What do you call out when you come up behind pedos?

Discussion in 'Road Cycling' started by Onlooker, Sep 10, 2003.

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  1. Mp

    Mp Guest

    On Wed, 10 Sep 2003 11:13:23 -0500, Onlooker <[email protected]> wrote:

    snip
    >What seems to get the best results to warn them you are passing?
    "Excuse me" seems to work well enough. It lets them know I'm there, and it's reasonably polite.
    >How far back do you call it out? I cant seem to determine the optimum range: too far and they cant
    >hear, too close and they irritated or paniced.
    Twenty feet or so, I suppose. I stay off multi-use paths as much as possible, mostly using them as a
    shortcut from one road to another, but when I'm on them, and there are a lot of walkers and runners
    about, I ride much more slowly than normal. My experience is that most pedestrians will sensibly
    move to the right when they become aware of me, but there will always be some who become flustered
    and jump toward the center of the path. There are also some who, for whatever reason, don't want to
    give way at all, or just remain oblivious to their surroundings. I don't think finding just the
    right words is going to change that, so I'm always ready for a quick stop.

    MP
     


  2. Buck

    Buck Guest

    "Steve McDonald" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:[email protected]

    > I say nothing when I pass people. I just watch them very carefully and am ready to take
    > evasive action in an instant. I've never hit

    I used to ride by silently, but I changed my tactics after two incidents in one day. Our
    neighborhood has a short (less than a mile), paved, multi-use path that runs along one of the
    drainage canals. I thought my daughter would like to see some of the wildlife that gathers along the
    canal, so we took the path one afternoon. I came upon a woman who was maintaining a pretty good
    walking pace and thankfully was staying to the right. I looked at her as we passed to give a her a
    smile and thanks, but I startled her so bad that she almost fell off the path. As we rounded the
    bend, I came upon another cyclist who was resting in the shade, but looking the opposite direction.
    We managed to startle him so much that he jumped and let out an audible "oh!"

    I always thought the trailer made a huge amount of noise as it bounced along behind me. Apparently,
    my perception of noise is a bit off. I wasn't rolling more than 10mph for either of these incidents.
    Neither of these folks were wearing headphones and there wasn't any other noise to drown out what
    noise we made. From now on, I will not assume that people can hear me coming and will call out.
    Perhaps I will be getting a bell....

    -Buck
     
  3. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 14:15:45 GMT, Buck" u n k m a i l g a l a x y c o r p . c o m <@> wrote:
    > as we passed to give a her a smile and thanks, but I startled her so bad that she almost fell off
    > the path. As we rounded the bend, I came upon another cyclist who was resting in the shade, but
    > looking the opposite direction. We managed to startle him so much that he jumped and let out an
    > audible "oh!"

    Wow. Sounds like very jumpy people. I guess they weren't expecting others to be on the path.

    On that stretch, it would be polite to say something, then.

    > we made. From now on, I will not assume that people can hear me coming and will call out. Perhaps
    > I will be getting a bell....

    Well, the silent treatment is supposed to work in that they don't know you're coming until
    you're gone.

    How about baseball cards in the spokes? That would alert people to the presence of a
    cyclist... <BFG>

    > -Buck
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  4. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 05:08:09 -0700 (PDT), Steve McDonald <[email protected]> wrote:
    > Best to slip by them silently, so they can't react until you're past.

    Well, while this was posted in a very...strong way, it works rather well.

    I sometimes say "On your left", "Passing on your left", or nothing at all; they are all about
    equally effective. If I could guess which would be effective on which person...

    The quiet pass works because either they don't know and don't react until it's too late to cause a
    problem, or they do know and act properly.

    "Passing on your left" makes sense, but it's such a long phrase, you have to be going the same speed
    as them for them to hear it; otherwise, you have to start saying it when you're far away, and they
    only hear "ss n blphf".

    "On your left" is shorter but confusing for some.

    > Steve McDonald
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  5. On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 05:08:09 -0700, Steve McDonald wrote:

    > Those who use those idiotic bells are Freds to the 10th degree. They're almost always old coots
    > who think everyone is as impaired as they are.

    Maybe you'll be lucky and never be an old coot yourself. But maybe you should consider the
    alternative.

    > I'm too busy pushing myself in my workout, to have time for social interactions along the way. I'm
    > beginning to see Fabrizio's point about how annoying fredishness is to serious riders.

    "Serious riders" have no business doing a "workout" on a multi-use path, unless your idea of a
    workout is less than 15mph.

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | As far as the laws of mathematics refer to reality, they are not _`\(,_ | certain, and as
    far as they are certain, they do not refer to (_)/ (_) | reality. -- Albert Einstein
     
  6. The way I've worked out is to move distinctly to the left, then say "passing". If they look back,
    they see me coming on the left, and know not to move right. If they don't look back, they generally
    don't veer anyway, so that's good. If it's not safe to be on the left side of the path, I don't pass
    anyway. Though sometimes I do go off the path and pass on the grass.

    Peter
     
  7. H. M. Leary

    H. M. Leary Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, "David L. Johnson" <[email protected]> wrote:

    snip
    >
    > "Serious riders" have no business doing a "workout" on a multi-use path, unless your idea of a
    > workout is less than 15mph.

    David,

    You ride the SRT enough to know that the ³time trialers² that ride this Mup don¹t or cannot go much
    faster than 22-25mph. About 10 mph above the 15mph reccomended trail speed. ( Just like in their
    cars above the Speed Limit. )

    remember when the trail was in sections up to VFNHP?

    Saw a ³time trialer² complete with the skin bootie covers and a full disc wheel. My first. Almost
    caught up to him, and I AM an old foggie!

    HAND

    Glad the BCP Century had good weather!

    --
    ³Freedom Is a Light for Which Many Have Died in Darkness³

    - Tomb of the unknown - American Revolution
     
  8. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, [email protected]
    (Steve McDonald) writes:
    >
    > I say nothing when I pass people. I just watch them very carefully and am ready to take
    > evasive action in an instant.

    MUPs are such low-speed affairs that "evasive action" consists merely of <shrug> turning or slowing
    a little. Maybe putting a foot down for a moment.

    > I've never hit anyone yet. On the rare occasion when someone is able to catch me loafing and pass,
    > I'm fully aware of their presence. It irritates me

    MUPs *are* for loafing.

    > that they think they have to announce themselves, as though I had no awareness of my surroundings.
    > The surest way to cause trouble is to shout "on your left" or "on your right" and have them
    > misunderstand and

    I agree -- those are rider-to-rider signals, not rider-to-pedestrian.

    > move the wrong way. Best to slip by them silently, so they can't react until you're past.

    Wait'll you come up behind a couple of stroller-pushing moms, each with a couple of satellite
    toddlers darting every which way.

    > Those who use those idiotic bells are Freds to the 10th degree. They're almost always old coots
    > who think everyone is as impaired as they are.

    Fredly bells are at least as big as a Skoal tin, brightly chromed, and have a Mickey Mouse decal on
    them. My CatEye Super-Mini is a discrete li'l unit. It has a clockwork-type mechanism that grinds
    out that familiar, old fashioned bicycle bell ting-a-ling. It's quite gentle and friendly sounding.
    I've also got an Incredi-Bel on another bike. That bell pings out a single, jarringly loud note that
    sets one's teeth on edge. I never use it.

    Bells are also useful when going through narrow, blind curves in the trail.

    Here in Vancouver BC, bicycles are legally obligated to be equipped with a signalling device. In
    fact, earlier this summer the local cops did a "crackdown" regarding bicycle equipment -- although I
    believe it was more informative & educational, than about gathering revenue for the city.

    I've got a rubber-bulb horn, too (that's where my Fredism comes in). If I was so inclined, I could
    sneak up behind pedestrians and scare 'em out of their shoes. But I'm not such a meanie. At least I
    haven't been hassled for not having a signalling device.

    > I'm too busy pushing myself in my workout, to have time for social interactions along the way. I'm
    > beginning to see Fabrizio's point about how annoying fredishness is to serious riders.

    Maybe take another look at the very bottom of my previous post, and reconsider the MUP context of
    this thread.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  9. Onlooker <[email protected]> wrote in message news:<[email protected]>...

    > What seems to get the best results to warn them you are passing?

    The first yell is, "Bicycle!", at some distance -- as far as I can be and while I still think they
    can hear me. This is only called out to those walking four abreast, or two smack dab down the
    middle, or whatever.

    Second yell is, "I will be passing you ON YOUR LEFT", which is done much closer, and after they have
    already shifted to the right, making it possible for me to pass.

    Third yell is, "Thanks!", especially if they shifted out of the way to accomodate me.

    I do not use a bell. I did at one time, but no one seemed to know it meant bike approaching. At
    most, it meant, stop dead in your tracks and look in all directions, cluelessly, mouth hanging open
    optional. Also, I can yell faster than I can hunt for a bell on my handlebars -- and real estate on
    my handlebars is precious.

    There are variations on what I call out. There are three older women that I mentally call The Three
    Bubbes, who have New York-y accents that walk together rain or shine on Mercer Island. I always say,
    "Good Morning, ladies!" when I see them, because I see them nearly every day. There's an older black
    woman who walks some sort of miniture mutt after the I-90 tunnel and I usually have a kind word for
    her and her dog, too.

    Warm Regards,

    Claire Petersky ([email protected]) Home of the meditative cyclist:
    http://home.earthlink.net/~cpetersky/Welcome.htm

    Books just wanna be FREE! See what I mean at: http://bookcrossing.com/friend/Cpetersky
     
  10. [email protected] (Tom Keats) wrote in message

    > That's very much my approach, too. I find initially signalling with my bell preferable to any
    > verbal calling-out. The bell has that distinctive sound that immediately identifies it as being
    > attached to a bicycle. Using it causes people who might otherwise be tuning-out nearby verbiage to
    > turn around, assess the situation for themselves, and respond accordingly. Then we can trade
    > smiles and "hellos" as I gently pass.

    A bell is the best solution on MUP's. Even people engrossed in coversation will hear the bell, while
    verbal calling out often fails. There is something about a bell that is less annoying than calling
    out, especially on MUPs where there is a conflict between cyclists and pedestrians.

    In many areas audible devices are required by law, though this is rarely enforced.
     
  11. On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 16:53:34 +0000, H. M. Leary wrote:

    > You ride the SRT enough to know that the ³time trialers² that ride this Mup don¹t or cannot go
    > much faster than 22-25mph. About 10 mph above the 15mph reccomended trail speed. ( Just like in
    > their cars above the Speed
    > Limit. )

    Philadelphia speed limits? Maybe that's universal, though.

    I really don't have trouble with the speed the "time trialers" hit along that path, it's the fact
    that they are in full aero position while doing it, and would have to sit up before they could reach
    their brakes.

    > Saw a ³time trialer² complete with the skin bootie covers and a full disc wheel. My first. Almost
    > caught up to him, and I AM an old foggie!

    that's "old coot", not "old fogey"....

    > Glad the BCP Century had good weather!

    It was great, wasn't it?

    --

    David L. Johnson

    __o | And what if you track down these men and kill them, what if you _`\(,_ | killed all of us?
    From every corner of Europe, hundreds, (_)/ (_) | thousands would rise up to take our places.
    Even Nazis can't kill that fast. -- Paul Henreid (Casablanca).
     
  12. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>,
    [email protected] (Steven Scharf) writes:
    >
    > A bell is the best solution on MUP's. Even people engrossed in coversation will hear the bell,
    > while verbal calling out often fails. There is something about a bell that is less annoying than
    > calling out, especially on MUPs where there is a conflict between cyclists and pedestrians.

    That's pretty much how I figure it, too. Words just get lost in a blur of other ppl's words, unless
    one puts some urgency on them -- in which case, one might as well just yell, "Hey, you!" or "Move
    over!" which would /really/ be annoying to the hearers. And no matter how nice a spin one puts on a
    verbal passing signal, there'll still be pedestrians who will translate it down to "Hey you!" or
    "Move over!" I think bells (and slowing down to pass nicely) give the pedestrians a fair chance to
    do their own responding, and they appreciate that more than suddenly being given directions blurted
    out by some upstart stranger.

    But if a single pedestrian is keeping well to his/her side of the path, and the path is wide
    enough, I don't see any need to pester 'em with any signal -- at least, no more than maybe flicking
    a brake lever.

    Speaking of which, fall seems to have come early. Already we've got dry, dead leaves blowing
    along the streets. Sometimes their crispy rattlings sound *exactly* like a rider behind ya,
    clicking his shifter.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  13. Keith Boone

    Keith Boone Guest

    Steven Scharf wrote:

    >
    > A bell is the best solution on MUP's. Even people engrossed in coversation will hear the bell,
    > while verbal calling out often fails. There is something about a bell that is less annoying than
    > calling out, especially on MUPs where there is a conflict between cyclists and pedestrians.
    >
    > In many areas audible devices are required by law, though this is rarely enforced.

    I agree with using a bell on a MUP. The reaction you get from the peds however will vary according
    to their age. In my experience, here is how it often breaks down:

    Ring the bell when approaching the peds from behind... -Early teens: likely to yell F**k you,
    possibly throw something at you, often just stand there refusing to move -20's to 30's (with small
    children): glare at you as you ride by -40's to 50's: silently step to one side of the path _if_
    they hear you. -60's and up: turn towards you, SMILE, and say "Thank you!!!"

    Maybe those old folks were just raised different?
     
  14. Rick Onanian

    Rick Onanian Guest

    On Thu, 11 Sep 2003 17:31:11 -0700, Tom Keats <[email protected]> wrote:
    > no more than maybe flicking a brake lever. Sometimes their crispy rattlings sound *exactly* like a
    > rider behind ya, clicking his shifter.

    That reminds me; there's yet another signal I sometimes do -- if I am on a bike that can be noisy
    when shifting or braking, I use that. That seems to work the best, but you need a maladjusted bike,
    or at least a bike with friction shifters.

    > cheers, Tom
    --
    Rick Onanian
     
  15. Tom Keats

    Tom Keats Guest

    In article <[email protected]>, Rick Onanian <[email protected]> writes:

    > That reminds me; there's yet another signal I sometimes do -- if I am on a bike that can be noisy
    > when shifting or braking, I use that. That seems to work the best, but you need a maladjusted
    > bike, or at least a bike with friction shifters.

    Yeah, when things are quiet enough, it's often enough of a noise maker to alert folks without
    scaring the bejeezers outa them.

    My MTB has a clicky topmounted shifter with more clicks than gears. Shifting up or down one gear
    sounds sorta like cracking knuckles.

    cheers, Tom

    --
    -- Powered by FreeBSD Above address is just a spam midden. I'm really at: tkeats [curlicue] vcn
    [point] bc [point] ca
     
  16. Alderman

    Alderman Guest

    [email protected] (Steve McDonald) wrote in message
    news:<[email protected]>... Those who use those idiotic
    bells are Freds to the
    > 10th degree. They're almost always old coots who think everyone is as impaired as they are. >
    > Steve McDonald

    First of all, FOAD. I like my bell, it lets people, especially those with dogs know I am coming long
    before I get within hailing distance. Coming up behind people, especially those with dogs, without
    letting them know you are there is foolish and rude to the nth degree. Besides, it annoys my
    girlfriend who thinks it is Freddish. Being an old coot, I dont much care what other people think, I
    just dont want to run over any poodles. they get caught in the spokes.

    Fred
     
  17. old.blue

    old.blue New Member

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  18. old.blue

    old.blue New Member

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    I used to just ... you know ... squeak my brakes ... but I decided that was a bit arogant.

    I have had a lot of success simply calling "cyclist". It's not presumptive. Simply stating a fact. I could honk my horn or ring a bell. I have tried whistling. All of these things are great in theory, but they never really convey the message.

    Of course ... if it's some prick walking a dog off a leash ... I just buzz them ...
     
  19. old.blue

    old.blue New Member

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    I actually enjoy seeing old ladies dance when you call out. I mean geez. Like they weren't expecting a cyclist on this three metre wide concrete strip marked with funny pictures of cyclists lying on their sides.

    I say ... "dance baby ... dance"

    Best thing I have come across so far is a family having a picknic in the middle of the bikelane. Hey .. why not ... at least the cordial won't spill, and you can spot the ants approaching. Ansdits gets so nice and warm on your bum...
     
  20. On several occasions, I have found one or two people, late at night, in their sleeping bags, right
    in the middle of offroad bikepaths. When I tried to reason with them, about how dangerous it was for
    both them and bikers, they always showed no concern. Then, when I whipped out a cell phone and
    pretended to call the police, they all skedaddled without delay. The phone didn't even work-----it
    was just the carcass of one I had found, lying on the road. I could have used an electric razor or a
    camcorder battery, just as well.

    Steve McDonald
     
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