Wet feet and sock drying!

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by Dave Moore, Sep 2, 2004.

  1. Dave Moore

    Dave Moore Guest

    Hi All,
    Just returned from a mid-wales backpack over the bank holiday which was
    pretty good. Had a bit of trouble (as I typically do) with my feet getting
    sore though. There seems to be a 'hot-spot' in the centre of each foot just
    below the toes, which after a 2 or 3 days will enevitably develop into a
    blister (with the associated pain). This doesn't seem to be boot dependant
    as it occurs whilst wearing either my leather or fabric boots.

    One thing I have noticed that I'm sure can't help is that my feet seem to be
    constantly wet either through sweat or water entering through the top of the
    boot. I find that I have to stop every couple of hours and take my boots
    off to let my feet cool down and try to dry off my socks. This was made
    worse this weekend when the weather was so wet (despite the weather forecast
    specifically saying that there would be NO rain!), that I no chance to dry
    socks out even overnight whilst wild camping. In fact, if anybody's got any
    ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be
    interested. Obviously there's a limit to the number of spare dry socks I can
    carry/afford!.

    Any ideas?.

    Cheers,
    Dave
     
    Tags:


  2. spongebob

    spongebob Guest

    "Dave Moore" <[email protected]> wrote

    <snip>

    In fact, if anybody's got any
    > ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really

    be
    > interested. Obviously there's a limit to the number of spare dry

    socks I can
    > carry/afford!.
    >
    > Any ideas?.


    Keeping socks dry can be a real pain on long journeys. Yeti gaiters
    seem to be the thing to have if you can afford them otherwise some
    good ordinary gaiters will stop rain from getting in as long as you
    wear your leggings on the outside (how many times do I see these
    tucked in?). Of course, the Yeti gaiters are brilliant for stream
    crossing if you have any of that to do. Assuming your socks are not
    saturated because the water is coming in from a fault in the boots you
    should be able to dry damp socks by keeping them in your sleeping bag
    overnight - your body heat should do the job nicely.

    Graham
     
  3. Dean

    Dean Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 20:01:21 +0100, Dave Moore wrote:

    >Hi All,
    > Just returned from a mid-wales backpack over the bank holiday which was
    >pretty good. Had a bit of trouble (as I typically do) with my feet getting
    >sore though. There seems to be a 'hot-spot' in the centre of each foot just
    >below the toes, which after a 2 or 3 days will enevitably develop into a
    >blister (with the associated pain). This doesn't seem to be boot dependant
    >as it occurs whilst wearing either my leather or fabric boots.
    >
    >One thing I have noticed that I'm sure can't help is that my feet seem to be
    >constantly wet either through sweat or water entering through the top of the
    >boot. I find that I have to stop every couple of hours and take my boots
    >off to let my feet cool down and try to dry off my socks. This was made
    >worse this weekend when the weather was so wet (despite the weather forecast
    >specifically saying that there would be NO rain!), that I no chance to dry
    >socks out even overnight whilst wild camping. In fact, if anybody's got any
    >ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be
    >interested. Obviously there's a limit to the number of spare dry socks I can
    >carry/afford!.
    >
    >Any ideas?.
    >
    >Cheers,
    >Dave



    I imagine most blisters develop when the part of the foot concerned moves
    relative to the area of the boot it is in contact with. Most blisters I've
    had have been on the heel - which seems to be the part most likely to move
    relative to the inside of the boot. Maybe you're erring in favour of
    slightly oversized boots? I think it's also got alot to do with wet feet as
    well since the skin always seems to get wrinkled when wet for a long time
    and maybe this exacerbates any rubbing? Tight(er) fitting socks as well as
    ones that fill out the boot nicely might help as well as a thin liner sock
    under your thick socks.
     
  4. Dave Moore wrote:

    > There seems to be a 'hot-spot' in the centre
    > of each foot just below the toes, which after a 2 or 3 days will
    > enevitably develop into a blister (with the associated pain).


    Join the club ... I got feet of the same type as yours, having enough
    time to regret myself on our wet C2C three weeks ago :)

    > One thing I have noticed that I'm sure can't help is that my feet
    > seem to be constantly wet either through sweat or water entering
    > through the top of the boot.


    As for the sweat problem, try another kind of socks material. Maybe you
    ought to wear thicker socks, too. The socks have to to absorb the sweat
    and lead it out of the boots (mostly up your legs to dry it off in the
    air).

    I haven't found the royal socks type for me so far.

    As for the water entering through the top, try to wear rain trousers :)

    > I find that I have to stop every couple of hours and take my boots
    > off to let my feet cool down and try to dry off my socks.


    That's a very good idea (I do it this way, too), but ...

    > This was made worse this weekend when the weather was so wet


    .... that's the nag.

    > (despite the weather forecast specifically saying that there would
    > be NO rain!),


    Obviously, the weather didn't listen to the radio. You never know if it
    did.

    > that I no chance to dry socks out even overnight whilst wild
    > camping. In fact, if anybody's got any ideas for drying out socks
    > in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be interested.


    After walking through the rain for hours with leaking boots, I had to
    wring my socks first thoroughly :) As soon as my feet got dry and warm
    in the tent, I put the socks on again, as the warmth of the feet helps
    them to dry (allow air circulation, of course - I usually open the
    lower end of my sleeping bag and let the feet stick out).

    > Obviously there's a limit to the number of spare dry socks I can
    > carry/afford!. Any ideas?.


    Buy a new set of socks from every shop that's on your way and throw
    away all the wet ones :)


    vG

    --
    ~~~~~~ Volker Gringmuth ~~~~~~~~~~~ http://einklich.net/ ~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
    "Ich lese übrigens immer weniger Big Eight und immer mehr de.ALL. Dürfte auch
    daran liegen, dass der oft als "typisch deutscher" Ungeist beschimpfte Geist von
    de. in der Tat dem Signalanteil gut tut." (Matthias Warkus in dang)
     
  5. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 20:01:21 +0100, "Dave Moore"
    <[email protected]> wrote:


    >In fact, if anybody's got any
    >ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be
    >interested.


    oh, that one is so-oo easy ;-)

    right... assuming you're not going commando, if you are then you're
    stuffed ;-)

    thread socks up inside of underpants, one sock 'down' each leg, so to
    speak, and tuck top of socks into elastic waist of underpants: keeps
    them there all night, driza bone in the morning :)

    If the thought makes you wince just prepare yourself by thinking of
    wet socks, or not, in the morning ;-)





    SteveO

    NE Climbers & walkers chat forum;
    http://www.thenmc.org.uk/phpBB2/index.php

    NMC website: http://www.thenmc.org.uk
     
  6. Phil Cook

    Phil Cook Guest

    On Thu, 02 Sep 2004 20:11:24 GMT, spongebob wrote:

    >Keeping socks dry can be a real pain on long journeys. Yeti gaiters
    >seem to be the thing to have if you can afford them otherwise some
    >good ordinary gaiters will stop rain from getting in as long as you
    >wear your leggings on the outside (how many times do I see these
    >tucked in?).


    Gaiters should be outside when using crampons (cheaper to replace torn
    gaiters than torn overtrousers) but when raining overtousers over
    gaiters otherwise the water runs down your leg inside the gaiter and
    into the boots.
    --
    Phil Cook looking north over the park to the "Westminster Gasworks"
     
  7. Tom

    Tom Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 20:01:21 +0100, "Dave Moore"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi All,
    > Just returned from a mid-wales backpack over the bank holiday which was
    >pretty good. Had a bit of trouble (as I typically do) with my feet getting
    >sore though. There seems to be a 'hot-spot' in the centre of each foot just
    >below the toes, which after a 2 or 3 days will enevitably develop into a
    >blister (with the associated pain). This doesn't seem to be boot dependant
    >as it occurs whilst wearing either my leather or fabric boots.
    >



    Ah, my feet are still recovering from my own BH excursion round the
    lakes.

    Normally when I'm going up mountains I'm fellrunning, wearing not much
    more than vest and knickers. This time though I was making my first
    stab at walking / wild camping, recce-ing part of the Bob Graham
    Round.

    Two wet 20-mile days standing in bogs and carrying a 25lb pack has led
    to the expected blisters, but also some toes worryingly remaining
    numb.

    This may possibly be due to my wearing Tescos 3-for-a-£ nylon socks
    and lightweight trail running shoes.

    I can feel some shopping coming on....

    Tom
     
  8. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...

    > socks out even overnight whilst wild camping. In fact, if anybody's got any
    > ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be
    > interested. Obviously there's a limit to the number of spare dry socks I can
    > carry/afford!.


    stick them in your bag overnight and let your body heat dry them out

    --
    Darren
     
  9. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, SteveO says...
    > On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 20:01:21 +0100, "Dave Moore"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    > >In fact, if anybody's got any
    > >ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be
    > >interested.

    >
    > oh, that one is so-oo easy ;-)
    >
    > right... assuming you're not going commando, if you are then you're
    > stuffed ;-)
    >
    > thread socks up inside of underpants, one sock 'down' each leg, so to
    > speak, and tuck top of socks into elastic waist of underpants: keeps
    > them there all night, driza bone in the morning :)


    thank god we only have 2 feet :)

    --
    Darren
     
  10. Judith

    Judith Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 23:55:27 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:

    >stick them in your bag overnight and let your body heat dry them out


    I put them between my sleeping bag and my mat (after I've dried them
    as best I can by rolling them in a T-shirt). I don't like having wet
    things inside my sleeping bag.

    I always sleep in dry clothes (if it's cold) but will put yesterday's
    damp clothes back on in the morning and put the dry clothes back in
    their plastic bag. Shivering whilst trying to get to sleep in wet
    clothes is horrible but you soon warm up when walking.

    Judith
     
  11. Darren G

    Darren G Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] says...
    > On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 23:55:27 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >stick them in your bag overnight and let your body heat dry them out

    >
    > I put them between my sleeping bag and my mat (after I've dried them
    > as best I can by rolling them in a T-shirt). I don't like having wet
    > things inside my sleeping bag.
    >
    > I always sleep in dry clothes (if it's cold) but will put yesterday's
    > damp clothes back on in the morning and put the dry clothes back in
    > their plastic bag. Shivering whilst trying to get to sleep in wet
    > clothes is horrible but you soon warm up when walking.
    >



    advantage of a long bag and short legs is I can always find some room
    down the end, which seems to get enough warmth for damp things. Really
    wet things tend to get hung up somewhere and, as you say, dried while
    wearing & walking the following bright warm sunny day. If only ...

    --
    Darren
     
  12. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 23:58:09 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:


    >thank god we only have 2 feet :)


    nah, nah, nah; its linear, if you had threee legs (ergo three feet
    ergo three socks) you'd still expect to havew have threee knicker-legs
    to tuck your socks in to.... mind you, finding boxers with the leg
    oles might be a tad problematical




    SteveO

    NE Climbers & walkers chat forum;
    http://www.thenmc.org.uk/phpBB2/index.php

    NMC website: http://www.thenmc.org.uk
     
  13. SteveO

    SteveO Guest

    On Fri, 3 Sep 2004 00:22:13 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:


    <snip lots of talk about pussy-footing around ;-) >

    >advantage of a long bag and short legs is I can always find some room
    >down the end, which seems to get enough warmth for damp things.


    its an as-needs-must situation; you put your wet anythings anywhere
    you like and *hope* they'll be dry enough to use in the morning,
    without exacerbating problems the next day, to your heart's content.
    *But* there's only one way to be sure ;-) ... its like salt and
    cramp, you find out the hard way what works and then realise what the
    <cough> other folk have been quietly suggesting all along ;-)






    SteveO

    NE Climbers & walkers chat forum;
    http://www.thenmc.org.uk/phpBB2/index.php

    NMC website: http://www.thenmc.org.uk
     
  14. AndyP

    AndyP Guest

    "Dave Moore" <[email protected]> wrote

    > that I no chance to dry
    > socks out even overnight whilst wild camping. In fact, if anybody's got

    any
    > ideas for drying out socks in a tent in the pouring rain, I'd really be
    > interested. Obviously there's a limit to the number of spare dry socks I

    can
    > carry/afford!.


    I've switched back from thick, heavy & expensive Smartwool socks to thin,
    light & cheap trainer liner socks (with trainers but no reason not to wear
    them with boots that I can see). Your feet don't overheat and get so damp
    from sweat in the first place, socks dry quicker if they get wet, weigh less
    and take up less space so you can carry more if you want. Haven't noticed
    any loss in comfort but I never get blisters anyway. Feet do get sore if
    they stay wet too long though. You could try sandals (no socks to worry
    about, good for wading through bogs and laughing at others trying to find a
    dry way around) as discussed here recently or trainers if it's dry to keep
    your feet cooler.
     
  15. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 00:52:57 +0100, SteveO wrote:

    >On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 23:58:09 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>thank god we only have 2 feet :)

    >
    >nah, nah, nah; its linear, if you had threee legs (ergo three feet
    >ergo three socks) you'd still expect to havew have threee knicker-legs
    >to tuck your socks in to.... mind you, finding boxers with the leg
    >oles might be a tad problematical


    Dont you have a good Idiran gear shop locally?

    The idea of sleeping with wet socks is horrible.. Still a big problem
    this year.

    I have a big problem with just battered soles in warm weather on firm
    paths.. Bogs are great, no stinging feet. Alpine paths are torture

    Richard Webb.
     
  16. RJ Webb

    RJ Webb Guest

    On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 00:52:57 +0100, SteveO wrote:

    >On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 23:58:09 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >
    >>thank god we only have 2 feet :)

    >
    >nah, nah, nah; its linear, if you had threee legs (ergo three feet
    >ergo three socks) you'd still expect to havew have threee knicker-legs
    >to tuck your socks in to.... mind you, finding boxers with the leg
    >oles might be a tad problematical


    Dont you have a good Idiran gear shop locally?

    The idea of sleeping with wet socks is horrible.. Still a big problem
    this year.

    I have a big problem with just battered soles in warm weather on firm
    paths.. Bogs are great, no stinging feet. Alpine paths are torture

    Richard Webb.
     
  17. In message <[email protected]>, RJ Webb
    <[email protected]> writes
    >On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 00:52:57 +0100, SteveO wrote:
    >
    >>On Thu, 2 Sep 2004 23:58:09 +0100, Darren G <[email protected]> wrote:
    >>
    >>
    >>>thank god we only have 2 feet :)

    >>
    >>nah, nah, nah; its linear, if you had threee legs (ergo three feet
    >>ergo three socks) you'd still expect to havew have threee knicker-legs
    >>to tuck your socks in to.... mind you, finding boxers with the leg
    >>oles might be a tad problematical

    >
    >Dont you have a good Idiran gear shop locally?
    >
    >The idea of sleeping with wet socks is horrible.. Still a big problem
    >this year.


    Sandals are the answer. I've had no wet socks since May. I haven't worn
    any.
    >
    >I have a big problem with just battered soles in warm weather on firm
    >paths.. Bogs are great, no stinging feet. Alpine paths are torture


    I find well cushioned footwear solves this. Also light, breathable
    footwear so your feet don't get hot, sweaty and soft.
     
  18. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Chris Townsend wrote:

    > Sandals are the answer. I've had no wet socks since May. I haven't worn
    > any.


    > I find well cushioned footwear solves this. Also light, breathable
    > footwear so your feet don't get hot, sweaty and soft.


    And you don't get much more breathable than a pair of sandals, of
    course, plus they tend to be light.

    Note that waterproof linings on boots tend to make matters worse if it's
    dry, as they put your foot in an extra plastic bag that generates more
    sweat than it lets out.

    Another aspect is how stiff the sole is. On the one hand, a very stiff
    sole tends to make life harder over easier ground by not letting your
    foot flex naturally, but by spreading the pressure of very uneven
    (especially hard and uneven) ground they can actually reduce fatigue there.
    A thicker, relatively soft sole unit will tend to be more comfortable
    over anything, but you pay a price for extra weight and less control of
    your feet, with a greater chance to turn an ankle.

    So you won't be surprised to hear you can't win!

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch Medical Physics IT Officer
    Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Univ. of Dundee, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK
    net [email protected] http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  19. spongebob

    spongebob Guest

    "Darren G" <[email protected]> wrote

    >
    > advantage of a long bag and short legs is I can always find some

    room
    > down the end, which seems to get enough warmth for damp things.

    Really
    > wet things tend to get hung up somewhere and, as you say, dried

    while
    > wearing & walking the following bright warm sunny day. If only ...
    >

    I did see a couple on the Pennine Way taking advantage of a sunny
    spell after wet, by stringing a washing line between them which was
    suspended from tent poles sticking out of their sacks........

    Graham
     
  20. On Fri, 03 Sep 2004 16:21:03 GMT, "spongebob" <[email protected]> wrote:

    |
    | "Darren G" <[email protected]> wrote
    |
    | >
    | > advantage of a long bag and short legs is I can always find some
    | room
    | > down the end, which seems to get enough warmth for damp things.
    | Really
    | > wet things tend to get hung up somewhere and, as you say, dried
    | while
    | > wearing & walking the following bright warm sunny day. If only ...
    | >
    | I did see a couple on the Pennine Way taking advantage of a sunny
    | spell after wet, by stringing a washing line between them which was
    | suspended from tent poles sticking out of their sacks........

    I have clean dry socks every day.
    We go to the local launderette, to wash and dry everything after a week.

    Ah! the joys of a caravan ;-)

    --
    Dave F
     
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