Weird slow leak.?

Discussion in 'Cycling Equipment' started by Paulus, Mar 4, 2004.

  1. Paulus

    Paulus Guest

    Anybody know what is going on here?

    If I pump up my tube and tyre it will stay pumped up for at least a week if I do not ride my bike.
    When I ride my bike, the wheel stayed pumped up. About 10 minutes after I get off my bike, the tyre
    goes flat in about 5 minutes, but if I pump it up and do not ride it, the tyre stays inflated!

    Anyone had this happen before?

    Paul
     
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  2. crazy6r54

    crazy6r54 Guest

    Take the tube out, run your fingers in side the tire. Run those fingers over every inch of the
    inside of the tire over and over looking for sharpe objects to prick your finger. The likes of
    glass,wire, metal, ect. You find any of these things pull it out with tweezer or neddlenose pliers.
    Find hole in tube and patch it or replace with new tube.

    I MTB 2004
     
  3. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 22:03:20 +1100, "Paulus" <[email protected]> may
    have said:

    >Anybody know what is going on here?
    >
    >If I pump up my tube and tyre it will stay pumped up for at least a week if I do not ride my bike.
    >When I ride my bike, the wheel stayed pumped up. About 10 minutes after I get off my bike, the tyre
    >goes flat in about 5 minutes, but if I pump it up and do not ride it, the tyre stays inflated!
    >
    >Anyone had this happen before?

    Carefully inspect the tube at the base of the valve. I suspect you'll find your leak there.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
  4. Allan Butler

    Allan Butler Guest

    Paul

    One other possibility is that the rim tape is not covering the nipple holes in your rim.

    Check to make certain that there is no place for the tube to work through into the cavity where
    anipple is. Even a REAL SMALL space will let this happen.
     
  5. Carl Fogel

    Carl Fogel Guest

    Werehatrack <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 22:03:20 +1100, "Paulus" <[email protected]> may have said:
    >
    > >Anybody know what is going on here?
    > >
    > >If I pump up my tube and tyre it will stay pumped up for at least a week if I do not ride my
    > >bike. When I ride my bike, the wheel stayed pumped up. About 10 minutes after I get off my bike,
    > >the tyre goes flat in about 5 minutes, but if I pump it up and do not ride it, the tyre stays
    > >inflated!
    > >
    > >Anyone had this happen before?
    >
    > Carefully inspect the tube at the base of the valve. I suspect you'll find your leak there.

    Dear Werehatrack,

    Even if this base-of-the-valve idea isn't the solution, I like it.

    But what's the explanation? Or basis?

    Carl Fogel
     
  6. Zeeexsixare

    Zeeexsixare Guest

    > But what's the explanation? Or basis?

    I had a flat near the valve stem. I used a glueless patch and a C-clamp to smash the whole thing
    down. It's the only way I've been able to get glueless patches to work correctly.

    In this case, when I C-clamped the thing down near the stem, I inadvertently severed the stem from
    the tube. It wasn't immediately visible, so when I pumped up the tube, it held until 40psi. Then
    PSSSSSSSSSSSSHHHH as if the patch had failed. I said, "glueless never again!" and took it out,
    surprised to find that the patch was intact and just fine. I pumped it up again, PSSSHH...

    I went over the whole tube while inflated and noticed the air coming out when I was near the stem.
    I played around and found the hole. It didn't leak air unless the thick rubber was pulled apart
    either by compression on one side or twisting or by >40psi pressures. Needless to say, I had to
    dump that one.

    --
    Phil, Squid-in-Training
     
  7. Werehatrack

    Werehatrack Guest

    On Thu, 4 Mar 2004 20:48:54 -0500, "ZeeExSixAre"
    <[email protected]> may have said:

    >> But what's the explanation? Or basis?
    >
    >I had a flat near the valve stem. I used a glueless patch and a C-clamp to smash the whole thing
    >down. It's the only way I've been able to get glueless patches to work correctly.
    >
    >In this case, when I C-clamped the thing down near the stem, I inadvertently severed the stem from
    >the tube. It wasn't immediately visible, so when I pumped up the tube, it held until 40psi. Then
    >PSSSSSSSSSSSSHHHH as if the patch had failed. I said, "glueless never again!" and took it out,
    >surprised to find that the patch was intact and just fine. I pumped it up again, PSSSHH...
    >
    >I went over the whole tube while inflated and noticed the air coming out when I was near the stem.
    >I played around and found the hole. It didn't leak air unless the thick rubber was pulled apart
    >either by compression on one side or twisting or by >40psi pressures. Needless to say, I had to
    >dump that one.

    Bingo. I had something very similar happen to me. Leaks anywhere else tend to be fairly
    straightforward; pump up, leak down. In the area at the base of the valve, they can behave oddly.

    --
    My email address is antispammed; pull WEEDS if replying via e-mail.
    Typoes are not a bug, they're a feature.
    Words processed in a facility that contains nuts.
     
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