Western medicine vs Chinese medicine

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Dave, Oct 7, 2003.

  1. Dave

    Dave Guest

    In the last century (the age of Western medicine) Western medicine developed
    into a science with a very narrow focus: researching
    separate clinical issues and curing the symptoms of disease. In America it
    has turned into an "expensive equipment" kind of medicine that is not
    affrordable by many. Human beings as physical
    and psychological entities have receded into the background. Measures to
    maintain health and prevent disease have not received adequate attention. As
    a result, the past decade has seen a growing
    interest in naturopathy, (w)holistic medicine and traditional Chinese
    medicine (5000 years of practice).

    Health is, according to Chinese doctors, the equilibrium of body and soul.
    Unlike Western medicine, Chinese medicine does not focus primarily on the
    treatment of an illness. Instead it focuses on the entire person....the
    unity of body, mind and soul. Chinese medicine recognizes that illness is
    only one manifestation of an imbalance that exists in the person as a whole.

    The underlying philosophy of Chinese medicine is that we live between
    heaven and earth, and comprise a miniature universe within ourselves. The
    material of which living things are made is considered to belong to the Yin,
    or the female, passive aspect of nature. On the other hand, the life
    functions of living things are considered to belong to Yang, or the
    masculine, active, advancing aspect of nature. Yin and Yang are not opposing
    forces, they belong together. We all carry both Yin and Yang aspects within
    ourselves. If Yin and Yang are in equilibrium, this leads tom overall health
    and well-being. If they are out of balance, illness and disease occur.
     
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  2. Hawki63

    Hawki63 Guest

    >Subject: Western medicine vs Chinese medicine
    >From: "Dave" [email protected]
    >Date: 10/7/2003 7:27 AM Pacific Daylight Time
    >Message-id: <[email protected]>



    DAVEY

    who did you copy this from???

    look up plagurism,,,,copyright law...etc etc


    hawki
     
  3. David Wright

    David Wright Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    Dave <[email protected]> wrote:
    >In the last century (the age of Western medicine) Western medicine developed
    >into a science with a very narrow focus: researching
    >separate clinical issues and curing the symptoms of disease. In America it
    >has turned into an "expensive equipment" kind of medicine that is not
    >affrordable by many. Human beings as physical
    >and psychological entities have receded into the background. Measures to
    >maintain health and prevent disease have not received adequate attention. As
    >a result, the past decade has seen a growing
    >interest in naturopathy, (w)holistic medicine and traditional Chinese
    >medicine (5000 years of practice).


    The trouble with setting up Chinese medicine as the be-all and end-all
    of health is that it was never very good at dealing with infectious
    disease, for example. Or conditions requiring surgery. The Chinese
    people, who can be a pragmatic lot, are not at all averse to using
    western-style MDs.

    -- David Wright :: alphabeta at prodigy.net
    These are my opinions only, but they're almost always correct.
    "If I have not seen as far as others, it is because giants
    were standing on my shoulders." (Hal Abelson, MIT)
     
  4. Ilsa9

    Ilsa9 Guest

    >In article <[email protected]>,
    >Dave <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>In the last century (the age of Western medicine) Western medicine developed
    >>into a science with a very narrow focus: researching
    >>separate clinical issues and curing the symptoms of disease. In America it
    >>has turned into an "expensive equipment" kind of medicine that is not
    >>affrordable by many. Human beings as physical
    >>and psychological entities have receded into the background. Measures to
    >>maintain health and prevent disease have not received adequate attention. As
    >>a result, the past decade has seen a growing
    >>interest in naturopathy, (w)holistic medicine and traditional Chinese
    >>medicine (5000 years of practice).

    >
    >The trouble with setting up Chinese medicine as the be-all and end-all
    >of health is that it was never very good at dealing with infectious
    >disease, for example. Or conditions requiring surgery. The Chinese
    >people, who can be a pragmatic lot, are not at all averse to using
    >western-style MDs.


    Bingo! In modern times, Chinese medicine is more likely to prove useful for
    chronic, non-lifethreatening conditions. Often, it is best to go to your MD
    first for a proper diagnosis. If the treatment offered is not appropriate
    (allergy to the available meds, etc) or if there is no practical treatment from
    western medicine, then Chinese medicine _MAY_ be a good alternative.

    Chinese medicine offers a lot, but certain it does not offer everything to
    everyone.
     
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