What does Crosstrail do that Hardrock can't...?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by fizbiz, Aug 26, 2011.

  1. fizbiz

    fizbiz New Member

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    So after spending a few weeks on my Wal-mart grade MTB I want to invest in a quality bike. Entry level, but at least well built with room to upgrade as budget permits. It will be a commuter bike. Not on roads but sidewalks, occasional curb jumps. If it is trail capable it may see that type on use once or twice a year but I couldn't care less if I don't ever do serious off roading. I like the idea of the Crosstrail but my question is this...If I put semi-slick 1.5" tires on the Hardrock sport disc, then what benefits does the Crosstrail offer? Is the gearing much more road style (easy to run out of gears on a road that is slightly downhill for the better part of a mile on a MTB). The Hardrock sport disc does have fork lock-out that the Crosstrail doesn't but if that was what I decided on, the Trek DS 8.3 provides that feature. I'm am looking at 2012 models btw. Hardrock sport disc, vs Crosstrail disc, vs. Trek DS 8.3. All just a touch over $600 MSRP. The bike will be used in stock condition for at least a year (prob 2 or 3). Other than tires maybe (if I get the hardrock). My other concern with the Crosstrail/Dual Sport bikes is getting parts. Are forks for those bike readily available should I choose to upgrade in the future? And what about disc ready 700c wheels? Don't see many of those. Can a 29er wheel be mounted to the Crosstrail/DS assuming a thin enough tire is used to allow for clearance between the fork? A lot of questions I know but I need as much info as possible before I go to the LBS. I really like the Trek DS 8.3 (test rode one), but again...what are the real advantages that can't be had fairly easily on the Hardrock. Is it much lighter? Better road gearing (again easy to do on Hardrock). Durability/strength of frame is a non-issue. Like I said...don't care if I never off road it. But it needs to be urban environment tough.

    Also...I should mention, I insist on front suspension. I have tendonitis in my wrist and the damping is a must for 80% of the sidewalks I will ride. Also...I will never ride more than a 20 mile round trip. If I need to go much further than that I will drive. It is a commuter/fitness/low carbon emission transportation option. That's all.
     
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  2. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    for almost the same price as the Trek DS 8.3 checkout the Trek 4300 Disc, its more sturdy if you are planning to jump on and off the sidewalks regularly,
     
  3. fizbiz

    fizbiz New Member

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    Does the 8.3 do anything better than a 4300 with 1.5" semi-slicks?
     
  4. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    you can go a bit faster on the 8.3.
     
  5. fizbiz

    fizbiz New Member

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    How so? Because of gearing or is it just lighter? Because other than the wheel/tires (tires being more significant) I don't see why it would be faster. I'm leaning more and more to the Hardrock sport disc just because I don't really see the advantage of the Crosstrail/DS.
     
  6. fizbiz

    fizbiz New Member

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    So even the guy at the LBS couldn't really give me a real answer. Seems even the gearing is more or less the same. I have therefore decided on the Hardrock Sport Disc 29er. The 2012 Rockhoppers jumped in price from the 2011 but the top-of-the-line Hardrock actually dropped $10 in MSRP. Pretty good bike for the money. I looked at the Trek 4300 but decided I don't want to venture into the world of hydraulic brakes just yet. Feels like I'd be opening up a can of worms with that.

    So in conclusion. SPECIALIZED HARDROCK SPORT DISC 29er it is. (Assuming I can find the Grey/Silver one in my size).
     
  7. vspa

    vspa Active Member

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    good choice, i also prefer mechanical disc brakes,
    regarding speed you will always go faster on thinner tires but you will need to true the wheel more often if you go up and down the sidewalks regularly,

    excellent bike and you get to save 100 usd, congratulations
     
  8. fizbiz

    fizbiz New Member

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    So, funny story. Went to LBS today to try out a couple sizes and saw a Giant Roam 1. Much better components, and since it's a 2011 I can get it for $460 (MSRP $620) with 3 years of free tuneups and labor on repairs (hopefully don't need many of those in 3 years). Loved the look in white. Last one in a small. Decided there was no reason to get a MTB only to have to spend more money on new tires, and a new crank (possibly chain), when I can get a bike already setup exactly the way I want it for $460. And on top of that, the components are better to begin with. Just thought I would provide an update in case anybody else is having trouble deciding between a MTB and a rugged hybrid. Just did a bit of research and plan on picking it up tomorrow.
     
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