what bike should I choose?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by J-Keeling, Feb 16, 2003.

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  1. J-Keeling

    J-Keeling Guest

    Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent, preferably not too
    expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work every weekend, plus carry some occasional luggage.
    After being fed up by being ripped off and appalled by successions of pseudo- mountain/hybrid bikes
    I have become rather attarcted to a more racing style. My old hybrid had a cast dynamo bracket plus
    some handy holes in the frame for the wiring to go through- do any touring bikes have these, or are
    they just another addition to help pass off the cheap models? Any replies would be gratefully
    received as I have had painful experience of wasting hard-earned cash on rubbish bikes. Cheers for
    your help- Matt
     
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  2. Bob Flemming

    Bob Flemming Guest

    >Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent, preferably not too
    >expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work every weekend, plus carry some occasional
    >luggage. After being fed up by being ripped off and appalled by successions of pseudo-
    >mountain/hybrid bikes I have become rather attarcted to a more racing style. My old hybrid had a
    >cast dynamo bracket plus some handy holes in the frame for the wiring to go through- do any touring
    >bikes have these, or are they just another addition to help pass off the cheap models? Any replies
    >would be gratefully received as I have had painful experience of wasting hard-earned cash on
    >rubbish bikes.

    Depending on how mechanically minded you are, there is always the other option - of going even
    cheaper: getting older road bikes from auctions, dumps, secondhand ads in shop windows/online Loot
    etc There are plenty of bikes out there, but it will require you to 'get your spannes out', as a lot
    of these cycles may require newer components, or bits taken from other bikes, but you these older
    frames can still be perfectly ok for what you want.

    But this approach, although while being very fruitful, can be a bit time consuming and requires you
    to go 'looking' a bit further than the retail shop outlets. Secondhand might be the way to go.

    Anyway, just a thought.

    bob
     
  3. ecce_ecce

    ecce_ecce New Member

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    Just buy a litespeed and be done with it:p
     
  4. Simon Hay

    Simon Hay Guest

    Hi Matt,

    j-keeling wrote:
    > Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16

    Ditto...

    > and looking for a decent, preferably not too expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work
    > every weekend, plus carry some occasional luggage. After being fed up by being ripped off and
    > appalled by successions of pseudo- mountain/hybrid bikes I have become rather attarcted to a more
    > racing style.

    I (fairly) recently bought a Dawes Horizon (www.dawescycles.com) touring bike, which is absolutely
    great - it's "racing style" in having drop handlebars etc. but sensible in having mudguards, plenty
    of gears and racks to carry luggage amongst other things. Sounds to me like a touring bike's what
    you want - I went for the Horizon because a) it's Dawes, and as various contributors here put it,
    you can't go far wrong with a Dawes and b) it's cheap (as these things go... I paid £375). I mainly
    bought it because I want to do serious-ish touring - I have a much older road bike I got for £20 and
    have been steadily upgrading for going to and from school to avoid shiny bike getting nicked/rained
    on - but something like that would probably suit you well. Worth checking for decent second-hand
    ones - they apparently last ages... As Bob has already said, picking up something old and fixing it
    as you go can be a cheap and enjoyable way :)

    Cheers,

    Simon
     
  5. Marc

    Marc Guest

    j-keeling <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent, preferably not too
    > expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work every weekend, plus carry some occasional
    > luggage. After being fed up by being ripped off and appalled by successions of pseudo-
    > mountain/hybrid bikes I have become rather attarcted to a more racing style. My old hybrid had a
    > cast dynamo bracket plus some handy holes in the frame for the wiring to go through- do any
    > touring bikes have these, or are they just another addition to help pass off the cheap models? Any
    > replies would be gratefully received as I have had painful experience of wasting hard-earned cash
    > on rubbish bikes.

    A good rule of thumb is to buy the cheapest bike that you can't afford.
     
  6. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Sun, 16 Feb 2003 21:04:19 -0000, "j-keeling" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent, preferably not
    >too expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work every weekend, plus carry some
    >occasional luggage.

    Smart man. Others have suggested the Dawes Horizon - I can't disagree, I think you can't go far
    wrong with Dawes. The Edinburgh Country (from http://www.edinburghbicycle.com) is also very
    good value
    - or visit your bike shop and pick up a second hand rigid (no suspension) MTB and add a rack and
    some decent road tyres like Schwalbe Marathons and a pair of clipless pedals.

    Define "too expensive," though - I spent over fifteen hundred on my bike, which was cheaper than
    nearly four grand for the one I really wanted :)

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  7. W K

    W K Guest

    "j-keeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]...

    > Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent, preferably not too
    > expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work every weekend, plus carry some occasional
    > luggage. After being fed up by being ripped off and appalled by successions of pseudo-
    > mountain/hybrid bikes

    One alternative is a non-appauling rigid mountain bike and shove on slicks. They don't really make
    these any more - apart from the specialised hardrock.

    It'll be a lot cheaper than a tourer, or you'll be able to get something with newer/better
    components.

    How much were you thinking of spending 100,300, 500 ? If its the first then you're looking at a
    really old tourer, or a reasonable MTB less than 5 years old.
     
  8. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    j-keeling wrote:
    > Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent=
    ,
    > preferably not too expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work ev=
    ery
    > weekend, plus carry some occasional luggage. After being fed up by bein=
    g
    > ripped off and appalled by successions of pseudo- mountain/hybrid bikes=
    I
    > have become rather attarcted to a more racing style.

    A racing style is not the best for luggage, and probably not for=20 commuting. A tourer, OTOH, is
    ideal. But a sensibly specced hybrid,=20 like the Ridgeback Velocity or Dawes Discovery 601 should
    do the job=20 fine as well, and is considerably cheaper. If you're buying new then a=20 good hybrid
    can be had for prices from ca. =A3200, while tourers start at=
    =20
    around =A3450. Second hand is a good route, *if* you can find the right =

    machine.

    > cast dynamo bracket plus some handy holes in the frame for the wiring t=
    o go
    > through- do any touring bikes have these, or are they just another addi=
    tion
    > to help pass off the cheap models?=20

    Most comedy componentry to pass off cheap gaspipe is there to make thing =

    look "sporty". But it shouldn't be any great problem to fit a dynamo to =

    a tourer.

    Pete. --=20 Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics,
    Ninewells Hospital Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  9. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > On Sun, 16 Feb 2003 21:04:19 -0000, "j-keeling" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Hi, this may sound kind of stupid, but I'm 16, and looking for a decent, preferably not too
    > >expensive road/touring bike to use to get to work every weekend, plus carry some occasional
    > >luggage.
    >
    > Smart man. Others have suggested the Dawes Horizon - I can't disagree, I think you can't go far
    > wrong with Dawes. The Edinburgh Country (from http://www.edinburghbicycle.com) is also very
    > good value
    > - or visit your bike shop and pick up a second hand rigid (no suspension) MTB and add a rack
    > and some decent road tyres like Schwalbe Marathons and a pair of clipless pedals.
    >
    > Define "too expensive," though - I spent over fifteen hundred on my bike, which was cheaper than
    > nearly four grand for the one I really wanted :)
    >
    > Guy
    > ===
    > ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    > dynamic DNS permitting)
    > NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    > work. Apologies.

    Guy, in this context I think "too expensive" means "way beyond the means of a 16 yr old lad with a
    saturday job".

    I've got an Horizon - excellent bike for what you say you want it for, but I'd be inclined to buy
    something a bit lighter - one of the Dawes Giro models perhaps. Don't forget that the H. is 30lbs
    weight, albeit geared right down so even unfit smokers like me can winch it up hills.

    However, I've been gradually moving towards the position that the best bike is the one you most want
    to ride. If you can, try a few out and consider the ones which make you grin. As I'm sure many
    people will say don't get too hung up on buying the "correct" bike. Lots of people do long commutes
    through city streets, or even light touring, on 23mm tyres and racing wheels - Good luck, and enjoy
    whatever you buy.

    SteveP
     
  10. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:

    > it shouldn't be any great problem to fit a dynamo to a tourer.

    No indeed - in my experience they almost all have a front hub ;-)

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#103 http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#104
     
  11. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    stephen pridgeon wrote:

    >> Define "too expensive," though - I spent over fifteen hundred on my bike, which was cheaper than
    >> nearly four grand for the one I really wanted :)

    > Guy, in this context I think "too expensive" means "way beyond the means of a 16 yr old lad with a
    > saturday job".

    Note the smiley. We don't know if Pater might chip in, after all. A young lad with a Saturday job as
    their only means of support prolly can't afford the Horizon either - hence my comment about
    second-hand bikes (often surprisingly good value even from bike shops).

    Which is actually why I asked the question, define too expensive. It's really hard to make an
    intelligent recommendation with no idea of budget. £100? £200? £300?

    --
    Guy
    ===
    I wonder if you wouldn't mind piecing out our imperfections with your thoughts; and while you're
    about it perhaps you could think when we talk of bicycles, that you see them printing their proud
    wheels i' the receiving earth; thanks awfully.

    http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#103 http://www.highwaycode.gov.uk/09.shtml#104
     
  12. J-Keeling

    J-Keeling Guest

    Thanks guys- I'm quite tempted by the 'scrapheap challenge' idea as I was thrilled to bits by my old
    'sit up and beg' fixed wheel trade bike which I bought for a tenner down at auction- stuck a new set
    of tyres/tubes on her and filled up the wonderfully quaint little oilers on the front hub and bottom
    bracket- the ultimate load lugger but not the easiest or speediest of things to pedal ;-)

    Matt
     
  13. In news:[email protected], Just zis Guy, you know?
    <[email protected]> typed:

    > Note the smiley. We don't know if Pater might chip in, after all. A young lad with a Saturday job
    > as their only means of support prolly can't afford the Horizon either - hence my comment about
    > second-hand bikes (often surprisingly good value even from bike shops).

    Maybe not a '02 or 03 Horizon; but it looks like that these have been made for some years, and he
    may end up with one alsmost as old as himself (or older!) I guess it may need new parts, but would
    imagine the design is essentially the same and parts are pretty standard...

    Alex
     
  14. "j-keeling" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Thanks guys- I'm quite tempted by the 'scrapheap challenge' idea as I was thrilled to bits by my
    > old 'sit up and beg' fixed wheel trade bike which I bought for a tenner down at auction- stuck a
    > new set of tyres/tubes on her and filled up the wonderfully quaint little oilers on the front
    > hub and bottom bracket- the ultimate load lugger but not the easiest or speediest of things to
    > pedal ;-)
    >
    > Matt

    Ohhh, jealous :)

    does this make me a bike pervert ;((

    SteveP
     
  15. "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>...
    > stephen pridgeon wrote:
    >
    > >> Define "too expensive," though - I spent over fifteen hundred on my bike, which was cheaper
    > >> than nearly four grand for the one I really wanted :)
    >
    > > Guy, in this context I think "too expensive" means "way beyond the means of a 16 yr old lad with
    > > a saturday job".
    >
    > Note the smiley. We don't know if Pater might chip in, after all. A young lad with a Saturday job
    > as their only means of support prolly can't afford the Horizon either - hence my comment about
    > second-hand bikes (often surprisingly good value even from bike shops).
    >
    > Which is actually why I asked the question, define too expensive. It's really hard to make an
    > intelligent recommendation with no idea of budget. £100? £200? £300?
    >
    > --
    > Guy

    Guy,
    a) I missed the smiley - sorry.
    b) I must not post early in the morning. I must not post early in the morning. I must not post
    early... x 100 as penance.
    c) I must keep track of what I post to so as to reply to nice people such as yourself sooner. I must
    keep track.... etc x 100 to remind
    ca.

    Regards SteveP
     
  16. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On 20 Feb 2003 01:53:51 -0800, [email protected] (stephen pridgeon) wrote:

    >Guy,
    >a) I missed the smiley - sorry.

    De nada, dear boy. Think no more of it.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
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