What can one do to reduce LDL's

Discussion in 'Health and medical' started by Michael P Gabriel, Dec 6, 2003.

  1. Hi, My lipid profile is not too bad...C=204 and CH / HDL ratio =
    3.4. All others within range except LDL's-129. Also, I want to
    concentrate on LDL. Would natural seed pastes such as sesame paste
    made from sesame seeds and known as Tahini, be responsible? I use one
    teaspoon per day and that would be 2/3 of a gram of satfat! But
    natural satfat! Not even processing involved.

    Thanks! I'm convinced that most doctors are really not into nutrition
    and instinctively reach for tht dreaded prescription pad..

    Mike
    [email protected]
    Help please?
     
    Tags:


  2. Michael P Gabriel wrote:

    > Hi, My lipid profile is not too bad...C=204 and CH / HDL ratio =
    > 3.4. All others within range except LDL's-129. Also, I want to
    > concentrate on LDL. Would natural seed pastes such as sesame paste
    > made from sesame seeds and known as Tahini, be responsible?


    Could be.

    > I use one
    > teaspoon per day and that would be 2/3 of a gram of satfat! But
    > natural satfat! Not even processing involved.


    Doesn't matter. Saturated is saturated.

    >
    >
    > Thanks! I'm convinced that most doctors are really not into nutrition
    > and instinctively reach for tht dreaded prescription pad..
    >


    What about the rest of your medical history? Are you overweight? Do you
    have hypertension, diabetes, coronary disease, et cetera?

    >
    > Mike
    > [email protected]
    > Help please?


    Certainly.

    Humbly,

    Andrew

    --
    Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD
    Board-Certified Cardiologist
    http://www.heartmdphd.com/
     
  3. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    6 Dec 2003 04:39:54 -0800 in article
    <[email protected]> [email protected] (Michael
    P Gabriel) wrote:

    >Hi, My lipid profile is not too bad...C=204 and CH / HDL ratio =
    >3.4. All others within range except LDL's-129. Also, I want to
    >concentrate on LDL. Would natural seed pastes such as sesame paste
    >made from sesame seeds and known as Tahini, be responsible? I use one
    >teaspoon per day and that would be 2/3 of a gram of satfat! But
    >natural satfat! Not even processing involved.
    >

    Actually you get less than 2/3 of gram of saturated fatty acids from a
    teaspoonful of tahini, about 0.34 g. That's negligible, IMHO, especially
    considering that you also get 0.91 g monounsaturated and 1.06 g
    polyunsaturated fatty acids from the same teaspoonful of tahini. These
    figures are based on

    Search the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference
    <http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgi-bin/nut_search.pl>

    Note that you also get 0.9 g, 0.6 g and 0.65 g saturated fatty acids from
    a teaspoonful of fish oil, olive oil and soy oil, respectively, each of
    which is more than you get from a teaspoonful of tahini.

    There are tiny amounts of saturated fatty acids in practically all oils
    and fats. You cannot avoid getting some saturated fatty acids, if you're
    going to eat fat. And you are, because fat free diet is besides unhealthy,
    also impossible to implement in practice.

    What you can avoid is to eat foods whose fat content consists
    _predominantly_ of saturated fatty acids, such as meats and animal fat,
    (excluding fat from fish, marine mammals and other seafood).
     
  4. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Sat, 06 Dec 2003 16:09:59 -0500 in article
    <[email protected]> "Dr. Andrew B. Chung, MD/PhD"
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Michael P Gabriel wrote:
    >
    >> Hi, My lipid profile is not too bad...C=204 and CH / HDL ratio =
    >> 3.4. All others within range except LDL's-129. Also, I want to
    >> concentrate on LDL. Would natural seed pastes such as sesame paste
    >> made from sesame seeds and known as Tahini, be responsible?

    >
    >Could be.
    >
    >> I use one
    >> teaspoon per day and that would be 2/3 of a gram of satfat! But
    >> natural satfat! Not even processing involved.

    >
    >Doesn't matter. Saturated is saturated.
    >

    One cannot eliminate saturated fatty acids from the diet. Teaspoon of
    tahini contains only about 0.34 g of them (not 2/3 of a gram), which is
    far less than in a teaspoon of fish, olive or soy oil, just to mention a
    few. It also contains considerably larger amount of monounsaturated and
    polyunsaturated fatty acids.
     
  5. Hi,

    With your ratio at 3.4 you're in good shape. It's as important to
    increase HDL as it is to reduce LDL. Try oatmeal - one cup daily may
    reduce LDL by 10%. Also, avoid saturated fat - stick unsaturated -
    olive oil, for example. To reduce CHD risk be sure to eat 2x fatty
    fish (salmon, etc) weekly. No, sesame seeds wouldn't increase LDL.
    Eating a higher % of fats in your diet can improve your lipid profile
    if they are "good" fats. See
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/fats.html

    [email protected] (Michael P Gabriel) wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...
    > Hi, My lipid profile is not too bad...C=204 and CH / HDL ratio =
    > 3.4. All others within range except LDL's-129. Also, I want to
    > concentrate on LDL. Would natural seed pastes such as sesame paste
    > made from sesame seeds and known as Tahini, be responsible? I use one
    > teaspoon per day and that would be 2/3 of a gram of satfat! But
    > natural satfat! Not even processing involved.
    >
    > Thanks! I'm convinced that most doctors are really not into nutrition
    > and instinctively reach for tht dreaded prescription pad..
    >
    > Mike
    > [email protected]
    > Help please?
     
  6. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Sun, 07 Dec 2003 00:16:24 +0200 in article
    <[email protected]> Matti Narkia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >6 Dec 2003 04:39:54 -0800 in article
    ><[email protected]> [email protected] (Michael
    >P Gabriel) wrote:
    >
    >>Hi, My lipid profile is not too bad...C=204 and CH / HDL ratio =
    >>3.4. All others within range except LDL's-129. Also, I want to
    >>concentrate on LDL. Would natural seed pastes such as sesame paste
    >>made from sesame seeds and known as Tahini, be responsible? I use one
    >>teaspoon per day and that would be 2/3 of a gram of satfat! But
    >>natural satfat! Not even processing involved.
    >>

    >Actually you get less than 2/3 of gram of saturated fatty acids from a
    >teaspoonful of tahini, about 0.34 g. That's negligible, IMHO, especially
    >considering that you also get 0.91 g monounsaturated and 1.06 g
    >polyunsaturated fatty acids from the same teaspoonful of tahini. These
    >figures are based on
    >
    > Search the USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference
    > <http://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/cgi-bin/nut_search.pl>
    >

    So the amount of saturated fatty acids in tahini gives no reason for
    concern. However, it has a rather high amount of omega-6 polyunsaturated
    fatty acids, which we tend to get too much in comparison with omega-3
    fatty acids. One teaspoonful of tahini a day will not harm you and will
    probably be good for you, but if you start consuming larger amounts of
    tahini, say several tablespoons a day or more, you may be getting too much
    omega-6 fatty acids.

    Omega-3 fatty acids are very important for the general health and for the
    prevention of fatal cardiac incidents. Best sources are fatty fish and
    fish oil, which contain omega-3 fatty acids EPA and DHA. Best plant
    sources are ground flaxseed and flaxseed oil, but they contain
    alpha-linolenic acid, which body has to convert to EPA and DHA, and this
    conversion is slow and inefficient.
     
  7. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    7 Dec 2003 12:53:52 -0800 in article
    <[email protected]> [email protected]
    (Michael P Gabriel) wrote:

    >.....to all the beautiful people who answered succinctly and so
    >clearly my question about lowering LDL's and using Tahini! My folks
    >were from Greece and I was weaned from mother's milk on Tahini, I'm
    >positive! I am thrilled with the answers, and ready to start 2004 on
    >the right note...to better halth, as naturally as I can. May your 2004
    >be happy, healthy and holy!!!
    >

    Mike, if your roots are in Greece, find out (if you don't already know)
    about traditional Greek diets, especially about the diet of Crete. The
    Mediterranean diet is very heart-friendly and the traditional Cretan diet
    is the best of all the variations of Mediterranean diet. In the famous
    _Seven Countries Study_ Crete had the lowest incidence of coronary heart
    disease of all the countries included. Cancer incidence was quite low,
    too. A lot of past and current nutritional research has been inspired by
    the _Seven Countries Study_ and the diet of Crete. So go back to your
    roots diet wise and stay healthy :).
     
  8. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Sun, 07 Dec 2003 23:34:19 +0200 in article
    <[email protected]> Matti Narkia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >7 Dec 2003 12:53:52 -0800 in article
    ><[email protected]> [email protected]
    >(Michael P Gabriel) wrote:
    >
    >>.....to all the beautiful people who answered succinctly and so
    >>clearly my question about lowering LDL's and using Tahini! My folks
    >>were from Greece and I was weaned from mother's milk on Tahini, I'm
    >>positive! I am thrilled with the answers, and ready to start 2004 on
    >>the right note...to better halth, as naturally as I can. May your 2004
    >>be happy, healthy and holy!!!
    >>

    >Mike, if your roots are in Greece, find out (if you don't already know)
    >about traditional Greek diets, especially about the diet of Crete. The
    >Mediterranean diet is very heart-friendly and the traditional Cretan diet
    >is the best of all the variations of Mediterranean diet. In the famous
    >_Seven Countries Study_ Crete had the lowest incidence of coronary heart
    >disease of all the countries included. Cancer incidence was quite low,
    >too. A lot of past and current nutritional research has been inspired by
    >the _Seven Countries Study_ and the diet of Crete. So go back to your
    >roots diet wise and stay healthy :).


    A note about the traditional Cretan diet and fat: It derived about 40% of
    its calories from fat, mostly from olive oil. Omega-3 fatty acids were
    also well presented, but intake of saturated fatty acids was fairly low.
     
  9. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

  10. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Mon, 08 Dec 2003 15:42:01 +0200 in article
    <[email protected]> Matti Narkia
    <[email protected]> wrote:

    >I have considerably expanded and rearranged my bibliography of
    >Mediterranean diet. It now includes 151 references. There are now also
    >several studies about health effects of nuts. Enjoy.
    >

    It seems that I've missed an important recent study, here's the 152nd
    reference:

    Singh RB, Dubnov G, Niaz MA, Ghosh S, Singh R, Rastogi SS, Manor O, Pella
    D, Berry EM.
    Effect of an Indo-Mediterranean diet on progression of coronary artery
    disease in high risk patients (Indo-Mediterranean Diet Heart Study): a
    randomised single-blind trial.
    Lancet. 2002 Nov 9;360(9344):1455-61
    <http://www.thelancet.com/journal/vol360/iss9344/full/llan.360.9344.original_research.23027.1>
     
  11. On Mon, 08 Dec 2003 20:48:53 +0200, Matti Narkia <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Mon, 08 Dec 2003 11:36:35 -0600 in article
    > <[email protected]> "Patrick Blanchard, M.D."
    > <[email protected]_nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    >> Archived by "Fetch"
    >>
    >> http://tinyurl.com/y9gd
    >>

    > That was quick. It would 've been polite if "Fetch" had mentioned the
    > source.
    >
    >
    >


    Sorry, "Fetch" is run by members of sonscore.com and scans usenet for
    material that would be useful to others wanting to address atherosclerosis.
    Many of our clients do not have usenet accounts, or do not understand what
    it is, even though it is free on Google. "Fetch" sorts out the good stuff
    and archives it all in one place, on our site.

    Do you have a preference on the source "Fetch" should put? Let me know, and
    I will update it.

    Thanks Matti
    Patrick

    --
    ~~~
    Patrick Blanchard, M.D., A.B.F.P.
    Board Certified in Family Practice
    http://www.familydoctor.org/blanchard
    ~~~
    SonoScore
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  12. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

  13. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Mon, 08 Dec 2003 13:59:10 -0600 in article
    <[email protected]> "Patrick Blanchard, M.D."
    <[email protected]_nospam.com> wrote:

    >On Mon, 08 Dec 2003 20:48:53 +0200, Matti Narkia <[email protected]>
    >wrote:
    >
    >> Mon, 08 Dec 2003 11:36:35 -0600 in article
    >> <[email protected]> "Patrick Blanchard, M.D."
    >> <[email protected]_nospam.com> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Archived by "Fetch"
    >>>
    >>> http://tinyurl.com/y9gd
    >>>

    >> That was quick. It would 've been polite if "Fetch" had mentioned the
    >> source.

    >
    >Sorry, "Fetch" is run by members of sonscore.com and scans usenet for
    >material that would be useful to others wanting to address atherosclerosis.
    >Many of our clients do not have usenet accounts, or do not understand what
    >it is, even though it is free on Google. "Fetch" sorts out the good stuff
    >and archives it all in one place, on our site.
    >
    >Do you have a preference on the source "Fetch" should put? Let me know, and
    >I will update it.
    >

    That's ok. I thought that "Fetch" was a person. Anyway, it could possibly
    be useful to add a feature to "Fetch", which would allow it to get also
    the newsgroups's name and the author's and the message's details, so that
    the whole thread could be tracked down, if someone so desires. Or maybe it
    already can do that?
     
  14. On Tue, 09 Dec 2003 00:18:35 +0200, Matti Narkia <[email protected]>
    wrote:

    > Mon, 08 Dec 2003 13:59:10 -0600 in article
    > <[email protected]> "Patrick Blanchard, M.D."
    > <[email protected]_nospam.com> wrote:
    >
    >> On Mon, 08 Dec 2003 20:48:53 +0200, Matti Narkia <[email protected]>
    >> wrote:
    >>
    >>> Mon, 08 Dec 2003 11:36:35 -0600 in article
    >>> <[email protected]> "Patrick Blanchard, M.D."
    >>> <[email protected]_nospam.com> wrote:
    >>>
    >>>> Archived by "Fetch"
    >>>>
    >>>> http://tinyurl.com/y9gd
    >>>>
    >>> That was quick. It would 've been polite if "Fetch" had mentioned the
    >>> source.

    >>
    >> Sorry, "Fetch" is run by members of sonscore.com and scans usenet for
    >> material that would be useful to others wanting to address
    >> atherosclerosis. Many of our clients do not have usenet accounts, or do
    >> not understand what it is, even though it is free on Google. "Fetch"
    >> sorts out the good stuff and archives it all in one place, on our site.
    >>
    >> Do you have a preference on the source "Fetch" should put? Let me know,
    >> and I will update it.
    >>

    > That's ok. I thought that "Fetch" was a person. Anyway, it could possibly
    > be useful to add a feature to "Fetch", which would allow it to get also
    > the newsgroups's name and the author's and the message's details, so that
    > the whole thread could be tracked down, if someone so desires. Or maybe
    > it
    > already can do that?
    >
    >
    >
    >


    We use Opera, and essentially cut and paste from tne newsgroup for "Fetch".
    Would another newsreader work better, to include more message details like
    you are describing?

    Thanks
    Patrick

    --
    ~~~
    Patrick Blanchard, M.D., A.B.F.P.
    Board Certified in Family Practice
    http://www.familydoctor.org/blanchard
    ~~~
    SonoScore
    Winning against heart attack and stroke
    http://www.sonoscore.com
     
  15. Matti Narkia

    Matti Narkia Guest

    Harvard School of Public Health Nutrition Source's page

    Food Pyramids
    http://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/pyramids.html

    favorable asses Mediterranean food pyramid:

    "Other Alternatives

    The Healthy Eating Pyramid summarizes the best dietary
    information available today. It isn't set in stone,
    though, because nutrition researchers will undoubtedly
    turn up new information in the years ahead. The Healthy
    Eating Pyramid will change to reflect important new
    evidence.

    This isn't the only alternative to the USDA's Food Guide
    Pyramid. The Asian, Latin, Mediterranean, and vegetarian
    pyramids promoted by Oldways Preservation and Exchange
    Trust[www.oldwayspt.org] are also good, evidence-based
    guides for healthy eating. The Healthy Eating Pyramid
    takes advantage of even more extensive research and offers
    a broader guide that is not based on a specific
    culture.The Healthy Eating Pyramid is described in greater
    detail in Eat, Drink, and Be Healthy: The Harvard Medical
    School Guide to Healthy Eating, published by Simon and
    Schuster (2001)."


    The description of Mediterranean Diet Food Pyramid can be found on the we
    pages

    The Mediterranean Diet Pyramid
    <http://www.oldwayspt.org/pyramids/med/p_med.html>

    and

    Mediterranean Diet Food Pyramid
    <http://www.diet-i.com/mediterranean-diet-pyramid.htm>

    See also

    Healthy Eating Pyramids & Other Tools
    <http://www.e-guana.net/organizations.php3?orgid=61&typeID=193&action=printContentItem&itemID=1521>

    --
    Matti Narkia
     
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