    Cletus Lee wrote:
    >
    > In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > > Then theres small stuff like swapping my toolcollection for a compact multitool. Lightened the
    > > load a bit. Stelvios instead of S-Licks maybe if durability and comfort is not compromised too
    > > much. I like riding the odd gravelroad.
    > >
    >
    > I don't like riding the 'odd gravelroad'. I don't know if tire weight has anything to do with it
    > or having a larger ground patch, but I can see a speed difference on my Voyager when shod with
    > Stelvios vs. S-Licks. Not much mind you but perhaps 1.0 kph average in 75-80 km. This is a speed
    > penalty I am willing to pay if very much of my regular routine involves the 'odd gravelroad'.
    >
    > Of course those fortunate to have two bikes can opt for different tires/bike for different trips.
    >
    > And different tool kits. My tool kit for touring is very different than the one I carry on my
    > daily commute about town,
    >
    > --
    >
    > Cletus D. Lee Bacchetta Giro Lightning Voyager http://www.clee.org
    > - Bellaire, TX USA -
     
  5. Jeff Wills

    Jeff Wills Guest

    "Mikael Seierup" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    >
    > If I freak totally I still got the TE-clone set up with a wide lo-pres front and a knobby rear I
    > used at the hillclimb in Sweden. Should serve me well come winter.

    Mikeal-

    If your clone is built like a standard Tour Easy, it should accomodate some really fat tires. Last
    weekend I was riding with a friend who has a 700 x 47 rear tire and a 20 x 2.0 front tire. It served
    him well on the ride- 15 miles of rough gravel road followed by 30 miles of pavement.

    FWIW: I was riding my suspended mountain bike. Cushy, but my butt was sore by the end of the day.

    Jeff
     
  6. "Jeff Wills" skrev

    > If your clone is built like a standard Tour Easy, it should accomodate some really fat tires. Last
    > weekend I was riding with a friend who has a 700 x 47 rear tire and a 20 x 2.0 front tire. It
    > served him well on the ride- 15 miles of rough gravel road followed by 30 miles of pavement.

    26 x 1.95 very knobby rear and 20 x 1.75 front. So wide I can't use first gear or mount a
    kickstand actually. http://uk.f1.pg.photos.yahoo.com/briangoebbels (recumbents folder) or
    http://www.liggister.org/grusloppet/ for a pic or two of me whupping the swedes in the
    hillclimb ;) )

    Mikael
     
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