What causes a stictch ?

Discussion in 'General Fitness' started by rundmb, Feb 24, 2006.

  1. rundmb

    rundmb Guest

    Last couple of weeks i seam to be getting a "stitch" in my left lower side
    after 20 minutes or so sunning, what exactly causes this and how can i
    prevent it?

    thanks
     
    Tags:


  2. Mike

    Mike Guest

    This is the best explaination I have seen, from ww.drmirkin.com:

    It took years for the medical community to finally learn what causes a
    side stitch. Suddenly a runner develops pain in the right upper part of
    the belly, just underneath the ribs in the front. With each step the
    pain worsens. Doctors proposed all sorts of explanations for side
    stitch and most were nonsense. A stitch is not caused by gas in the
    colon because it is not relived by passing gas. It is not caused by a
    liver swollen with blood during running, because the liver has a very
    distensible capsule and the liver does not enlarge that much during
    exercise. It is not caused by cramps in the belly muscles because the
    belly muscles are not held rigidly when you have a side stitch, and it
    does not hurt when you push on the belly muscles. Lack of oxygen to the
    diaphragm doesn't cause them because blood flow to the diaphragm is not
    shut off by running. They are not caused by trapped gas in the lungs
    because gas does not get trapped in the lungs during exercise.

    Then along came Dr. Tim Noakes, a medical school professor from South
    Africa, who offered the first reasonable explanation and a successful
    treatment. Thick fibrous bands called ligaments extend downward from
    your diaphragm to hold your liver in place. When you run, your liver
    drops at the exact time that your diaphragm goes up, stretching the
    ligaments and causing pain. Humans have a fixed pattern of breathing
    when they run. They have a two to one breathing ratio, breathing once
    for each two strides. Most people breathe out when the right foot
    strikes the ground. When you breathe out, your diaphragm goes up, and
    at the same time, the force of your foot strike causes your liver to go
    down. This stretches the ligaments that attach the liver to your
    diaphragm, causing pain. So the cause of a side stitch during hard
    running is a stretching of the ligaments that hold the liver to the
    diaphragm and the cure is to relieve the stretching of the ligaments.

    When you get a stitch, stop running and press your hand deep into your
    liver to raise it up against your diaphragm. At the same time, purse
    your lips and blow out against the tightly held lips as hard as you
    can. Pushing the liver up stops stretching the ligaments. Breathing out
    hard empties your lungs. The pain is relieved immediately and you can
    resume running as soon as the pain disappears. The pain usually will
    not go away unless you stop running long enough to raise your liver.
     
  3. rundmb

    rundmb Guest

    "Mike" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > This is the best explaination I have seen, from ww.drmirkin.com:
    >
    > It took years for the medical community to finally learn what causes a
    > side stitch. Suddenly a runner develops pain in the right upper part of
    > the belly, just underneath the ribs in the front. With each step the
    > pain worsens. Doctors proposed all sorts of explanations for side
    > stitch and most were nonsense. A stitch is not caused by gas in the
    > colon because it is not relived by passing gas. It is not caused by a
    > liver swollen with blood during running, because the liver has a very
    > distensible capsule and the liver does not enlarge that much during
    > exercise. It is not caused by cramps in the belly muscles because the
    > belly muscles are not held rigidly when you have a side stitch, and it
    > does not hurt when you push on the belly muscles. Lack of oxygen to the
    > diaphragm doesn't cause them because blood flow to the diaphragm is not
    > shut off by running. They are not caused by trapped gas in the lungs
    > because gas does not get trapped in the lungs during exercise.
    >
    > Then along came Dr. Tim Noakes, a medical school professor from South
    > Africa, who offered the first reasonable explanation and a successful
    > treatment. Thick fibrous bands called ligaments extend downward from
    > your diaphragm to hold your liver in place. When you run, your liver
    > drops at the exact time that your diaphragm goes up, stretching the
    > ligaments and causing pain. Humans have a fixed pattern of breathing
    > when they run. They have a two to one breathing ratio, breathing once
    > for each two strides. Most people breathe out when the right foot
    > strikes the ground. When you breathe out, your diaphragm goes up, and
    > at the same time, the force of your foot strike causes your liver to go
    > down. This stretches the ligaments that attach the liver to your
    > diaphragm, causing pain. So the cause of a side stitch during hard
    > running is a stretching of the ligaments that hold the liver to the
    > diaphragm and the cure is to relieve the stretching of the ligaments.
    >
    > When you get a stitch, stop running and press your hand deep into your
    > liver to raise it up against your diaphragm. At the same time, purse
    > your lips and blow out against the tightly held lips as hard as you
    > can. Pushing the liver up stops stretching the ligaments. Breathing out
    > hard empties your lungs. The pain is relieved immediately and you can
    > resume running as soon as the pain disappears. The pain usually will
    > not go away unless you stop running long enough to raise your liver.
    >


    cool, thanks for the info, ill give it a go!
     
  4. That's a neat article.
    I never knew the cause; used to think it was just a cramp or something.

    Thanks,
    jobs

    Mike <[email protected]> wrote:
    > This is the best explaination I have seen, from ww.drmirkin.com:
    >
    > It took years for the medical community to finally learn what causes a
    > side stitch.


    ......
     
  5. On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 21:13:23 GMT, "rundmb" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Last couple of weeks i seam to be getting a "stitch" in my left lower side
    >after 20 minutes or so sunning, what exactly causes this and how can i
    >prevent it?
    >
    >thanks
    >


    "Seam"??? Work on your spelling dumbass, then we'll consider a reply.
     
  6. Mike C

    Mike C Guest

    Ahhh, the spelling flame. Sweet, no one has ever thought of that one!
    Great work, newbie.

    Mike C

    [email protected] wrote:
    > On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 21:13:23 GMT, "rundmb" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    > >Last couple of weeks i seam to be getting a "stitch" in my left lower side
    > >after 20 minutes or so sunning, what exactly causes this and how can i
    > >prevent it?
    > >
    > >thanks
    > >

    >
    > "Seam"??? Work on your spelling dumbass, then we'll consider a reply.
     
  7. On 24 Feb 2006 16:07:05 -0800, "Mike C" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >Ahhh, the spelling flame. Sweet, no one has ever thought of that one!
    >Great work, newbie.
    >
    >Mike C


    Loser has one "o", got that? Loser?
     
  8. rundmb

    rundmb Guest

    <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]
    > On Fri, 24 Feb 2006 21:13:23 GMT, "rundmb" <[email protected]> wrote:
    >
    >>Last couple of weeks i seam to be getting a "stitch" in my left lower side
    >>after 20 minutes or so sunning, what exactly causes this and how can i
    >>prevent it?
    >>
    >>thanks
    >>

    >
    > "Seam"??? Work on your spelling dumbass, then we'll consider a reply.



    wanker! your punctuations as bad with your ???
     
  9. Beach Runner

    Beach Runner Guest

    Mike wrote:

    > This is the best explaination I have seen, from ww.drmirkin.com:
    >
    > It took years for the medical community to finally learn what causes a
    > side stitch. Suddenly a runner develops pain in the right upper part of
    > the belly, just underneath the ribs in the front. With each step the
    > pain worsens. Doctors proposed all sorts of explanations for side
    > stitch and most were nonsense. A stitch is not caused by gas in the
    > colon because it is not relived by passing gas. It is not caused by a
    > liver swollen with blood during running, because the liver has a very
    > distensible capsule and the liver does not enlarge that much during
    > exercise. It is not caused by cramps in the belly muscles because the
    > belly muscles are not held rigidly when you have a side stitch, and it
    > does not hurt when you push on the belly muscles. Lack of oxygen to the
    > diaphragm doesn't cause them because blood flow to the diaphragm is not
    > shut off by running. They are not caused by trapped gas in the lungs
    > because gas does not get trapped in the lungs during exercise.
    >
    > Then along came Dr. Tim Noakes, a medical school professor from South
    > Africa, who offered the first reasonable explanation and a successful
    > treatment. Thick fibrous bands called ligaments extend downward from
    > your diaphragm to hold your liver in place. When you run, your liver
    > drops at the exact time that your diaphragm goes up, stretching the
    > ligaments and causing pain. Humans have a fixed pattern of breathing
    > when they run. They have a two to one breathing ratio, breathing once
    > for each two strides. Most people breathe out when the right foot
    > strikes the ground. When you breathe out, your diaphragm goes up, and
    > at the same time, the force of your foot strike causes your liver to go
    > down. This stretches the ligaments that attach the liver to your
    > diaphragm, causing pain. So the cause of a side stitch during hard
    > running is a stretching of the ligaments that hold the liver to the
    > diaphragm and the cure is to relieve the stretching of the ligaments.
    >
    > When you get a stitch, stop running and press your hand deep into your
    > liver to raise it up against your diaphragm. At the same time, purse
    > your lips and blow out against the tightly held lips as hard as you
    > can. Pushing the liver up stops stretching the ligaments. Breathing out
    > hard empties your lungs. The pain is relieved immediately and you can
    > resume running as soon as the pain disappears. The pain usually will
    > not go away unless you stop running long enough to raise your liver.
    >


    That's real interesting. For years I've repeated wrong information.
     
  10. On Sat, 25 Feb 2006 10:56:45 GMT, "rundmb" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >wanker! your punctuations as bad with your ???


    Huh???
     
  11. Thanks for posting this stitch information! I also had the wrong idea
    (thought it was diaphragm cramping up). Who would of guessed we need
    to cram our livers back up???

    Teresa in AZ

    > Mike wrote:
    >
    >> This is the best explaination I have seen, from ww.drmirkin.com:
    >>
    >> It took years for the medical community to finally learn what causes a
    >> side stitch. Suddenly a runner develops pain in the right upper part of
    >> the belly, just underneath the ribs in the front. With each step the
    >> pain worsens. Doctors proposed all sorts of explanations for side
    >> stitch and most were nonsense. A stitch is not caused by gas in the
    >> colon because it is not relived by passing gas. It is not caused by a
    >> liver swollen with blood during running, because the liver has a very
    >> distensible capsule and the liver does not enlarge that much during
    >> exercise. It is not caused by cramps in the belly muscles because the
    >> belly muscles are not held rigidly when you have a side stitch, and it
    >> does not hurt when you push on the belly muscles. Lack of oxygen to the
    >> diaphragm doesn't cause them because blood flow to the diaphragm is not
    >> shut off by running. They are not caused by trapped gas in the lungs
    >> because gas does not get trapped in the lungs during exercise.
    >>
    >> Then along came Dr. Tim Noakes, a medical school professor from South
    >> Africa, who offered the first reasonable explanation and a successful
    >> treatment. Thick fibrous bands called ligaments extend downward from
    >> your diaphragm to hold your liver in place. When you run, your liver
    >> drops at the exact time that your diaphragm goes up, stretching the
    >> ligaments and causing pain. Humans have a fixed pattern of breathing
    >> when they run. They have a two to one breathing ratio, breathing once
    >> for each two strides. Most people breathe out when the right foot
    >> strikes the ground. When you breathe out, your diaphragm goes up, and
    >> at the same time, the force of your foot strike causes your liver to go
    >> down. This stretches the ligaments that attach the liver to your
    >> diaphragm, causing pain. So the cause of a side stitch during hard
    >> running is a stretching of the ligaments that hold the liver to the
    >> diaphragm and the cure is to relieve the stretching of the ligaments.
    >>
    >> When you get a stitch, stop running and press your hand deep into your
    >> liver to raise it up against your diaphragm. At the same time, purse
    >> your lips and blow out against the tightly held lips as hard as you
    >> can. Pushing the liver up stops stretching the ligaments. Breathing out
    >> hard empties your lungs. The pain is relieved immediately and you can
    >> resume running as soon as the pain disappears. The pain usually will
    >> not go away unless you stop running long enough to raise your liver.
     
  12. Mike wrote:

    > ligaments and causing pain. Humans have a fixed pattern of breathing
    > when they run. They have a two to one breathing ratio, breathing once
    > for each two strides. Most people breathe out when the right foot
    > strikes the ground. [...]
    >
    > When you get a stitch, stop running and press your hand deep into your
    > liver to raise it up against your diaphragm. At the same time, purse
    > your lips and blow out against the tightly held lips as hard as you
    > can. Pushing the liver up stops stretching the ligaments. Breathing out
    > hard empties your lungs.


    So, to prevent stitches, I breathe on every
    third (or fifth) foot strike. Left (breathe),
    right, left, right (breathe), left, etc.
    Ever since I started doing that, I've never
    gotten a stitch.

    -- Anita --
     
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