What fits my needs?

Discussion in 'Bike buying advice' started by scarleton, Jul 15, 2013.

  1. scarleton

    scarleton New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    I am looking for a new bike and it doesn't seem like there is one out that fits what I want. I am a BIG guy, 6'4" and 320lb. I have not road much in the last 10 years (hence the 320 lb), but am back out on the road and loving it! I am riding between 50 and 100 miles a week right now on the road.


    I am currently riding my 1990 Moody Fox mountain bike. All my riding is on black top, so I have the tires that are slicks in the middle, tread on the sides for turning in grass and mud.

    The most important thing that I LOVE about my bike and simply do NOT want to give up and am willing to give anything else up to keep this: big wide tires so I don't have to care about what I ride over, rocks, pot holes, who knows what. I don't do real good at paying attention to that type of thing. I rode with some friends the other week who had touring bikes. They where always calling out road hazards to each other. I simply don't think/ride that way, I cycle for fun, first and foremost. Having to worry about the road every second takes away from the enjoyment, and flat tires would make it not fun very fast!

    The two things I hate about my bike is:

    • Cheap components: I had the bike tuned up in the spring and each time I pressed down on the right peddle, it makes a sound, now a few hundred miles later, my 320lb pressing down on the crank, it makes a sound with both sides. It is slowly driving me crazy!
    • Going down hill, the bike isn't geared as high as I would like it.

    My two big concerns are having big tires, but a bike strong enough to deal with my size and not get the crank out of alignment. Can I do that with simply put nicer components on the bike, or is there give in the steal frame?

    What bikes out there can hold my size and allow me to not worry about the road? Any suggestions?

    Sam
     
    Tags:


  2. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    3,233
    Likes Received:
    95
    Maybe you just need a set of bulletproof wheels for the old Fox, then. Your local shop can find or make them for you. Or maybe a new mountain bike with 29" wheels will do it. The big wheels will roll better under your weight and as the price point approaches mid-range, the stock wheels get remarkably strong.

    Regarding gearing, you probably don't want to hear this, but learning to turn the cranks faster is a cheap solution and it's better for your legs and heart. Mountain bike gearing really shouldn't run out til you're doing about 30. The problem with trying to change mountain bike gearing beyond getting different cassettes for the rear wheel is that frame geometry and front derailleur installation are pretty closely tied to a maximum chain ring size of 44 t.

    Or maybe alfeng can show you how to build exactly what you want in your own garage.
     
  3. scarleton

    scarleton New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    About the gearing, it is when I am in the 30~33 MPH range that I run out. I am going down that hill and want to be able to pumpt a bit harder, faster to get the speed to get up the next hill and... I simply cannot make my legs spin any faster. Even back in the day when I was in a lot better shape, I didn't have it in me:(

    The other, actually biggest issue I have, is how noisy the bike is. It is the main crank that makes all the noise. I could be wrong, but I am pretty sure it is getting loose. After I got the bike back from the shop, they said they repacked the crank. At the time, it only made a sound when I pressed down with my right leg, now it is both. I simply want a quite ride. With my size, could I get that with a better crank, or is my size going to mess with anything steal bike because of the flex in steal?

    Currently I am in dreaming mode, so I am not too concerned about money. I figure once I have an idea of what is really going to work best for me, then I can focus on finding the funds. Thus, because of my size, I am thinking that maybe the best thing to do is go with a titanium frame. Thoughts?
     
  4. maydog

    maydog Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Feb 5, 2010
    Messages:
    1,333
    Likes Received:
    90
    Generally a crank will not make noise - they guys at the shop repacked your bottom bracket (BB). The BB consists of the bearings that attach the crank to the frame. You must have an old school ball bearing unit. If the BB is the issue, you can replace it relatively cheaply. Another possibility is that the chain is rubbing on the derailleur during peak torque during the pedal stroke - this sound would be much different.

    Is it possible to post a recording of the noise you are experiencing?

    Being able to push a larger gear while going down hill will not help you up the next as much as you think. The faster you go the more you are working against the wind - you will use up energy descending that you could have saved for the upcoming climb. I bet you descend like a rocket. Go ahead and soft pedal on the way down you earned the short break. Starting up the next hill with a fast cadence is the way to go anyway - too big of a gear you find yourself slowing rapidly.
     
  5. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    Originally Posted by oldbobcat .

    Maybe you just need a set of bulletproof wheels for the old Fox, then. Your local shop can find or make them for you. Or maybe a new mountain bike with 29" wheels will do it. The big wheels will roll better under your weight and as the price point approaches mid-range, the stock wheels get remarkably strong.

    Regarding gearing, you probably don't want to hear this, but learning to turn the cranks faster is a cheap solution and it's better for your legs and heart. Mountain bike gearing really shouldn't run out til you're doing about 30. The problem with trying to change mountain bike gearing beyond getting different cassettes for the rear wheel is that frame geometry and front derailleur installation are pretty closely tied to a maximum chain ring size of 44 t.

    Or maybe alfeng can show you how to build exactly what you want in your own garage.



    Originally Posted by scarleton .

    I am looking for a new bike and it doesn't seem like there is one out that fits what I want. I am a BIG guy, 6'4" and 320lb. I have not road much in the last 10 years (hence the 320 lb), but am back out on the road and loving it! I am riding between 50 and 100 miles a week right now on the road.


    I am currently riding my 1990 Moody Fox mountain bike. All my riding is on black top, so I have the tires that are slicks in the middle, tread on the sides for turning in grass and mud.

    The most important thing that I LOVE about my bike and simply do NOT want to give up and am willing to give anything else up to keep this: big wide tires so I don't have to care about what I ride over, rocks, pot holes, who knows what. I don't do real good at paying attention to that type of thing. I rode with some friends the other week who had touring bikes. They where always calling out road hazards to each other. I simply don't think/ride that way, I cycle for fun, first and foremost. Having to worry about the road every second takes away from the enjoyment, and flat tires would make it not fun very fast!

    The two things I hate about my bike is:

    • Cheap components: I had the bike tuned up in the spring and each time I pressed down on the right peddle, it makes a sound, now a few hundred miles later, my 320lb pressing down on the crank, it makes a sound with both sides. It is slowly driving me crazy!
    • Going down hill, the bike isn't geared as high as I would like it.

    My two big concerns are having big tires, but a bike strong enough to deal with my size and not get the crank out of alignment. Can I do that with simply put nicer components on the bike, or is there give in the steal frame?

    What bikes out there can hold my size and allow me to not worry about the road? Any suggestions?

    Sam


    FIRST, the gearing will possibly be the easiest problem to resolve ...

    It may be presumptive, but since upgrades/updates were not mentioned, the smallest cog on the rear wheel's cluster is probably a 13t ...

    • the easiest solution is to buy a new rear wheel & install an appropriate 7-or-8-speed Cassette
    • just be sure that the new Cassette has an 11t smallest cog
    • choose a Cassette whose largest Cog matches the largest Cog you use-or-wish-you-had

    • if you are handy + can follow instructions which are readily available on-line, then you may want to opt to re-lace the current rim on a replacement hub ...
    • OR, lace up a new wheel from scratch!!

    FYI. A pair of 9-speed Shimano Deore shifters should only set you back about $30 +/- ...

    The difference between a 9-speed LX Cassette & a 7-or-8-speed Cassette probably won't be more than $10 ...

    A 9-speed Shimano rear derailleur (I recommend XT, SLX, or LX) will be $40+ ... but, try your current rear derailleur first BECAUSE it may work with the 9-speed shifters.

    If you buy the components off of eBay, you will pay considerably less than if you buy the components at your LBS.

    Even if the largest Chainring on your crank only has 42t, you will have increased the so-called "gear inches" by a considerable amount after you transition to a rear cluster which has an 11t Cog ... and, if (as I suspect would be the case due to the bike's vintage) your crank's outer Chainring has more teeth, then you will probably be good-to-go for the descents ...

    THAT SQUEAKY CRANKSET. You may not need to replace your crankset ...

    If you have a crank puller (and, you/everyone should have one if they have an "older" bike unless their vintage crankset has self-extracting bolts), then remove, GREASE & RE-INSTALL ...

    OR ... remove the crank & shim the tapers with either the foil from a used disposable aluminum (pie!) pan-or-equivalent OR some thin brass foil-or-stock ... brass foil is better than aluminum foil.

    AND, ADD GREASE!!!

    For some (misguided) reason, a few years ago someone decided that tapered BBs should not be greased ... and, others parroted that advice ... I feel that to be be wrong thinking ... and, I throw-caution-to-the-wind & continue to grease the square tapers on my square taper Campagnolo and square taper Shimano BBs ...

    • the possible problem with greasing the tapers is that a ham-fisted person may over-tighten the crank onto the BB tapers which would then result in VERY DIFFICULT removal of the crank arms.

    If you want to change the crankset, then ANY Road Triple should be able to clear the chainstays on a vintage steel frame OR (of course) any MTB triple.

    While the Chainrings of a Road Double will probably clear the stays, due to your height it will probably be beneficial to have a crankset with a slightly wider Q-Factor (the distance between the outside of the crank arms) even if you end up removing the Granny chainring.

    FWIW. The ONLY cranks which I would not recommend are those which use ISIS BBs & GXP Cranksets ... they can certainly work well, but I would avoid the former (based on FIRST HAND EXPERIENCE) because the quality control on the BBs was iffy & I think it may still be possible to get a lemon from "old stock" ... and, the latter just because at some point in time (if not already!?!), the asymmetrical spindle diameter will become an "orphan" as far as acquiring replacement cups (yes, yes, you can buy the appropriate cartridge bearings separately & install them in the BB cups) ... that is, the critical mass is probably with Shimano and therefore the safest option for the consumer ...

    • consequently, I suggest that if you opt for a replacement Crankset that you choose either a Shimano Hollowtech II crankset & BB or an FSA MegaExo crankset & BB ...
    • the fore mentioned FSA & Shimano external BBs are interchangeable ... some people feel that the FSA BBs do not last as long ... that may indeed be the case BECAUSE the Shimano bearings are shrouded by an additional "lip" which is absent from the FSA's cups OR it could something else OR an incorrect perception ... Campagnolo's bearings, by comparison, are OPEN-to-the-World ..
    • and, Campagnolo expects the cyclist to ensure that the inner face of the cartridge bearing is well slathered with grease

    With that information under your belt, if you feel a new bike is in your future, then I concur that a 29er (700c wheels which typically have FAT 700x53 or 700x58 tires) whose top tube + stem have an equal combined dimension as the top tube + stem of your current bike IF you don't want the new bike to feel significantly different when you are in-the-saddle on your current bike ...

    • at 6'4", an XL frame is probably in our future ...
    • you may-or-may-not need to adjust the reach by using a shorter-or-longer stem

    Now, on the DIY front, a wheel with 700x42 (aka "Hybrid) tires will probably fit in your current bike's frame ...

    There is supposed to be a 700x48 (1.9) tire out there which probably is the equivalent size as your current "slick" tire.

    Now, oldbobcat was undoubtedly joking when he suggested that I instruct you on modifying your current bike for use with a 29er tires due to the lengthy discourse which would follow (vs. the lengthy preceding exposition!?!) ...

    • unfortunately, I have yet to see a "stock" 26er frame which had clearance for a 700x53 tire. the 700x48 might fit ... a 700x42 will probably fit ... a 700x32 will definitely fit
    • so, while amending a 26er MTB frame to use 700x53 tires might be possible, it would require a welding/brazing torch + the willingness to do some cold forging on the chainstays --- the work of a framebuilder-OR-comparable ...

    Modifying an old Hardtail which normally uses 26" wheels for use with up to 700x32 tires is child's play (IMO) ... but, THAT is not an area of immediate discussion.

    The frame of an off-the-shelf "Hybrid" bike which comes with 700c wheels may-or-may-not be able to accommodate 700x53 tires ...

    • a Rigid Hybrid Fork can accommodate 700x53 tires
    • a Hybrid with a don't-waste-the-money-on-it Suspension Fork probably cannot handle 700x53 tire, but who knows?

    THAT was a ponderous way of saying that YOU really need to decide on the maximum tire size that you know-or-think-you-may-want-to-use in the future when selecting any possible replacement.

    If you want a bike with a front suspension, then a 29er Hardtail with a Suspension Fork should be on your shopping list ...

    Otherwise, a 29er Hardtail with a Rigid Fork will be the better option, particularly if you are riding on pavement and/or surfaces which are not particularly demanding ...

    • I believe that most 29er Hardtails which have Rigid Forks have forks which are "suspension corrected" so that retrofitting with a Suspension Fork is mostly a matter of doling out more money ...
    • A Suspension Fork will add at least 2 lbs to the bike's front end over the weight of a Rigid Fork ... that's dead weight if your riding environment doesn't need it.

    BTW. I vote "No" on the Titanium frame for you ... a Titanium frame will probably have more flex than a Steel or Aluminum Alloy frame will experience.
     
  6. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    3,233
    Likes Received:
    95
    Alf, I wasn't suggesting modifying the Fox for 29" wheels, I was suggesting purchasing a mid-range mountain bike with 29" wheels. RTFP. You know I'm almost as smart as you, I just hate hairy-assed upgrading for beginners, amateurs, and people who have to work with deadlines.

    With its crappy components and noisy drivetrain, it sounds like the old Fox is ready to kick the bucket anyway. If you don't have any affection for this thing, don't pour money into upgrading it. It will only continue to let you down, unless you enjoy spending your Saturday nights shopping for parts, trying to make things fit, and generally not doing other things. Alf likes doing this, and he believes everyone else would too, if we would only believe in him and Sheldon Brown. I wrench for money, so when I put big chainrings on a mountain bike, it turns into a waste of time because then I have to call the customer to say the chainring hits the chain stay, so he needs a longer bottom bracket spindle, but that screws up the chain line to rear cogs, and the derailleur won't extend far enough to pop the chain onto the big ring either.

    Really, is there anything preventing you from shopping at a bike shop? I'm thinking of three different types of bike for you
    • Fitness bike like a Trek 7.3 FX. Advantage is a really fun ride on the road and all the top end gearing you'll need. Disadvantage is a maximum tire width of about 45mm. This could be good enough, though. Talk it up with a dealer.
    • Mid-range 29'er hardtail mountain bike, like a Trek Marlin. Rugged, but gearing will be an issue. Otherwise, I think alf and I are somewhat in agreement over this.
    • Dual sport, like a Trek DS 8.4. Splits the difference between the mountain bike and the fitness bike.

    I work for a Trek dealer, so forgive my bias. Every other major brand has bikes in these categories.
     
  7. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    12,596
    Likes Received:
    160
    There you go. I'll bet if you visit a few shops--and there are a number of good shops in Cincinnati--you'll find several bikes from several brands that will work for you. You'll likely find older bikes in stock whose prices are marked down. NOS bikes quite often allow you to get a bit more out of your money than you would buying a model from the current year. FWIW, my father-in-law just bought a Trek 7.4 FX Disc, and it works well for him. He's about your size, and the roads around here very likely as crappy as yours. The 7.3 FX will be less expensive, but won't really be any different in quality. Again, other brands have models that correspond in function and price to Trek's.
     
  8. lixiang

    lixiang New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 18, 2013
    Messages:
    1
    Likes Received:
    0
    For us, it is a difficult problem
     
  9. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    Originally Posted by oldbobcat .

    Alf, I wasn't suggesting modifying the Fox for 29" wheels, I was suggesting purchasing a mid-range mountain bike with 29" wheels. RTFP. You know I'm almost as smart as you, I just hate hairy-assed upgrading for beginners, amateurs, and people who have to work with deadlines.

    With its crappy components and noisy drivetrain, it sounds like the old Fox is ready to kick the bucket anyway. If you don't have any affection for this thing, don't pour money into upgrading it. It will only continue to let you down, unless you enjoy spending your Saturday nights shopping for parts, trying to make things fit, and generally not doing other things. Alf likes doing this, and he believes everyone else would too, if we would only believe in him and Sheldon Brown. I wrench for money, so when I put big chainrings on a mountain bike, it turns into a waste of time because then I have to call the customer to say the chainring hits the chain stay, so he needs a longer bottom bracket spindle, but that screws up the chain line to rear cogs, and the derailleur won't extend far enough to pop the chain onto the big ring either.

    Really, is there anything preventing you from shopping at a bike shop? I'm thinking of three different types of bike for you
    • Fitness bike like a Trek 7.3 FX. Advantage is a really fun ride on the road and all the top end gearing you'll need. Disadvantage is a maximum tire width of about 45mm. This could be good enough, though. Talk it up with a dealer.
    • Mid-range 29'er hardtail mountain bike, like a Trek Marlin. Rugged, but gearing will be an issue. Otherwise, I think alf and I are somewhat in agreement over this.
    • Dual sport, like a Trek DS 8.4. Splits the difference between the mountain bike and the fitness bike.

    I work for a Trek dealer, so forgive my bias. Every other major brand has bikes in these categories. FWIW. While it might be suggestible that some people who live in Ohio might feel that you just spammed us, I don't think that your suggestions were inappropriate.



    HMmmm. I did read the post ...

    • well, I read what you actually wrote vs. what you may think you wrote ...

    You DID indeed mention 29ers which are apparently referred to as a bike with '29" wheels' in Boulder ... not a completely inaccurate statement, but sometimes it is more meaningful to use the common nomenclature ...

    So, with the understanding that we both agree that the OP (scarleton) may find a 29er a good option regardless of whether he is not going too far away from civilization on his rides, after you went through your earlier discourse in the thread, YOU apparently felt compelled to add:

    "Or maybe alfeng can show you how to build exactly what you want in your own garage."

    Which is why I took the time to indicate the limitations of non-26" wheels in a 26er frame.

    Regardless of whether-or-not spending a couple of hundred Dollars (possibly under $100 if it is just a new set of Deore shifters + a new hub + 11-32 Cassette & the OP can DIY) is less costly than spending $500-to-$5000+ must be a matter of where one learned their basic arithmetic ...

    • in school
    • or, at the government's teet
     
  10. alienator

    alienator Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jun 10, 2004
    Messages:
    12,596
    Likes Received:
    160
    And there it is: he can't resist interjecting his politics where they are completely irrelevant. That's reason enough to ignore his advice.
     
  11. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    3,233
    Likes Received:
    95
    I don't know what's so ambiguous about this. I said see your local shop about finding or making bulletproof wheels for your old bike. Or get a new mountain bike with 29" wheels. Nothing about Boulder. Nothing about putting 29" wheels on the Fox. All I was dong was throwing some ideas out, none of them being truly definitive, but none truly awful, either. Scarleton's initial post didn't give much information so I was trying to get a conversation going. Which apparently worked.

    Afl, pull your head out of the clouds and start relating to people, not bicycles.

    Alf, I would rather be totally wrong in all my recommendations on what bike to get or fix if one person goes to a bike shop, has a conversation with the people there and rides some bikes, and rides out the door completely satisfied. I understand that some of us here have an aversion to bike shops, but for most people a bike shop is exactly what they need. And if they want to run some of their impressions of what happened at a bike shop by us, well, that's a good reason for us to be here.
     
  12. scarleton

    scarleton New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 15, 2013
    Messages:
    18
    Likes Received:
    0
    Oldbobcat,

    So you know, I have no aversion to bike shops, I just get that it is their nature to be bias to the bikes they sell. I am one that likes to collection some facts and knowledge before talking with sales people. When I am in the know, it clears some smoke and gets us down to honest answers to honest questions:)

    Where do I stand right now? I am not going to be doing anything until the fall or winter, so I am just collection info right now. I did learn of something earlier this week that changes things a bit for me...

    double century rides

    I love going long distances and the challenge of doing a double century in one day is very appealing to me. So... My thinking right now is that I really do need a road bike with a bit of speed. I can only imagine that a double century on a mountain bike averaging 13 mph might make for an amazing long day. I am thinking that a good touring bike with 700x32 to 700x38 would give me some more speed , making for a more enjoyable double century.

    What I am starting to find interesting and a bit frustrating is that bikes that take those wide 700 tires are heavy touring bikes. I like the idea of a touring bike, because from all accounts they are more comfortable on long rides, I don't like the idea of a 40lb bike:)

    One question I do have is: Is my impression correct that with good set of 700x32 to 700x38 tires that are correctly inflated, I can continue to be as not paranoid about watching the road all the time for obstacles as I am with my mountain bike?

    Sam

    Sam
     
  13. Bill1947

    Bill1947 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    After skimming over some of the replies, it appears you've already gotten some good advice, but I'm thinking that 700x32 are still going to be a bit skinnier than you'd like. A steel-framed mountain bike is probably going to fill the bill. (Aluminum may stress excessively with 300# in just two or three years). Steel mountain bike frames are built to take a beating and fat tires can handle more weight. But I don't think I'd mess with the gearing unless you really know what you're doing. To get the road speed you want and not lose the climbing gears might call for a bit more movement than most cogsets/sprokets & derailluers are meant to do. I've customized a mountain bike in an attempt to gear for both the ascents and descents and I ended up having to do a bit of hacking to make everything work. If that sound is coming from the bb, I'd have those bearings replaced pronto before you end up having to machine out the bore.
     
  14. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    3,233
    Likes Received:
    95
    Sam, that's quite a leap from 50-100 miles a week to double centuries. You're right about not wanting to do long rides on a 40-lb bike with really fat tires. Before going too deep into bikes, I'm interested in what you see happening to your weight. Are you planning to stay at 320 lbs, or do you have a target for weight loss? Because where you are now and where you intend to be should factor into your decision.

    For longer, serious rides I don't see any way around getting some configuration of road bike, but preferably one that will accommodate fatter (at least 28 mm) tires. Two types that might work are the "endurance" road bike and the recreational cyclocross bike. The endurance road generally has a longer, more compliant wheelbase and a more upright riding position. The caveat with one of these is to find one whose frame will clear the tires you want to use. The recreational cyclocross bike is a category that's been around for a while but has been heating up recently. It takes a slightly longer, more compliant cyclocross frame with wide wheel clearances and cantilever or disk brakes, and adds features that utility-minded road riders would like, such as triple or compact double cranksets and bosses for mounting fenders and racks.

    Regarding brands, shops are all prejudiced toward what they sell, but there really are no bad brands. Some are better than others in certain categories. For instance in recreational cyclocross, Raleigh's Roper has a fine steel frame and all the good stuff like disk brakes and compact double gearing, but it's pricey. The Bianchi Volpe is another neat bike in this category, less expensively equipped but with triple chain rings for more capability for loaded touring or less athletic climbing. In the endurance category, the Trek Domane has the casual riding posture, compliant ride, and wide clearances, but it's only available with a carbon frame so far. The Specialized Roubaix created this category a decade ago, and it's now available in an aluminum version called the Secteur, but tire clearances might be a problem. I can't recommend bikes though because you aren't even sure of your needs, and that's partly because they're changing. And there are simply too many bikes. Conceivably, you could even get some sort of interim bike just to get yourself to your starting line.

    Best bet is to look at where you are now, where you intend to be, and how your needs are going to evolve. Make a list of needs and features that might be important to you, and use it to inform your talks with different dealers, and take some test rides. Rent a road bike for a weekend and take a couple long rides to see if that's something you want to do. Then if you need some second opinions, share your findings and impressions and we'll tell you what we think. But it's your bike and your life.
     
  15. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    RATHER, it is YOU who are choosing to interpret a statement as political ...

    • your Rorschach reaction has you interpreting a non-either-or statement as such!
    • consequently, YOU are apparently projecting your politics into the statement

    Since 'I' went to Public Schools, it could be suggested that 'I' suckled "at the government's teet" during MY formative years when 'I' learned the simple arithmetic which 'I' was taught ...

    What about yourself?

    • Public Schools, too?
    • Private Schools?
    • Parochial Schools?
    • Other?
     
  16. Bill1947

    Bill1947 New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 19, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    1
    • in school
    • or, at the government's teet

    ...I don't think remarks like these belong in a biking forum. If that's the kind of posts that this site prefers, I'm going elsewhere.
     
  17. KangaDeux

    KangaDeux New Member

    Joined:
    Jul 21, 2013
    Messages:
    5
    Likes Received:
    0
    If it ain't broke, don't fix it. If the frame fits you well, and you really enjoy riding it, just upgrade it. A decent new crankset, derailleurs, and rear cluster will be considerably cheaper than getting a new bike to fit a guy your size, especially if it is freewheel.
     
  18. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    3,233
    Likes Received:
    95
    Alf, let's call a truce.

    Earlier this evening I sat down to reread this thread to find out where it got derailed, and I think it was when you took offense to my remark about building a bike in your garage with alfeng. And the strange was that I made this suggestion in all seriousness. Well, there may have been a little lightheartedness in it, but scarleton's initial post was so open-ended and blue sky that I wanted to cover some more bases, and I thought, sure, why not, maybe my crack will drag alfeng into this and these guys just might hit it off.

    I don't know if you've noticed, but in threads where you are hitting it off with someone, I've been staying out of it. Seriously, even though your wonkiness and single-mindedness annoys me, I respect your knowledge and experience. If you and scarleton decide that building a Frankenbike is in his best interest, well, then, it's just time for the tailless one to just butt out.

    But please don't deride my education, 'cause

    When some loud braggart tries to put me down
    And says his school is great,
    I tell him right away
    Now what's the matter buddy?
    Ain't you heard of my school,
    Its number one in the state!

    I'm true to my school.
     
  19. alfeng

    alfeng Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Jul 23, 2005
    Messages:
    6,723
    Likes Received:
    126
    So, there I was ...

    minding my own business ...

    The next thing I know, I'm being insincerely invoked to provide some input ...

    No problem ...

    The issue of the viability of a 29er for anyone begs the question, "Can I put those wheels-and-tires on my bike?"

    Incredibly, with some/many older "Touring" frames, the smaller (700x52) 29er tires will fit & can be used when fenders are not present:
    [​IMG]
    That's a perfect setup for fire roads ...

    So, why not a 26er frame, too?!?

    I was compelled to try ... and, the verdict is "29er tires will certainly fit in some Rigid 26er forks, but they will not fit in an unmodified 26er Hardtail frame."

    • with the challenge before me, I am almost in the mood to drastically re-work a 26er frame to accommodate 29er tires ...
    • HOWEVER, it is NOT something that can be done without a great deal of effort AND consequently scarleton should (IMO) simply consider replacing his shifters with a set of DEORE shifters which he can buy off of eBay + get a rear wheel which can accommodate a Cassette which has an 11t Cog ...
    Why pay more?

    TRUCE? Well, while I don't agree with your general belief that the average cyclist is incapable of performing simple maintenance or compoent swaps on his/her bike, it seems that you have intercepted comments intended for other people who are also denizens of Boulder in the belief that they were directed at you ...

    Consequently, you apparently have taken offense every time I sent a shot across the bow of others whose principle organizations (there is more than one) have a 'V' in the name for being less competent than they are being paid to be (IMO) ...

    • FYI. My reference to schooling was not directed to you, but to that nameless refugee from Tucson ...

    In other words, I am not sparring with you ...
     
  20. oldbobcat

    oldbobcat Well-Known Member

    Joined:
    Aug 31, 2003
    Messages:
    3,233
    Likes Received:
    95
    So. . . On getting the 29" (OK, 700c) wheel in the 26" frame, how do we get the brake shoes to make contact with the significantly larger rim? Well, maybe we can drill holes in the fork crown and seatstay bridge to accept long-reach dual pivot road brakes.

    By the way, have you seen the new 9-speed Alivio derailleurs and shifters? Really nice, and a good price-- should be popular with upgraders and guys who need MTB derailleurs on their road bikes.
     
Loading...
Loading...