What Bicycle Can You Recommend For Every Day's Using?

Discussion in 'The Bike Cafe' started by Neet1930, Jun 19, 2015.

  1. Neet1930

    Neet1930 New Member

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    I live not too far from work and for saving money my friend recommend me buy bicycle, as he did via bestshop-usa.com
    What bicycle can you guys recommend for every day's using?
     
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  2. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    You didn't give us much to go on. Do you ride now are you new to the sport? how much money do you want to spend on a bike? are just using the bike to do errands? ride around the neighborhood? fast riding with friends that cycle? touring? What do you want to use the bike for?

    Tell us more about yourself so we can get closer to the target instead of firing a shotgun blast and hope one of the pellets hits the target.
     
  3. Corzhens

    Corzhens Well-Known Member

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    My only bike is the mountain bike (although it's gone now). I normally use it for biking but sometimes I use it for short errands. A fellow rider advised me to buy a bike with slender tires so I wouldn't have difficulty with the pedals since the mountain bike's wheels are not that slender. But I was not convinced since my other purpose in errands is the exercise that I would get. But for the others who would ask me, I would suggest the bike with slender tire.
     
  4. Froze

    Froze Well-Known Member

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    You didn't tell us your budget so I'm going to assume under $1,000.

    You have two choices, buy new or buy used, if you want nothing but a new bike then there are two good types of bikes to buy that would fit errand type of riding with exercise. The first type is a cross bike and the other is a hybrid bike. Diamondback bike makes a nice cross bike called the Haanjo, and for a hybrid the Trek 7.2 Fx, both of these are just under $500.

    The difference between a cross and a hybrid is the hybrid has flat bars like the mountain bike (mtb) you had and thus you have more of an upright riding position, and a cross bike has a drop bar like you see on road bike and thus more of a aero type or lean over type of riding position, also the gearing on a hybrid leans more toward mountain gears and the cross is in between a mtb and a road. If you decide on a different model of bikes than what I mentioned stay away from bikes with suspension forks, cheap suspensions forks cost more than rigid forks and they don't work well and because they cost more the manufacture cuts corners on other aspects of the bike like lower quality frame and or components.

    Both of those two bikes would have more slender tires vs a mtb but not as slender as a road bike which for your purposes would be better. both bikes can be ridden on dirt trails, that's what they were designed to do along with road use, the wheels are stronger than a road bike as is the frame, they make great urban bikes. The cross bike on the road will be a tad faster due to the more aggressive riding position, but like I said you may not like that kind of positioning. Test ride the two types and decide which type of riding position you prefer
     
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  5. ZXD22

    ZXD22 Member

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    We need to know if you are searching for a mountain bike or a road bike. Also for everyday cycling unless you want a good one search one for around 500$+
     
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  6. Susimi

    Susimi Well-Known Member

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    It would be good to say what sort of budget you have in mind?

    Anyway, I'll always recommend a mountain bike. I absolutely swear by them. Suspension, plenty of gears, nice mixed surface tyres and plenty of room to add upgrades. You cannot go wrong with one.
     
  7. welshdude3

    welshdude3 Member

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    Under 10 miles a hardtail/fork mountain bike w/1.75 or 1.50 street tires. Assuming you ride on roads. It you don't want to upgrade to Schwalbe Marathon Plus tires because of the expense use brown Mr. Tuffy tireliners. Don't bother with a suspension fork. They're heavy and unnecessary for commuting. The tires provide plenty of cushion.

    10 miles+: drop-bar cyclo-cross or straight bar hybrid. A cyclo-cross while resembling a road bike are usually a more stout frame/wheelset as they're made for off-road cycling. 28-35mm tires. Keeps rolling resistance low and plenty of comfort. The more narrow the more speed potential. Desirable for longer distances. Use red Mr. Tuffy tire liners. Depending on terrain limit front cranks to a double. Unless absolutely necessary avoid a triple crankset. Trust me in this. New bike or used depends on your budget and bike savvy.

    No matter what type of bike fits your need the following is basic commuting equipment for either:

    Rack, full coverage fenders, 5w rear blinkie, 150 lumens headlight w/strobe option, trunkbag or small panniers, extra tube, metal tire levers(plastic are useless), multi-tool, patchkit, rain poncho, helmet, goggles, frame pump. Your kit can be added to or subtracted from depending on need.

    My commuting experience is more than 25 years. I practice what I preach. ALL my bikes are set up as commuters or utility bikes. Except my fixed-gear. And even it has a seat post rack/trunkbag. Pretty hardcore. Year-round. Have studded tires for winter. lol Obviously, I live car-free. Mostly, find a bike you like and RIDE it. Everything else is secondary.
     
  8. DancingLady

    DancingLady Member

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    That will depend on a number of factors, how far do you plan to ride on your longest ride? What is your terrain like, all flat, or lots of hills? Do you plan to carry a lot of things while riding, as in running errands, grocery shopping?

    If you have a lot of hills on your commute you might want to consider a mountain bike, or a similarly styled bike because they will make hills easier for you. If you have few hills, you might want an upright bike if you prefer sitting upright. Upright/comfort bikes tend to be a bit heavier so longer commutes or lots of hills would make this bike not a good option. However, if you are commuting on flatter roads for a couple of miles, this is a great bike because they often come with, or you can easily attach baskets for carrying things.

    A great place to get more specific advice is going to be your local bike shop. Those guys or gals know the roads around you and can tell you more about how different bikes handle on the routes you are going to take most often.
     
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