What do you miss least.

Discussion in 'UK and Europe' started by Roger Thorpe, Feb 7, 2003.

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  1. Roger Thorpe

    Roger Thorpe Guest

    I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a few
    of the things that I just can't understand how we tolerated.

    1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were
    like when wet.

    2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.

    3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.

    Of what were you glad to be rid? Roger
    --
    Roger Thorpe

    My email address is spamtrapped. You can work it out!
     
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  2. Peter B

    Peter B Guest

    "Roger Thorpe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a
    > few of the things that I just can't understand how we
    tolerated.
    >
    > 1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were like
    > when wet.
    >
    > 2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    > into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.
    >
    > 3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.
    >
    > Of what were you glad to be rid?

    Definately cotter pins, oh and toeclips and those rusteasy Eveready lights.

    Pete
     
  3. Just Zis Guy

    Just Zis Guy Guest

    On Fri, 7 Feb 2003 15:42:59 +0000 (UTC), "Peter B" <[email protected]> wrote:

    >> Of what were you glad to be rid?

    >Definately cotter pins,

    Oh yes indeedy. And chromed steel mudguards. And pathetic lights. And stamped-out sidepull brakes on
    steel rims.

    Guy
    ===
    ** WARNING ** This posting may contain traces of irony. http://www.chapmancentral.com (BT ADSL and
    dynamic DNS permitting)
    NOTE: BT Openworld have now blocked port 25 (without notice), so old mail addresses may no longer
    work. Apologies.
     
  4. Smudger

    Smudger Guest

    "Roger Thorpe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a
    > few of the things that I just can't understand how we
    tolerated.
    >
    > 1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were like
    > when wet.
    >
    > 2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    > into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.
    >
    > 3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.
    >
    > Of what were you glad to be rid? Roger
    > --
    > Roger Thorpe
    >
    > My email address is spamtrapped. You can work it out!
    >

    I hated the brown rubber grips on old style brake levers. The sort that Durex must have made that
    disintegrated during the winter.

    Can I mention a bike? The Raleigh RSW. It seemed to be made of neutron star matter as it couldn't be
    lifted, or pedalled for that matter.
     
  5. Stephen \

    Stephen \ Guest

    "Roger Thorpe" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a
    > few of the things that I just can't understand how we
    tolerated.
    >
    > 1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were like
    > when wet.
    >
    > 2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    > into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.
    >
    > 3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.
    >
    > Of what were you glad to be rid? Roger
    > --
    Gear shifters that required taking hands off the handlebars. 1 gear bikes, 3 gear bikes, 5 gear
    bikes, 10 gear bikes - although I could probably get by with the right 5.
     
  6. Peter Clinch

    Peter Clinch Guest

    Roger Thorpe wrote:
    > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days.

    > Of what were you glad to be rid?

    Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some handlebars
    in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long distances still
    do that...

    Pete.
    --
    Peter Clinch University of Dundee Tel 44 1382 660111 ext. 33637 Medical Physics, Ninewells Hospital
    Fax 44 1382 640177 Dundee DD1 9SY Scotland UK net [email protected]
    http://www.dundee.ac.uk/~pjclinch/
     
  7. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > Roger Thorpe wrote:
    > > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days.
    >
    > > Of what were you glad to be rid?
    >
    > Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some
    > handlebars in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long
    > distances still do that...

    But then some of us don't find it uncomfortable and actually enjoy it
    :)

    Colin
     
  8. "Smudger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:b20lf2$1p7
    > Can I mention a bike? The Raleigh RSW. It seemed to be made of neutron star matter as it couldn't
    > be lifted, or pedalled for that matter.
    >
    You heathen! My first bike was a blue RSW 14 inherited from my brother. I loved it.

    We eventually converted it into a static bike.

    E
     
  9. In article <[email protected]>, [email protected] says...
    > "Smudger" <[email protected]> wrote in message news:b20lf2$1p7
    > > Can I mention a bike? The Raleigh RSW. It seemed to be made of neutron star matter as it
    > > couldn't be lifted, or pedalled for that matter.
    > >
    > You heathen! My first bike was a blue RSW 14 inherited from my brother. I loved it.
    >
    > We eventually converted it into a static bike.

    Talking of static bikes did anyone else catch that quite disturbing image of Adam Hart Davis naked
    on the Velocipede Shower on TV last night some time?

    Colin
     
  10. >Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some
    >handlebars in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long
    >distances still do that...

    And many find it strangely enjoyable ...

    Cheers, helen s :)

    ~~~~~~~~~~
    Flush out that intestinal parasite and/or the waste product before sending a reply!

    Any speeliong mistake$ aR the resiult of my cats sitting on the keyboaRRRDdd
    ~~~~~~~~~~
     
  11. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "wafflycathcsdirtycatlitter" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > >Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some
    > >handlebars in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long
    > >distances still do that...
    >
    > And many find it strangely enjoyable ...

    And their souls remain in tact :)
     
  12. "Colin Blackburn" <[email protected]> wrote in message

    > > Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some
    > > handlebars in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long
    > > distances still do that...
    >
    > But then some of us don't find it uncomfortable and actually enjoy it
    > :)
    >
    Snag is, once you've tried a bent, and felt just how comfy it is, nothing else quite feels the
    same again...

    Ho hum. Anyone know any unnattached millionairesses?

    E
     
  13. Tony W

    Tony W Guest

    "Just zis Guy, you know?" <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    >
    > >Definately cotter pins,
    >
    > Oh yes indeedy. And chromed steel mudguards. And pathetic lights. And stamped-out sidepull brakes
    > on steel rims.

    Oh. Oh dear. Ummm.

    Well my Indian bike has cotters (the left one will not fit properly in the best traditions of such
    things), very cheap, near ineffective brakes (stamped metal, sort of side pull) and steel rims.

    Plus it is made of neutron star dust to make it heavier.

    And I love it -- for the memories if not for its wonderful performance -- though it is a VERY
    comfortable bike to ride -- hard work up the hills though :(

    T
     
  14. Paul - XXX

    Paul - XXX Guest

    Roger Thorpe deftly scribbled:
    > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a
    > few of the things that I just can't understand how we tolerated.
    >
    > 1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were like
    > when wet.
    >
    > 2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    > into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.
    >
    > 3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.
    >
    > Of what were you glad to be rid? Roger

    Yellow plastic capes and sou' westers .. ;)

    Tyres that lasted generations, but had no grip whatsoever if it even looked like raining .. and
    brake blocks made of a similar compound, that refused to slow ( not too surprising I suppose ) a
    40lb bike in anything cooler than Death Valley temperatures. ;)

    --
    ...................................Paul-xxx Seti 1399 wu in 10037 hours
    http://setiathome.ssl.berkeley.edu/
     
  15. Roger Thorpe

    Roger Thorpe Guest

    Peter B wrote:

    >
    > Definately cotter pins, oh and toeclips and those rusteasy Eveready lights.
    >
    > Pete
    >
    >

    Lights? oh yes. I seem to remember that Wonder lights seemed to be such a massive improvement. I
    wouldn't touch them now. Batteries that would pack up unpredictably and were stocked only by
    bike shops and the kind of wireless repair shop that also stocked valves and round pin plugs.
    Pathetic beam too.

    --
    Roger Thorpe

    My email address is spamtrapped. You can work it out!
     
  16. Danny Colyer

    Danny Colyer Guest

    Peter Clinch wrote:
    > Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some
    > handlebars in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long
    > distances still do that...

    Damn, beat me to it.

    --
    Danny Colyer (remove safety to reply) ( http://www.juggler.net/danny ) Recumbent cycle page:
    http://www.speedy5.freeserve.co.uk/recumbents/ "He who dares not offend cannot be honest." -
    Thomas Paine
     
  17. Colin Blackburn wrote:
    :: Talking of static bikes did anyone else catch that quite disturbing image of Adam Hart Davis
    :: naked on the Velocipede Shower on TV last night some time?
    ::

    Yeah, I saw it. One for the spinners among us - shower and cycle at the same time, quite funny
    really. Seemed like a lot of water was going on the floor - perhaps that was why it never caught on
    ;-). As for Adam Hart Davis.. disgusting!

    Rich
     
  18. On Fri, 07 Feb 2003 15:20:03 +0000, Roger Thorpe <myinitialdotmysurna[email protected]> wrote:

    >I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a
    >few of the things that I just can't understand how we tolerated.
    >
    >1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were like
    > when wet.
    >
    >2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    > into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.
    >
    >3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.
    >
    >Of what were you glad to be rid? Roger

    Those Puma shoes from the 70's with the white plastic soles and the "adjustable" shoe plates. Once
    you wore out the rubber adhesion strips on the heels they were lethal to walk in. But they were the
    height of fashion so you had to have them - especially when teamed with a sponsored head band and
    sweat bands for your wrists.

    Cheers! Stephen
     
  19. Marc

    Marc Guest

    Colin Blackburn <[email protected]> wrote:

    > > Having to sit with my weight spread between a wee traingle of plastic or leather and some
    > > handlebars in an uncomfortable crouch for hours at a time. Of course, most people cycling long
    > > distances still do that...
    >
    > But then some of us don't find it uncomfortable and actually enjoy it
    > :)

    That's true, they are called cyclists.
     
  20. Paul - xxx <[email protected]> wrote in message
    news:[email protected]...
    > Roger Thorpe deftly scribbled:
    > > I was just thinking about how some aspects of cycling had got much better these days. Here are a
    > > few of the things that I just can't understand how we tolerated.
    > >
    > > 1. Woollen shorts that itched and gave me a spectacular rash. Just imagine what they were like
    > > when wet.
    > >
    > > 2. shoeplates that you had to nail onto your sole, with nails that often managed to poke through
    > > into your feet but still didn't manage to hold the plates on.
    > >
    > > 3. Articulated trucks that didn't have underriders along the side.
    > >
    > > Of what were you glad to be rid? Roger
    >

    how about pushrod brakes
     
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