What Bike?

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Tony B, Feb 12, 2004.

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  1. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

    Sorry to be so lame, however here goes:

    I am returning to cycling after 10 years off. I was incredibly fat, now not so but at 90kg still
    er, large.

    I want to cycle backroads, towpaths, a bit of town road and a little unsurfaced stuff. Nothing
    extream, but easy bridalways would be nice. It's only for fun as I walk to work (just less than a
    mile so hardly worth the effort of locking it up at the other end).

    I'd like a low-maintenance bike, with a bit of cred, that will keep me happy.

    Unfortunately for me, I'm vain enough to want something that looks the part with some cool bits on.

    I quite like the look of Kona as a company, but only cos I have swalled their marketing hype :)

    I live on the east side of Manchester, a good local cycle shop seems essential. Any recommendations?

    Also what about cycle clothing, what do I really need eg posh shoes etc? Will my old Bell cycle
    helmet be OK or do they "go off" like motocycle helmets do?

    Again, sorry to be so far out of touch. Last bike I had was a Saracen TuffTrax with gripshift!
    Which was nice.

    tia,

    Tony
     
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  2. On 12/2/04 10:04 pm, in article [email protected], "Tony B"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    > Sorry to be so lame, however here goes:
    >
    > I am returning to cycling after 10 years off. I was incredibly fat, now not so but at 90kg still
    > er, large.

    I am also somewhat large. The good thing is that the bike takes all the weight.

    >
    > I want to cycle backroads, towpaths, a bit of town road and a little unsurfaced stuff. Nothing
    > extream, but easy bridalways would be nice. It's only for fun as I walk to work (just less than a
    > mile so hardly worth the effort of locking it up at the other end).
    >
    MTB/Hybrid should fit the bill. Don't buy cheap crap, It'll be a hate-hate relationship.

    > Also what about cycle clothing, what do I really need eg posh shoes etc? Will my old Bell cycle
    > helmet be OK or do they "go off" like motocycle helmets do?

    Depends how far you are going. Comfy shorts are really good. I like having really stiff shoes as it
    takes a lot of the ache out of the feet.

    Helmets will get a mixed response from the group. If you want to wear one then I would recommend
    ditching the old one, it is probably well outside it's design lifetime. Make sure it is properly
    fitted and try to not use it.

    As you realise, a good local bike shop is a good thing.

    ..d
     
  3. Chris Heys

    Chris Heys Guest

    >I live on the east side of Manchester, a good local cycle shop seems essential. Any
    >recommendations?
    >
    Bicycle Doctor come highly recommended. They're based in Rusholme. Website can be found at

    http://www.bicycledoctor.co.uk

    Cheers, Chris
     
  4. > I live on the east side of Manchester, a good local cycle shop seems essential. Any
    > recommendations?

    www.bicycledoctor.co.uk are good - excellent customer service and a good range of bikes. They live
    just off the Southern end of Rusholme.

    If you've got plenty of cash you could try: http://www.harryhallcycles.co.uk They are under one of
    the railway arches west of Oxford Road Station. They are a bit up themselves though.

    There's also a traditional little bike shop in Withington. They sell all the usual stuff, and make
    their own frames too if you want something that'll fit perfectly. They're at 28 Burton Road.
    Customer service could do with a bit of a polish (like I said, traditional bike shop) but once they
    get to you they're good (you just tend to stand around twiddling your thumbs while they deal with
    another customer - they just pretend you're not there until they're ready to deal with you!). Have
    been pleased with the work they've done tho, and charges for fixing things might be a bit lower that
    the others.
     
  5. Arthur Clune

    Arthur Clune Guest

    Tony B <[email protected]> wrote:

    : I'd like a low-maintenance bike, with a bit of cred, that will keep me happy.

    I know what you mean, but unfortunately it's either-or here.

    Low maintence = hub gears, no suspension Cred = lots of gears and full suspension

    The latter requires a lot more maintence than the former if you want it to last.

    : I quite like the look of Kona as a company, but only cos I have swalled their marketing hype :)

    I like Kona. All their bikes I've ridden have been nice.

    I'd suggest (to go with my split above)

    * a hub geared commuting hybrid. Mudguards etc. Very low maintence and will cope fine with easy
    bridleways etc OR
    * a front suspension MTB. Lots of cred. More work.

    I'd avoid a full suspension bike for what you want. They are more expensive (and the cheap ones are
    crap) and more maintence for no great benift for your purposes.

    For helmets, yes, new one. It'll be a lot more comfortable for starters.

    Arthur

    --
    Arthur Clune http://www.clune.org "Technolibertarians make a philosophy out of a personality defect"
    - Paulina Borsook
     
  6. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    "Chris Heys" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >
    > >I live on the east side of Manchester, a good local cycle shop seems essential. Any
    > >recommendations?
    > >
    > Bicycle Doctor come highly recommended. They're based in Rusholme. Website can be found at
    >
    > http://www.bicycledoctor.co.uk
    >

    I'll second that.

    Very happy with the treatment and advice I got when I bought a bike there, and in subsequent visits.

    Tim.

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
    Version: 6.0.583 / Virus Database: 369 - Release Date: 10/02/04
     
  7. In news:[email protected],
    Arthur Clune <[email protected]> typed:
    > Tony B <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >> I'd like a low-maintenance bike, with a bit of cred, that will keep me happy.
    >
    > I know what you mean, but unfortunately it's either-or here.
    >
    > Low maintence = hub gears, no suspension Cred = lots of gears and full suspension
    >
    There are hub gear bikes with a bit of cred. My Scott Street G2 has a nice sleek black paint finish
    and hub gear, and a general kind of modern shape. Oh, and a Carradice saddlebag to ruin the effect.

    There's one by Ridgeback this year, too: the Switch Nemesis, with an 8 speed hub gear, disc brakes,
    and other stylish stuff. see: http://www.ridgeback.co.uk/bikes/2004/bike.asp?seriesid=24&index=2

    A
     
  8. davebee

    davebee New Member

    Joined:
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    [snip]

    > http://www.bicycledoctor.co.uk
    >

    I'll second that.

    Very happy with the treatment and advice I got when I bought a bike there, and in subsequent visits.

    [/snip]

    and I will quite gladly third it. Very nice people, very good customer service. I use them quite a bit for small parts and advice. They aren't the cheapest though.

    I don't like harryhall cycles.
     
  9. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    Martin Family <[email protected]> writes:

    > On 12/2/04 10:04 pm, in article [email protected], "Tony B"
    > <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > > Also what about cycle clothing, what do I really need eg posh shoes etc? Will my old Bell cycle
    > > helmet be OK or do they "go off" like motocycle helmets do?
    >
    > Depends how far you are going. Comfy shorts are really good. I like having really stiff shoes as
    > it takes a lot of the ache out of the feet.

    Oh I do endorse this. For years and years I thought cycling shorts were for poseurs, and
    consequently used to wear through the inner thighs of my jeans at a positively fearsome rate. Now I
    can't bear cycling in jeans - they're so stiff and uncomfortable, and the seams dig in in all the
    wrong places. If you don't go in at the waist, wear bib-shorts or bib-tights - very comfortable and
    practical - and if you hear a peep out of wafflycat, taunt her about her bra.

    > Helmets will get a mixed response from the group. If you want to wear one then I would recommend
    > ditching the old one, it is probably well outside it's design lifetime. Make sure it is properly
    > fitted and try to not use it.

    They're supposed to have a lifetime of about four years, so you should ditch your old one. However
    it is worth reading the research on helmets yourself first - it's not, actually unambiguously clear
    whether they do much good and opinions are sharply polarised.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/ ;; Sending your money to
    someone just because they've erected ;; a barrier of obscurity and secrets around the tools you ;;
    need to use your data does not help the economy or spur ;; innovation. - Waffle Iron Slashdot, June
    16th, 2002
     
  10. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    "Arthur Clune" <[email protected]> writes:

    > Tony B <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > : I'd like a low-maintenance bike, with a bit of cred, that will keep me happy.
    >
    > I know what you mean, but unfortunately it's either-or here.
    >
    > Low maintence = hub gears, no suspension Cred = lots of gears and full suspension

    Rohloffs have lots of cred, and there's a current Cannondale hybrid with front suspension and
    a Rohloff:

    <URL:http://www.cannondale.com/bikes/04/ce/model-4SS5K.html>

    *Very* nice.

    Or you could get a Nicolai - any of their frames can be specified with Rohloff dropouts:

    <URL:http://www.nicolai.net/>

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/ ;; Sending your money to
    someone just because they've erected ;; a barrier of obscurity and secrets around the tools you ;;
    need to use your data does not help the economy or spur ;; innovation. - Waffle Iron Slashdot, June
    16th, 2002
     
  11. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 12:35:07 GMT someone who may be Simon Brooke
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >and if you hear a peep out of wafflycat, taunt her about her bra.

    >They're supposed to have a lifetime of about four years, so you should ditch your old one.

    However, an old helmet will avoid a lot of nonsense from the helmet lobby, even if it is even more
    useless than a new helmet.

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
    keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  12. Tim Cain

    Tim Cain Guest

    "davebee" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    [snip]
    >
    > I don't like harryhall cycles.
    >

    I don't like Harry Hall cycles either.

    After the straw that broke the camel's back, I wrote a letter to the manager explaining exactly why
    I'd never set foot in the place again: It was probably intercepted and binned by a minion before the
    Mgr. got a chance to read it and have a good belly-laugh.

    It's still on me HD somewhere, but it's probably a bit big to post here.

    Cheers,

    Tim.

    ---
    Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free. Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
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  13. Simon Brooke

    Simon Brooke Guest

    David Hansen <[email protected]> writes:

    > On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 12:35:07 GMT someone who may be Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote this:-
    >
    > >and if you hear a peep out of wafflycat, taunt her about her bra.
    >

    A certain person posting to this group takes grave offence at people wearing straps over their
    shoulders to suspend garments which would otherwise fall down. She even threatens physical
    violence to people who wear such garments. But she doesn't like it pointed out that she wears such
    a garment herself.

    --
    [email protected] (Simon Brooke) http://www.jasmine.org.uk/~simon/

    ;; If you're doing this for fun, do what seems fun. If you're ;; doing it for money, stop
    now. ;; Rainer Deyke
     
  14. Tony B

    Tony B Guest

  15. Steph Peters

    Steph Peters Guest

    "Mark Thompson" <[email protected] (change warm for hot)> of
    wrote:
    >There's also a traditional little bike shop in Withington. They sell all the usual stuff, and make
    >their own frames too if you want something that'll fit perfectly. They're at 28 Burton Road.
    >Customer service could do with a bit of a polish (like I said, traditional bike shop) but once they
    >get to you they're good (you just tend to stand around twiddling your thumbs while they deal with
    >another customer - they just pretend you're not there until they're ready to deal with you!). Have
    >been pleased with the work they've done tho, and charges for fixing things might be a bit lower
    >that the others.

    Withington Cycles changed hands recently and is now run by Malc Cowle who also makes frames (of
    which I have one, and very good it is too) . Very handy for maintenance and repair jobs, especially
    of the can you find a ... to fit here type. Traditional bike shop also in the sense of having lots
    of the bits and pieces wanted for non-MTBs. I thought my bike needed a new headset, but they
    correctly diagnosed it as loose and tightened it for me instead, for a trivial amount of money
    rather than just selling me a headset anyway.
    --
    Boundary, n. In political geography, an imaginary line between two nations,
    separating the imaginary rights of one from the imaginary rights of another.
    Ambrose Bierce
    Steph Peters delete invalid from [email protected]
    Tatting, lace & stitching page <http://www.sandbenders.demon.co.uk/index.htm
     
  16. David Hansen

    David Hansen Guest

    On Fri, 13 Feb 2004 17:35:02 GMT someone who may be Simon Brooke
    <[email protected]> wrote this:-

    >A certain person posting to this group takes grave offence at people wearing straps over their
    >shoulders to suspend garments which would otherwise fall down. She even threatens physical
    >violence to people who wear such garments. But she doesn't like it pointed out that she wears such
    >a garment herself.

    I'm not a great fan of bras, but I thought that the aim of them is not to stop the garment itself
    falling down. Rather the aim is to do things with parts of the body. Perhaps I am just confused:)

    --
    David Hansen, Edinburgh | PGP email preferred-key number F566DA0E I will always explain revoked
    keys, unless the UK government prevents me using the RIP Act 2000.
     
  17. Simon Brooke <[email protected]> wrote in message
    > Or you could get a Nicolai - any of their frames can be specified with Rohloff dropouts:

    In fact our bikes have a Rohloff dropout as standard (apart from the Hardtail on which it's an
    option). Cable guides can be supplied for Rohloff, conventional or both.
     
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